169

How do you check whether a string contains only numbers?

I've given it a go here. I'd like to see the simplest way to accomplish this.

import string

def main():
    isbn = input("Enter your 10 digit ISBN number: ")
    if len(isbn) == 10 and string.digits == True:
        print ("Works")
    else:
        print("Error, 10 digit number was not inputted and/or letters were inputted.")
        main()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
    input("Press enter to exit: ")
4
  • 1
    Your code will always return False since string.digits == True always evaluates to False. Jan 27, 2014 at 18:23
  • 1
    Except the answers below, a "Non Pythonic" way is if [x for x in isbn if x in '0123456789']; that you can extend if the user put separators in isbn - add them to list
    – cox
    Jan 27, 2014 at 18:24
  • 1
    I recommend using regex if you are reading ISBN numbers. ISBNs can be either 10 or 13 digits long, and have additional restrictions. There is a good list of regex commands for matching them here: regexlib.com/… Many of these will also let you correctly read the ISBN hyphens, which will make it easier for people to copy and paste.
    – Kevin
    Jan 27, 2014 at 18:25
  • 1
    @Kevin And, while 13-digit ISBNs are indeed digits only, 10-digit ISBNs can have X as the final character.
    – TRiG
    Mar 24, 2017 at 11:34

12 Answers 12

293

You'll want to use the isdigit method on your str object:

if len(isbn) == 10 and isbn.isdigit():

From the isdigit documentation:

str.isdigit()

Return True if all characters in the string are digits and there is at least one character, False otherwise. Digits include decimal characters and digits that need special handling, such as the compatibility superscript digits. This covers digits which cannot be used to form numbers in base 10, like the Kharosthi numbers. Formally, a digit is a character that has the property value Numeric_Type=Digit or Numeric_Type=Decimal.

2
  • 28
    Worth noting that this may not be the check you actually want. This checks that all characters are digit-like, not that the string is a parseable number. For example, the string " ⁰" (that is a unicode superscript zero), does pass isdigit, but raises a ValueError if passed to int().
    – danpalmer
    Mar 4, 2019 at 12:04
  • Thanks for the very relevant comment @danpalmer. I wanted to make sure my string is an integer (positive or negative) only, so I needed to do something more explicit as in here
    – GreenEye
    Nov 23, 2020 at 16:57
51

Use str.isdigit:

>>> "12345".isdigit()
True
>>> "12345a".isdigit()
False
>>>
2
  • I had no idea that method existed. I've always done try: assert str(int(foo)) == foo; except (AssertionError,ValueError): #handle and it felt ugly as sin. Thanks!
    – Adam Smith
    Jan 27, 2014 at 18:23
  • Keep in mind "²".isdigit() (the 2 superscript) returns True but int("²") errors. May 17, 2021 at 22:45
15

Use string isdigit function:

>>> s = '12345'
>>> s.isdigit()
True
>>> s = '1abc'
>>> s.isdigit()
False
9

You can also use the regex,

import re

eg:-1) word = "3487954"

re.match('^[0-9]*$',word)

eg:-2) word = "3487.954"

re.match('^[0-9\.]*$',word)

eg:-3) word = "3487.954 328"

re.match('^[0-9\.\ ]*$',word)

As you can see all 3 eg means that there is only no in your string. So you can follow the respective solutions given with them.

1
  • 1
    re.match('^[0-9\.]*$',word) fails for floats. if(bool(re.search(r'\d', word))) works fine though.
    – user5512021
    Feb 13, 2019 at 18:35
4

As pointed out in this comment How do you check in python whether a string contains only numbers? the isdigit() method is not totally accurate for this use case, because it returns True for some digit-like characters:

>>> "\u2070".isdigit() # unicode escaped 'superscript zero' 
True

If this needs to be avoided, the following simple function checks, if all characters in a string are a digit between "0" and "9":

import string

def contains_only_digits(s):
    # True for "", "0", "123"
    # False for "1.2", "1,2", "-1", "a", "a1"
    for ch in s:
        if not ch in string.digits:
            return False
    return True

Used in the example from the question:

if len(isbn) == 10 and contains_only_digits(isbn):
    print ("Works")
1
  • 1
    It's a small thing, but the function can be simplified to all(ch in string.digits for ch in s).
    – AMC
    Jun 2, 2020 at 23:09
3

What about of float numbers, negatives numbers, etc.. All the examples before will be wrong.

Until now I got something like this, but I think it could be a lot better:

'95.95'.replace('.','',1).isdigit()

will return true only if there is one or no '.' in the string of digits.

'9.5.9.5'.replace('.','',1).isdigit()

will return false

1
  • All the examples before will be wrong. Isn't that because the question is about something else?
    – AMC
    Jun 2, 2020 at 23:21
2

As every time I encounter an issue with the check is because the str can be None sometimes, and if the str can be None, only use str.isdigit() is not enough as you will get an error

AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'isdigit'

and then you need to first validate the str is None or not. To avoid a multi-if branch, a clear way to do this is:

if str and str.isdigit():

Hope this helps for people have the same issue like me.

1
  • Actually, isdigit ensures that str is truthy, since isdigit returns False if it does not have at least one character. So you could remove the str if you wanted to go with isdigit. Jun 22, 2021 at 7:16
1

You can use try catch block here:

s="1234"
try:
    num=int(s)
    print "S contains only digits"
except:
    print "S doesn't contain digits ONLY"
3
  • this only works with integers, with float numbers will always fail since it contains a (.)
    – Eddwin Paz
    Jun 24, 2016 at 9:17
  • 3
    In addition, it is always a bad practice not to specify which exception you want to handle. In this case it should be: except ValueError:
    – J0ANMM
    Jan 24, 2017 at 9:11
  • This isn't correct though, no? int("1_000") doesn't lead to an error, for example.
    – AMC
    Jun 2, 2020 at 23:08
1

There are 2 methods that I can think of to check whether a string has all digits of not

Method 1(Using the built-in isdigit() function in python):-

>>>st = '12345'
>>>st.isdigit()
True
>>>st = '1abcd'
>>>st.isdigit()
False

Method 2(Performing Exception Handling on top of the string):-

st="1abcd"
try:
    number=int(st)
    print("String has all digits in it")
except:
    print("String does not have all digits in it")

The output of the above code will be:

String does not have all digits in it
1
1

you can use str.isdigit() method or str.isnumeric() method

1
0

Solution:

def main():
    isbn = input("Enter your 10 digit ISBN number: ")
    try:
        int(isbn)
        is_digit = True
    except ValueError:
        is_digit = False
    if len(isbn) == 10 and is_digit:
        print ("Works")
    else:
        print("Error, 10 digit number was not inputted and/or letters were inputted.")
        main()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
    input("Press enter to exit: ")
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Jul 25, 2022 at 8:53
0

You can use this one too:

re.match(r'^[\d]*$' , YourString) 
2
  • Why is there an f at the start? If this is an f-string, there is no var to replace. Or do you mean r'...' for a raw string? It's actually better not to make this an f-string. Jul 16, 2022 at 11:21
  • Right, because you don't need this to be an f-string. You don't need the f at the start. Jul 18, 2022 at 0:41

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