I have the following code:

cvtColor (image, image, CV_BGRA2RGB);
Vec3b bottomRGB;
bottomRGB=image.at<Vec3b>(821,1232);

When I display bottomRGB[0], it displays a value greater than 255. What is the reason for this?

  • The most likely explanation is that your image has a higher bit depth than 8-bit (which ranges from 0-255 for unsigned int).. For details, please refer to the documentation.. – scap3y Jan 27 '14 at 7:05
  • I have tried converting it into CV_8U too but to no help – Khawar Ali Jan 27 '14 at 7:08
  • Could you upload the original image (not using the default uploader but on a site where the properties can be preserved)..? – scap3y Jan 27 '14 at 7:12
  • This is the original image: upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/… – Khawar Ali Jan 27 '14 at 7:15
  • any idea about it? – Khawar Ali Jan 27 '14 at 7:31
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As you have commented, the reason is that you use cout to print its content directly. Here I will try to explain to you why this will not work.

cout << bottomRGB[0] << endl;

Why "cout" works weird for "unsigned char"?

It will not work because here bottomRGB[0] is a unsigned char (with value 218), cout actually will print some garbage value (or nothing) as it is just a non-printable ASCII character which is getting printed anyway. Note that ASCII character corresponding to 218 is non-printable. Check out here for the ASCII table.

P.S. You can check whether bottomRGB[0] is printable or not using isprint() as:

cout << isprint(bottomRGB[0]) << endl; // will print garbage value or nothing

It will print 0 (or false) indicating the character is non-printable


For your example, to make it work, you need to type cast it first before cout:

cout << (int) bottomRGB[0] << endl; // correctly printed (218 for your example) 

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.