19

I'm using a very simple asp.net mvc application with Entity Framework 6.0.2, .Net 4.5.1:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
   public ActionResult Index()
   {
      int count;
      using (var db = new LocalContext())
      {
         count = db.Counters.Count();
      }
      return View(count);
   }
}

public class Counter
{
   public int Id { get; set; }
}

public class LocalContext : DbContext
{
   public DbSet<Counter> Counters { get; set; }
}

If I do a load test on it, I eventually get an Out Of Memory Exception. (tinyget -srv:localhost -port:<port> -uri:/home/index/ -threads:30 -loop:5000). In Performance monitor I see the generation 2 Heap steadily grow. If I use a smaller loop value (say 500), the size grows until tinyget stops. Then the heap size stays the same (for at least 20 minutes, after that I stopped the server).

What am I doing wrong?

EDIT

So I tried Simon Mouriers suggestion and left out the EF code. Then I don't have memory problems. So I thought, maybe if I use Release instead of Debug, it will make a difference. And it did! Memory was released after a while and I could put high load on the site. Then I switched back to Debug to see if I could get more info and... even in Debug mode no problems anymore. FML, I worked a day on it and now I can't reproduce it anymore.

12
  • 2
    I'd say your not doing anything wrong, more than likely this is a problem with EF's over-bloated codebase. – mxmissile Jan 27 '14 at 15:22
  • I can't find anything wrong either, I just think it's very strange the memory usage isn't going down. – John Landheer Jan 27 '14 at 20:08
  • Presumably replacing the code with int count = 0; return View(count); doesn't demonstrate the problem which suggests its EF not something else? – ta.speot.is Jan 30 '14 at 6:21
  • 1
    You might have stumbled upon a bug in EF 6, try to downgrade to EF 5. If you can confirm this to be a change between EF 5 and 6, I think M$ would be happy to hear from you (ref. entityframework.codeplex.com/workitem/1605 - last comments) – Frode Nilsen Jan 30 '14 at 7:36
  • 1
    Looks like you might be hitting this: entityframework.codeplex.com/workitem/1605 – stames Feb 3 '14 at 19:36
4

In your case the internally managed class that inherits from DbContext would then need to implement IDisposable and inside of the LocalContext add the following:

public void Dispose()
{
    this.Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
     if (disposing)
     {
        // Manage any native resources.
     }
   //Handle any other cleanup.
}

Without specifically overriding the call to dispose, the using statement is only going to call Dispose() against the base class, while you need to dispose of the parent and base.

0

This might not be the correct answer, but i suggest to keep your context managed by a IoC container. And add it with TrasientScope, or PerHttpRequest scope(example not provided due to a large varierty of ioc container syntax). If you want a specfic example, please reply for what DI you want

2
  • In the code shown the context is scoped per request. This is the simplest example I could come up with, DI would only complicate it in this case. – John Landheer Feb 5 '14 at 7:03
  • 1
    Then it must be a resource that isn`t disposed, thus its parents objects are not collected. GC colects only the resources that has no references. You must see what is left undisposed.I preffer to use an IoC container because it does almost all the dirty work for me, this is why i recomanded it to you – Florin V Feb 5 '14 at 7:44
0

Actually, the OutOfMemotyException is normal in this situation since the Garbage Collector does not occur immediately after you've finished with the object. In this scenario, you need to use GC.Collect() to perform a collection on all generations of memory and reclaim all memory that is inaccessible, immediately.

public class HomeController : Controller
{
   public ActionResult Index()
   {
      int count;
      using (var db = new LocalContext())
      {
         count = db.Counters.Count();
      }

      GC.Collect();
      return View(count);
   }
}

Note that you should not use GC.Collect() in production code since it interferes with the Garbage Collection mechanism.

1
  • 2
    This is at best treating symptoms and ignoring the underlying problem. The problem has to be a Dispose pattern issue or some other form of dangling reference. It could be a bug in EF. It could even be some obscure issue where .NET itself got sideways. Note that the OP said that after building Release then switching back to Debug, the issue could not be reproduced. – Craig Feb 23 '14 at 20:51
0

I would go for creating a class connection to the DB ..

public class DBconnection : IDisposable
{
    private ChatEntities _db = new ChatEntities();

    protected ChatEntities Db {
        get { return _db; }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_db != null)
        {
            _db.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Then when you would like to connect and manipulate .. Lets call it the DBlogic class ..

public class DBlogic : DBconnection
{
       internal void WriteToDB(String str){
          //Do something ...

          Db.SaveChanges();
        }
}

This will eventually cause the Dispose to empty resources.. plus its cleaner .. at least for my eyes :D

2
0

I don't see anything wrong with your code. Maybe this could be an issue with the underlying ADO.NET provider. Which database are you using?

I remember having issues with some unit test that did not release SQLite database files which I eventually solved with this code (in my DbContext class)

public class LocalContext : DbContext
{
    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        var connection = this.Database.Connection;
        base.Dispose(disposing);
        connection.Dispose();
    }
}

May be unrelated but I would give it a try.

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