I am trying to find a nice way to restore the SSH agent when I reconnect a disconnected tmux session.

The cause seems to be that the SSH agent session changes but the environment variable from the tmux session is not updated.

How can I automate this, before attaching the session itself? Because the session I am attaching to does not always have a bash prompt, so I cannot afford to type something inside it. It has to be something to run before creating or attaching the tmux session.

An example of the code I'm running is at https://gist.github.com/ssbarnea/8646491 -- a small ssh wrapper that is using tmux to create persistem ssh connections. This works quite well, but sometimes the ssh agent stops working so I am no longer able to use it to connect to other hosts.

  • You probably should mark pymkin's response as the answer. – David Sanders Dec 29 '14 at 18:52

There's an excellent gist by Martijn Vermaat, which addresses your problem in great depth, although it is intended for screen users, so I'm adjusting it for tmux here.

To summarize:

  1. create ~/.ssh/rc if it doesn't exist yet, and add the following content:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    # Fix SSH auth socket location so agent forwarding works with tmux
    if test "$SSH_AUTH_SOCK" ; then
      ln -sf $SSH_AUTH_SOCK ~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock
    fi
    
  2. Make it work in tmux, add this to your ~/.tmux.conf:

    # fix ssh agent when tmux is detached
    setenv -g SSH_AUTH_SOCK $HOME/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock
    

Extra work is required if you want to enable X11 forwarding, see the gist.

  • When reconnecting to tmux, it doesn't update to the newest ssh_auth_sock... it stays with the one that originally created the session, so this doesn't work. Any ideas? – Bret Feb 22 '15 at 0:35
  • 6
    I had to add a set -g update-environment -r to the .tmux in order to get this process to work. I also added some namespacing to the socket link creation: gist.github.com/bcomnes/e756624dc1d126ba2eb6 – Bret Feb 22 '15 at 1:55
  • 1
    Fixed an error with the previous GIST: had change $(hostname) to $HOSTNAME in the .screenrc and .tmux.conf files – Bret Feb 22 '15 at 20:08
  • 2
    @Bret Your solution works fine if you detach from a tmux session, and then close SSH connection. However, it does not work if you close the ssh connection forcefully, still being attached to a tmux session (e.g. when you suddenly loose network connection and close SSH connection with [Shift ~][Enter]. Any ideas what could fix this? – Andriy Yurchuk Apr 19 '17 at 9:03
  • 1
    No, I gave up sorry. – Bret Jun 21 at 16:49

While tmux updates SSH variables by default, there is no need to

  • change/add socket path
  • change the SSH_AUTH_SOCKET variable

I like the solution by Chris Down which I changed to add function

fixssh() {
    eval $(tmux show-env    \
        |sed -n 's/^\(SSH_[^=]*\)=\(.*\)/export \1="\2"/p')
}

into ~/.bashrc. Call fixssh after attaching session or before ssh/scp/rsync.

Newer versions of tmux support -s option for show-env, so only

eval $(tmux show-env -s |grep '^SSH_')

is possible.

  • Thanks a lot, this is what worked for me! :) However, one small problem: when doing this in a reattached tmux pane, it doesn't work. I need to close the old pane, and open a new one. A fix for this is to detach tmux, show the $DISPLAY variable, reattach tmux, and set $DISPLAY correctly, in my case export DISPLAY=localhost:14.0, but the number seems to change at each ssh session. – PlasmaBinturong Sep 30 '16 at 12:07
  • "While tmux updates SSH variables by default" What are you talking about? (I suspect that the anchor in your link is now nonexistent. – Bruno Bronosky Jun 26 at 19:38
  • 1
    @BrunoBronosky I fixed his link. You were right: anchor no longer existed. Looks to have a stable form now. – overthink Aug 21 at 14:04

Here's what I use for updating SSH_AUTH_SOCK inside a tmux window (based on Hans Ginzel's script):

alias fixssh='eval $(tmux showenv -s SSH_AUTH_SOCK)'

Or for tmux that does not have showenv -s:

alias fixssh='export $(tmux showenv SSH_AUTH_SOCK)'

Here is my solution which includes both approaches, and does not require extra typing when I reconnect to tmux session

alias ssh='[ -n "$TMUX" ] && eval $(tmux showenv -s SSH_AUTH_SOCK); /usr/bin/ssh'
  • 1
    It looks like it will execute eval $(tmux showenv -s SSH_AUTH_SOCK) in local, not remote! – acgtyrant Jun 25 at 6:56

I use a variation of the previous answers:

eval "export $(tmux show-environment -g SSH_AUTH_SOCK)"

assuming that you did the ssh agent started from the outer environment. Same goes for other environment variables such as DISPLAY.

There are lots of good answers here. But there are cases where tmux show-environment doesn't see SSH_AUTH_SOCK. In that case you can use find to locate it explicitly.

export SSH_AUTH_SOCK=$(find /tmp -path '*/ssh-*' -name 'agent*' -uid $(id -u) 2>/dev/null | tail -n1)

That's long and complicated, so I'll break it down...

01  export SSH_AUTH_SOCK=$(
02    find /tmp \
03      -path '*/ssh-*'
04      -name 'agent*'
05      -uid $(id -u)
06      2>/dev/null
07    | tail -n1
08  )
  1. export the SSH_AUTH_SOCK environment variable set to the output of the $() command substitution
  2. find files starting in /tmp
  3. limit results to only those with /ssh- in the path
  4. limit results to only those whose name begins with agent
  5. limit results to only those with a user id matching the current user
  6. silence all (permissions, etc.) errors
  7. take only the last result if there are multiple

You may be able to leave off 6 & 7 if you know that there will only be 1 result and you don't care about stderr garbage.

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