SELECT REPLACE('<strong>100</strong><b>.00 GB', '%^(^-?\d*\.{0,1}\d+$)%', '');

I want to replace any markup between two parts of the number with above regex, but it does not seem to work. I'm not sure if it is regex syntax that's wrong because I tried simpler one such as '%[^0-9]%' just to test but it didn't work either. Does anyone know how can I achieve this?

  • 3
    You might want to revisit the answer. – Mukus Apr 11 '14 at 1:25
  • 1
    What do you want the end result to be? Do you expect 100.00 or 100.00 GB? And are there other examples of formatted numbers that do not fit the pattern of the markup only being around the part to the left of the decimal? Can markup be around the entire number such as 100<i>.00</i> GB? Is there always a 2 character currency code on the right? – Solomon Rutzky Apr 11 '14 at 15:39
  • @srutzky I want number with decimal points if there are any, not all values have them, also there is virtually no pattern for these since it is generated but third party html generator. Sometimes currency is in front sometimes after number, sometimes it is symbol -$, sometimes code - USD, with -without spaces.. etc etc . simply very rubbish data – johnyTee May 9 '14 at 14:01
up vote 48 down vote accepted

You can use PATINDEX to find the first index of the pattern (string's) occurrence. Then use STUFF to stuff another string into the pattern(string) matched.

Loop through each row. Replace each illegal characters with what you want. In your case replace non numeric with blank. The inner loop is if you have more than one illegal character in a current cell that of the loop.

DECLARE @counter int

SET @counter = 0

WHILE(@counter < (SELECT MAX(ID_COLUMN) FROM Table))
BEGIN  

    WHILE 1 = 1
    BEGIN
        DECLARE @RetVal varchar(50)

        SET @RetVal =  (SELECT Column = STUFF(Column, PATINDEX('%[^0-9.]%', Column),1, '')
        FROM Table
        WHERE ID_COLUMN = @counter)

        IF(@RetVal IS NOT NULL)       
          UPDATE Table SET
          Column = @RetVal
          WHERE ID_COLUMN = @counter
        ELSE
            break
    END

    SET @counter = @counter + 1
END

Caution: This is slow though! Having a varchar column may impact. So using LTRIM RTRIM may help a bit. Regardless, it is slow.

Credit goes to this StackOverFlow answer.

EDIT Credit also goes to @srutzky

Edit (by @Tmdean) Instead of doing one row at a time, this answer can be adapted to a more set-based solution. It still iterates the max of the number of non-numeric characters in a single row, so it's not ideal, but I think it should be acceptable in most situations.

WHILE 1 = 1 BEGIN
    WITH q AS
        (SELECT ID_Column, PATINDEX('%[^0-9.]%', Column) AS n
        FROM Table)
    UPDATE Table
    SET Column = STUFF(Column, q.n, 1, '')
    FROM q
    WHERE Table.ID_Column = q.ID_Column AND q.n != 0;

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0 BREAK;
END;

You can also improve efficiency quite a lot if you maintain a bit column in the table that indicates whether the field has been scrubbed yet. (NULL represents "Unknown" in my example and should be the column default.)

DECLARE @done bit = 0;
WHILE @done = 0 BEGIN
    WITH q AS
        (SELECT ID_Column, PATINDEX('%[^0-9.]%', Column) AS n
        FROM Table
        WHERE COALESCE(Scrubbed_Column, 0) = 0)
    UPDATE Table
    SET Column = STUFF(Column, q.n, 1, ''),
        Scrubbed_Column = 0
    FROM q
    WHERE Table.ID_Column = q.ID_Column AND q.n != 0;

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0 SET @done = 1;

    -- if Scrubbed_Column is still NULL, then the PATINDEX
    -- must have given 0
    UPDATE table
    SET Scrubbed_Column = CASE
        WHEN Scrubbed_Column IS NULL THEN 1
        ELSE NULLIF(Scrubbed_Column, 0)
    END;
END;

If you don't want to change your schema, this is easy to adapt to store intermediate results in a table valued variable which gets applied to the actual table at the end.

  • I'll try this when I have time, thanks! – johnyTee Apr 11 '14 at 12:58
  • 2
    In order for this solution to work, at the very least you need to add a period to the PATINDEX pattern; it should be: [^0-9.]. If not then you strip out the decimal and turn what should be 100.00 into 10000. – Solomon Rutzky Apr 11 '14 at 15:43
  • @srutzky ok added '.'I was actually working on non-alphabet and thought doing ^0-9 would work. – Mukus Apr 12 '14 at 0:07
  • +1 for effort, but (as you also pointed) this would make reports run way too long, they're slow as they are ... but for smaller data this is an excellent solution! – johnyTee May 9 '14 at 14:06
  • 1
    I just worked on something similar to this so I'm going to update the answer with a faster solution. It's still not ideal but performance should be acceptable in most situations. – Tmdean Jun 30 '15 at 22:25

In a general sense, SQL Server does not support regular expressions and you cannot use them in the native T-SQL code.

You could write a CLR function to do that. See here, for example.

  • 1
    OK, that seems to be only way to go then... Thanks – johnyTee Jan 27 '14 at 10:30

Instead of stripping out the found character by its sole position, using Replace(Column, BadFoundCharacter, '') could be substantially faster. Additionally, instead of just replacing the one bad character found next in each column, this replaces all those found.

WHILE 1 = 1 BEGIN
    UPDATE dbo.YourTable
    SET Column = Replace(Column, Substring(Column, PatIndex('%[^0-9.-]%', Column), 1), '')
    WHERE Column LIKE '%[^0-9.-]%'
    If @@RowCount = 0 BREAK;
END;

I am convinced this will work better than the accepted answer, if only because it does fewer operations. There are other ways that might also be faster, but I don't have time to explore those right now.

  • Looks interesting, I don't have time to try it right now but will do when I have. Cheers – johnyTee Jan 14 '16 at 13:44
  • 4
    This helped me on a somewhat unrelated problem. I used your Replace(Column, Substring(Column, PatIndex('%[^0-9.-]%', Column), 1), '') bit on a select query. So, thanks! – jyoseph Dec 2 '16 at 18:00
  • 1
    @jyoseph Great! Just be aware that this will only remove all instances of a particular bad character, and has to be run repeatedly if the set of bad characters is greater than one... – ErikE Dec 2 '16 at 18:02
  • @ErikE Thanks for the heads up! I used it to query a column which has phone numbers (modified the pattern slightly to %[^0-9]%) in order to strip out anything that is not numeric. So a user could query 333-1234 and it would match phone numbers inputted as 3331234. If I understand correctly, you're saying that in the case where the phone number is (333)-333-1234, it would only strip the first "("? I'll have to test that a bit more. – jyoseph Dec 3 '16 at 20:37
  • Correct. You could install a CLR module. Or ideally just do it in program code. – ErikE Dec 3 '16 at 20:41

Here is a recursive function I wrote to accomplish this based off of the previous answers.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.RecursiveReplace
(
    @P_String VARCHAR(MAX),
    @P_Pattern VARCHAR(MAX),
    @P_ReplaceString VARCHAR(MAX),
    @P_ReplaceLength INT = 1
)
RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX)
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Index INT;

    -- Get starting point of pattern
    SET @Index = PATINDEX(@P_Pattern, @P_String);

    IF @Index > 0
    BEGIN
        -- Perform the replace
        SET @P_String = STUFF(@P_String, PATINDEX(@P_Pattern, @P_String), @P_ReplaceLength, @P_ReplaceString);

        -- Recurse
        SET @P_String = dbo.RecursiveReplace(@P_String, @P_Pattern, @P_ReplaceString, @P_ReplaceLength);
    END;

    RETURN @P_String;
END;

Gist

Wrapping the solution inside a SQL function could be useful if you want to reuse it. I'm even doing it at the cell level, that's why I'm putting this as a different answer:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fnReplaceInvalidChars] (@string VARCHAR(300))
RETURNS VARCHAR(300)
BEGIN
    DECLARE @str VARCHAR(300) = @string;
    DECLARE @Pattern VARCHAR (20) = '%[^a-zA-Z0-9]%';
    DECLARE @Len INT;
    SELECT @Len = LEN(@String); 
    WHILE @Len > 0 
    BEGIN
        SET @Len = @Len - 1;
        IF (PATINDEX(@Pattern,@str) > 0)
            BEGIN
                SELECT @str = STUFF(@str, PATINDEX(@Pattern,@str),1,'');    
            END
        ELSE
        BEGIN
            BREAK;
        END
    END     
    RETURN @str
END

If you are doing this just for a parameter coming into a Stored Procedure, you can use the following:

while PatIndex('%[^0-9]%', @Param) > 0
    select  @Param = Replace(@Param, Substring(@Param, PatIndex('%[^0-9]%', @Param), 1), '')

I stumbled across this post looking for something else but thought I'd mention a solution I use which is far more efficient - and really should be the default implementation of any function when used with a set based query - which is to use a cross applied table function. Seems the topic is still active so hopefully this is useful to someone.

Example runtime on a few of the answers so far based on running recursive set based queries or scalar function, based on 1m rows test set removing the chars from a random newid, ranges from 34s to 2m05s for the WHILE loop examples and from 1m3s to {forever} for the function examples.

Using a table function with cross apply achieves the same goal in 10s. You may need to adjust it to suit your needs such as the max length it handles.

Function:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[RemoveChars](@InputUnit VARCHAR(40))
RETURNS TABLE
AS
RETURN
    (
        WITH Numbers_prep(Number) AS
            (
                SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1
            )
        ,Numbers(Number) AS
            (
                SELECT TOP (ISNULL(LEN(@InputUnit),0))
                    row_number() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT NULL))
                FROM Numbers_prep a
                    CROSS JOIN Numbers_prep b
            )
        SELECT
            OutputUnit
        FROM
            (
                SELECT
                    substring(@InputUnit,Number,1)
                FROM  Numbers
                WHERE substring(@InputUnit,Number,1) like '%[0-9]%'
                ORDER BY Number
                FOR XML PATH('')
            ) Sub(OutputUnit)
    )

Usage:

UPDATE t
SET column = o.OutputUnit
FROM ##t t
CROSS APPLY [dbo].[RemoveChars](t.column) o

I think a simpler and faster approach is iterate by each character of the alphabet:

DECLARE @i int
SET @i = 0

WHILE(@i < 256)
BEGIN  

    IF char(@i) NOT IN ('0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '.')      

      UPDATE Table SET Column = replace(Column, char(@i), '')

    SET @i = @i + 1

END

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.