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I've just recently switched to a Mac from Ubuntu. I was disappointed that mac doesn't have the convenient sudo apt-get in Ubuntu. I've heard that I should use homebrew but I'm not exactly sure what homebrew or macports does?

closed as off-topic by George Stocker Jul 22 '14 at 17:41

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    much related: apple.stackexchange.com/questions/32724/… – cregox Jun 15 '14 at 22:02
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    This isn't a "general computing" question. Usually if someone is asking for an apt-get equivalent on MacOSX they are trying to setup their machine for development work. Voted to reopen. – Michael Brown Sep 12 '14 at 17:20
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    A few years ago the homebrew front door had a statement that went something like this "homebrew is better because it's written in Ruby". I have nothing against Ruby mind you, not at all. I like oop and ruby is a fine oop language. What I have a problem with is any software developer that thinks one language is better than all others. For that reason alone I have no interest in homebrew. Also, macports has been working fine for me for many years. – Mike Makuch Apr 12 '15 at 3:30
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    Seems about every second question I see these days has been closed by the topic police. – pwray May 20 '16 at 2:11
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    This is exactly the question I need answered and I'm sick and tired of perfectly good questions being closed for the wrong reasons by anal moderators. – jpmartineau Jun 1 '17 at 3:09
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MacPorts is the way to go.

  1. Like @user475443 pointed, MacPorts has many many more packages. With brew you'll find yourself trapped soon because the formula you need doesn't exist.

  2. MacPorts is a native application: C + TCL. You don't need Ruby at all. To install Ruby on Mac OS X you might need MacPorts, so just go with MacPorts and you'll be happy.

  3. MacPorts is really stable, in 8 years I never had a problem with it, and my entire Unix ecosystem relay on it.

  4. If you are a PHP developer you can install the last version of Apache (Mac OS X uses 2.2), PHP and all the extensions you need, then upgrade all with one command. Forget to do the same with Homebrew.

  5. MacPorts support groups.

    foo@macpro:~/ port select --summary
    
    Name        Selected      Options
    ====        ========      =======
    db          none          db46 none
    gcc         none          gcc42 llvm-gcc42 mp-gcc48 none
    llvm        none          mp-llvm-3.3 none
    mysql       mysql56       mysql56 none
    php         php55         php55 php56 none
    postgresql  postgresql94  postgresql93 postgresql94 none
    python      none          python24 python25-apple python26-apple python27 python27-apple none
    

    If you have both PHP55 and PHP56 installed (with many different extensions), you can swap between them with just one command. All the relative extensions are part of the group and they will be activated within the chosen group: php55 or php56. I'm not sure Homebrew has this feature.

  6. Rubists like to rewrite everything in Ruby, because the only thing they are at ease is Ruby itself.

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    Rubists like to rewrite -- hehe, have a look at NodeJS guys implementing binary protocols for MySQL in JS! :) – kolypto Sep 5 '14 at 10:48
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    You do not need MacPorts to install Ruby — Ruby is included with OS X, and brew uses the system Ruby. – Michael Ekstrand Dec 8 '14 at 23:25
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    @Michael Ekstrand OS X doesn't include the last version of Ruby. – noun Dec 8 '14 at 23:58
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    Can't upvote this. It's too snarky, and the snarkiness undermines the information. – OldPeculier Feb 12 '15 at 21:31
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    Upvoting to counter the omitted "anti-snarky" upvotes. Any information received from a human being will always have a natural bias ("snarkiness" in this case). I appreciate this user's perspective, perhaps specifically because the answer doesn't read like a wikipedia entry. – rinogo Mar 23 '15 at 20:24
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Homebrew and macports both solve the same problem - that is the installation of common libraries and utilities that are not bundled with osx.

Typically these are development related libraries and the most common use of these tools is for developers working on osx.

They both need the xcode command line tools installed (which you can download separately from https://developer.apple.com/), and for some specific packages you will need the entire xcode IDE installed.

xcode can be installed from the mac app store, its a free download but it takes a while since its around 5GB (if I remember correctly).

macports is an osx version of the port utility from BSD (as osx is derived from BSD, this was a natural choice). For anyone familiar with any of the BSD distributions, macports will feel right at home.

One major difference between homebrew and macports; and the reason I prefer homebrew is that it will not overwrite things that should be installed "natively" in osx. This means that if there is a native package available, homebrew will notify you instead of overwriting it and causing problems further down the line. It also installs libraries in the user space (thus, you don't need to use "sudo" to install things). This helps when getting rid of libraries as well since everything is in a path accessible to you.

homebrew also enjoys a more active user community and its packages (called formulas) are updated quite often.


macports does not overwrite native OSX packages - it supplies its own version - This is the main reason I prefer macports over home-brew, you need to be certain of what you are using and Apple's change at different times to the ports and have been know to be years behind updates in some projects

Can you give a reference showing that macports overwrites native OS X packages? As far as I can tell, all macports installation happens in /opt/local

Perhaps I should clarify - I did not say anywhere in my answer that macports overwrites OSX native packages. They both install items separately.

Homebrew will warn you when you should install things "natively" (using the library/tool's preferred installer) for better compatibility. This is what I meant. It will also use as many of the local libraries that are available in OS X. From the wiki:

We really don’t like dupes in Homebrew/homebrew

However, we do like dupes in the tap!

Stuff that comes with OS X or is a library that is provided by RubyGems, CPAN or PyPi should not be duped. There are good reasons for this:

  • Duplicate libraries regularly break builds
  • Subtle bugs emerge with duplicate libraries, and to a lesser extent, duplicate tools
  • We want you to try harder to make your formula work with what OS X comes with

You can optionally overwrite the macosx supplied versions of utilities with homebrew.

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    macports does not overwrite native OSX packages - it supplies its own version - This is the main rason I prefer macports over home-brew, you need to be certain of what you are using and Apple's change at different times to the ports and have been know to be ye3srs behind updates in some projects – Mark Feb 26 '14 at 11:43
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    Can you give a reference showing that macports overwrites native OS X packages? As far as I can tell, all macports installation happens in /opt/local – user334856 May 11 '14 at 1:45
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    You did at the least imply very strongly that MacPorts overwrites native OS X packages. Instead of "clarifying" while still pretending you didn't say wrote what you wrote, you should probably edit the sentence in question. – Relaxed Mar 26 '15 at 12:10
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    This sentence, "One major difference between homebrew and macports; and the reason I prefer homebrew is that it will not overwrite things that should be installed "natively" in osx." should be changed to "One major difference between homebrew and macports; and the reason I prefer homebrew is that homebrew won't automatically install parallel copies of tools and libraries that are already provided by Apple." – bgupta Oct 4 '15 at 11:23
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    MacPorts doesn't overwrite native apps, it "Confines ported software to a private “sandbox” that keeps it from intermingling with your operating system and its vendor-supplied software to prevent them from becoming corrupted." - MacPorts Guide, Chapter 1 – jla Jan 12 '16 at 18:30
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Currently, Macports has many more packages (~18.6 K) than there are Homebrew formulae (~3.1K), owing to its maturity. Homebrew is slowly catching up though.

Macport packages tend to be maintained by a single person.

Macports can keep multiple versions of packages around, and you can enable or disable them to test things out. Sometimes this list can get corrupted and you have to manually edit it to get things back in order, although this is not too hard.

Both package managers will ask to be regularly updated. This can take some time.

Note: you can have both package managers on your system! It is not one or the other. Brew might complain but Macports won't.

Also, if you are dealing with python or ruby packages, use a virtual environment wherever possible.

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    {{{ Sometimes this list can get corrupted and you have to manually edit it to get things back in order, although this is not too hard. }}} I have never seen this happen, though that's not to say that it's not possible. What were the circumstances? Did you file a bug (trac.macports.org)? – LSpice Jun 29 '14 at 1:29
  • {{{ Both package managers will ask to be regularly updated. This can take some time. }}} This seems like a strange statement. In several years of use, I only remember upgrading MacPorts itself a few times, and the update is rather quick. Do you mean that the ports themselves have to be updated frequently? Well, they can be, but that's a good thing, not a drawback, I think! Also, it's probably worth noting that MacPorts won't ask to do anything—that is, there's no nagging; you have to ask it about out-of-date packages. – LSpice Jun 29 '14 at 1:32
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By default, Homebrew installs packages to your /usr/local. Macport commands require sudo to install and upgrade (similar to apt-get in Ubuntu).

For more detail:

This site suggests using Hombrew: http://deephill.com/macports-vs-homebrew/

whereas this site lists the advantages of using Macports: http://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=1207907

I also switched from Ubuntu recently, and I enjoy using homebrew (it's simple and easy to use!), but if you feel attached to using sudo, Macports might be the better way to go!

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    Are you saying that homebrew installs things into /usr/local without requiring sudo? – user334856 May 11 '14 at 1:46
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    @NgocPham Do you have a reference for that? – user334856 May 17 '14 at 17:19
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    @Articuno you can reference the Homebrew FAQ page here: github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/wiki/… – Keith May 17 '14 at 18:42
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    @Keith That site is incorrect. Or at least, it is leaving out a major premise. It says "Apple has left this directory for us. Which means there is no /usr/local directory by default, so there is no need to worry about messing up existing tools." Apple has not left /usr/local for Homebrew. Apple has left /usr/local for "executables, libraries, etc. not included by the basic operating system". That means it's possible that tools installed prior to using Homebrew may have created /usr/local such that it can't be modified without sudo. They don't discuss that at the wiki. – user334856 May 17 '14 at 18:47
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    @Articuno I think I got you now. It's just the statement that homebrew can install stuff without sudo because when it set itself up, it used sudo to make the permission on the directory looser so it will be able to do anything inside /usr/local without triggering the password. Does it mean the "install without password" part is wrong? I don't think so! It's still true that homebrew will be able to get stuff without the password. – Ngoc Pham May 20 '14 at 0:30

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