57

In ruby 1.9 is there a way to define this hash with the new syntax?

irb> { a:  2 }
=> {:a=>2}

irb> { a-b:  2 }
SyntaxError: (irb):5: syntax error, unexpected tLABEL
{ a-b:  2 }
      ^

with the old one, it's working:

irb> { :"a-b" =>  2 }
=> {:"a-b"=>2}

4 Answers 4

64

There are some legitimate symbols that cannot be used with the new syntax. I cannot find a reference, but it appears that a symbol name matching /^[a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_0-9]*[!?]?$/ is allowed with the new syntax. The last character may be the special character "!" or "?".

For any symbol that does not meet these restrictions, you have to use the Ruby 1.8 syntax, :'my-symbol-name'

7
  • 1
    Which makes sense; how is the Ruby interpreter supposed to read that, otherwise?
    – Trevoke
    Jan 25, 2010 at 19:10
  • 22
    I checked in parse.c and it seems that with the new syntax the symbol is parsed as tLabel token. And matching name is more like /[a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z0-9]/ :-)
    – MBO
    Jan 25, 2010 at 19:24
  • 3
    @prusswan - I can't imagine a purist programming in Ruby. Aug 21, 2012 at 13:01
  • 2
    In Ruby 2.1 and Rails 4.0, passing data: { my_attr: 'foo' } to a helper method like button_tag will produce data-my-attr="foo" in the rendered HTML
    – Chris Beck
    Jan 23, 2014 at 1:31
  • 1
    ? and ! are also also valid characters if they are the final characters before the colon. Similar to method names. So this is valid: {a: 1, b?: 2, c!: 3}
    – jwadsack
    Dec 12, 2014 at 18:50
24

You can combine the old and new syntax:

{a: 1, b: 2, :'c-c' => 3, d: 4}
0
24

To use dashes with the new syntax:

<%= link_to "Link", link_path, {data: {something: 'value1', somethingelse: 'value2'}} %>

This will generate:

<a href="/link" data-something='value1' data-somethingelse='value2'>Link</a>

This might not exactly be your particular use case, but I found this post while trying to find an answer myself so I thought I'd share my findings.

2
  • 2
    AFAIK, this is specific to the data attributes, if you have other attributes with dashes you have to use the old syntax.
    – lime
    Jul 18, 2013 at 15:13
  • 1
    The HAML documentation mentions data attributes separately. As a bonus, you can get multiple dashes by using underscores: data: {author_id: 123}. Great stuff.
    – lime
    Jul 18, 2013 at 15:15
11

As of Ruby 2.2, you also can use following syntax:

{a: 1, b: 2, 'c-c': 3, d: 4}
4

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