9

First of all, please correct me if "alias" is the wrong word. I am talkin about renaming the column with AS operator.

So I'm trying calculate an average like this :

SELECT
users.username AS player_name,
COUNT(*) AS total_games,
SUM(games.points) AS total_points,
(total_points / total_games) AS average_points

FROM games,
INNER JOIN users
ON games.player_id = users.id
GROUP BY games.player_id

(the query might be wrong, its just a quick example)

in this query, the line

(total_points / total_games) AS average_points

gives an error : unknown column total_points

so how can I fix this to keep using the aliases, instead of writing this :

(SUM(games.points) / COUNT(*) ) AS average_points

Thanks for any help !

2
  • Column alias available only after the SELECT is processed. So Only the ORDER BY has access. In your case, you may need to subquery your COUNT() values with an alias, and later refer in the outer part. Jan 26 '14 at 19:20
  • 1
    similar question answered here Sep 26 '18 at 14:33
8

Unfortunately, you cannot use column aliases this way. They are only available after the SELECT statement is processed. However, you can do it in a subquery or a common table expression (CTE). Here is the simple subquery:

SELECT player_name,
       total_games,
       total_points,
       (total_points / total_games) AS average_points
FROM
 (SELECT
 users.username AS player_name,
 COUNT(*) AS total_games,
 SUM(games.points) AS total_points,

 FROM games,
 INNER JOIN users
 ON games.player_id = users.id
 GROUP BY games.player_id) as InnerQuery
5

I'm fairly sure it's not possible to use aliases like that. You will have to do it the 'long' way...

(SUM(games.points) / COUNT(*) ) AS average_points

Edit: I wanted to edit this answer to second @jbeldock 's answer as a solution I have since used many times myself. I found myself writing out formulas and re-using them in other parts of queries, leading to big messy queries with copy/pasted sections. Putting your forumlas in a subquery allows you to use their results in the outer query and make things more elegant.

1
  • Will there be any difference in performance between the approaches suggested above and by @jbeldock? Nov 8 '19 at 3:42
1

You can't use aliases at the same level they are defined -- you need to put the alias definition in a subquery. But, you don't need aliases, because SQL has the AVG() function:

SELECT users.username AS player_name,
       COUNT(*) AS total_games,
       SUM(games.points) AS total_points,
       AVG(games.points) AS average_points
FROM games INNER JOIN
     users
     ON games.player_id = users.id
GROUP BY games.player_id;

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