14

The DbSet<TEntity>.Add method returns an entity. I would normally have expected an Add operation to have a void return type.

When I look at the EntityFramework source code, I see the following implementation:

    public virtual TEntity Add(TEntity entity)
    {
        Check.NotNull(entity, "entity");

        GetInternalSetWithCheck("Add").Add(entity);
        return entity;
    }

GetInternalSetWithCheck returns an InternalSet<TEntity>

The Add method of InternalSet<TEntity> interestingly enough has a void return type in its signature:

public virtual void Add(object entity)

My concern is whether or not I need to be careful with when I do modifications to an entity with relation to when it is added to a DbSet.

E.g. are there cases where

var entity = new MyEntity();
_dbSet.Add(entity);
entity.SomeDatModifyingMethod();
_dbContext.SaveChanges();

might give different behavior than

var entity = new MyEntity();
entity.SomeDatModifyingMethod();
_dbSet.Add(entity);
_dbContext.SaveChanges();

or different behavior than:

var entity = new MyEntity();
entity = _dbSet.Add(entity);
entity.SomeDatModifyingMethod();
_dbContext.SaveChanges();

In the basic default implementation, it wouldn't ever matter, because it just always returns exactly the same instance. However, the Add method is virtual, so it can be overridden (though in the public source code, the only override is a test double - but I'm not sure that source code actually includes e.g. the SqlServer support implementation).

Why does DbSet Add return an entity instance instead of void?

6

TEntity is a reference type, so what gets added to the InternalSet<T> will be a reference to the entity, not the value. It doesn't matter whether you change the contents of the entity before or after it is added to the set, since it has never been created in the database. One way or another, an INSERT or the equivalent will be performed.

As to why Add returns TEntity, it expect it's because it permits things like:

_dbSet.Add(new MyEntity()).SomeDatModifyingMethod();
_dbContext.SaveChanges();
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  • That mostly makes sense - so long as the Add method will never do something like return a proxy - perhaps for change tracking? - in which case it might be important to reassign the reference after adding? (e.g. last code sample) – Nathan Jan 26 '14 at 3:54
  • Though come to think of it, I don't know why you'd ever need change tracking an a newly added entity... – Nathan Jan 26 '14 at 4:00
  • The Add might not be the last change before the SaveChanges. What if there's a Remove? – John Saunders Jan 26 '14 at 4:02
  • Sorry, when I said it wouldn't need change tracking for an added entity, I meant that it wouldn't need to track the added entity other than for the fact that it is added - meaning that even if you are using EF proxy change tracking, there doesn't seem to be a reason that Add would need to "proxify" the added entity (to track individual property changes) - thus lending credence to your statement that returning the entity is simply for method chaining. – Nathan Jan 26 '14 at 4:25
8

It allows you to write a "Find or Add" pattern

var person = context.People.Find(ssn) ?? context.People.Add(new Person
{
   SocialSecurityNumber = ssn,
   FirstName = "John",
   LastName = "Doe"
});
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