184

Is there any simpler/nicer way of getting a slice of keys from a map in Go?

Currently I am iterating over the map and copying the keys to a slice:

i := 0
keys := make([]int, len(mymap))
for k := range mymap {
    keys[i] = k
    i++
}
  • 8
    The correct answer is no, there is not a simpler/nicer way. – dldnh Mar 16 '18 at 10:30
166

For example,

package main

func main() {
    mymap := make(map[int]string)
    keys := make([]int, 0, len(mymap))
    for k := range mymap {
        keys = append(keys, k)
    }
}

To be efficient in Go, it's important to minimize memory allocations.

  • 20
    It's slightly better to set the actual size instead of capacity and avoid append altogether. See my answer for details. – Vinay Pai Jan 8 '15 at 19:37
  • 3
    Note that if mymap is not a local variable (and is therefore subject to growing/shrinking), this is the only proper solution - it ensures that if the size of mymap changes between the initialization of keys and the for loop, there won't be any out-of-bounds issues. – Melllvar Jul 25 '17 at 21:23
  • 9
    maps are not safe under concurrent access, neither solution is acceptable if another goroutine might change the map. – Vinay Pai Jul 26 '17 at 17:27
  • @VinayPai it is okay to read from a map from multiple goroutines but not write – darethas Dec 1 '17 at 2:38
  • @darethas that is a common misconception. The race detector will flag this usage since 1.6. From the release notes: "As always, if one goroutine is writing to a map, no other goroutine should be reading or writing the map concurrently. If the runtime detects this condition, it prints a diagnosis and crashes the program." golang.org/doc/go1.6#runtime – Vinay Pai Aug 8 '18 at 22:10
311

This is an old question, but here's my two cents. PeterSO's answer is slightly more concise, but slightly less efficient. You already know how big it's going to be so you don't even need to use append:

keys := make([]int, len(mymap))

i := 0
for k := range mymap {
    keys[i] = k
    i++
}

In most situations it probably won't make much of a difference, but it's not much more work, and in my tests (using a map with 1,000,000 random int64 keys and then generating the array of keys ten times with each method), it was about 20% faster to assign members of the array directly than to use append.

Although setting the capacity eliminates reallocations, append still has to do extra work to check if you've reached capacity on each append.

  • 36
    This looks exactly the same as the OP's code. I agree that this is the better way, but I'm curious if I've missed the difference between this answer's code and OP's code. – Emmaly Wilson Mar 8 '15 at 7:32
  • 4
    Good point, I somehow looked at the other answers and missed that my answer is exactly the same as the OP. Oh well, at least we now know approximately what the penalty is for using append unnecessarily :) – Vinay Pai Mar 10 '15 at 14:43
  • 4
    Why aren't you using an index with the range, for i, k := range mymap{. That way you don't need the i++? – mvndaai Apr 29 '16 at 17:57
  • 26
    Maybe I'm missing something here, but if you did i, k := range mymap, then i will be keys and k will be values corresponding to those keys in the map. That won't actually help you populate a slice of keys. – Vinay Pai May 2 '16 at 19:31
  • 3
    @Alaska if you're concerned with the cost of allocating one temporary counter variable, but think a function call is going to take less memory you should educate yourself on what actually happens when a function gets called. Hint: It's not a magical incantation that does things for free. If you think the currently accepted answer is safe under concurrent access, you also need to go back to the basics: blog.golang.org/go-maps-in-action#TOC_6. – Vinay Pai Oct 8 '18 at 23:31
65

You also can take an array of keys with type []Value by method MapKeys of struct Value from package "reflect":

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {
    abc := map[string]int{
        "a": 1,
        "b": 2,
        "c": 3,
    }

    keys := reflect.ValueOf(abc).MapKeys()

    fmt.Println(keys) // [a b c]
}
  • 1
    I think this is a good approach if there is a chance of a concurrent map access: this won't panic if the map grows during the loop. About performance, I'm not really sure, but I suspect it outperforms the append solution. – Atila Romero Aug 8 '18 at 16:28
  • @AtilaRomero Not sure that this solution has any advantages, but when use reflection for any purposes this is more useful, because it allows to take a key as Value typed directly. – Denis Kreshikhin Aug 17 '18 at 9:50
  • 2
    Is there a way to convert this to []string? – Doron Behar May 29 at 15:13
10

A nicer way to do this would be to use append:

keys = []int{}
for k := range mymap {
    keys = append(keys, k)
}

Other than that, you’re out of luck—Go isn’t a very expressive language.

  • 9
    It is less efficient than the original though - append will do multiple allocations to grow the underlying array, and has to update the slice length every call. Saying keys = make([]int, 0, len(mymap)) will get rid of the allocations but I expect it will still be slower. – Nick Craig-Wood Jan 26 '14 at 14:53
  • 1
    This answer is safer than using len(mymap), if someone else changes the map while the copy is beeing made. – Atila Romero Aug 8 '18 at 12:21
6

I made a sketchy benchmark on the three methods described in other responses.

Obviously pre-allocating the slice before pulling the keys is faster than appending, but surprisingly, the reflect.ValueOf(m).MapKeys() method is significantly slower than the latter:

❯ go run scratch.go
populating
filling 100000000 slots
done in 56.630774791s
running prealloc
took: 9.989049786s
running append
took: 18.948676741s
running reflect
took: 25.50070649s

Here's the code: https://play.golang.org/p/Z8O6a2jyfTH (running it in the playground aborts claiming that it takes too long, so, well, run it locally.)

  • 2
    In your keysAppend function, you can set the capacity of the keys array with make([]uint64, 0, len(m)), which drastically changed the performance of that function for me. – keithbhunter Apr 1 at 15:59
  • Excellent point which I always forget. – Nico Villanueva Apr 2 at 17:30
1

Visit https://play.golang.org/p/dx6PTtuBXQW

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sort"
)

func main() {
    mapEg := map[string]string{"c":"a","a":"c","b":"b"}
    keys := make([]string, 0, len(mapEg))
    for k := range mapEg {
        keys = append(keys, k)
    }
    sort.Strings(keys)
    fmt.Println(keys)
}
-1

https://github.com/chenhg5/collection is a package which can help you. like this:

a := map[string]interface{}{
    "name": "mike",
    "sex":  1,
}

fmt.Println(Collect(a).Keys().ToStringArray())

// Output: []string{"name", "sex"}

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