3

Given a matrix as vector of vectors in clojure:

(def A [[1  2  3  4] 
        [5  6  7  8] 
        [9  10 11 12] 
        [13 14 15 16]])

I want to have it split into four quarters:

'([[1 2] 
   [5 6]]    ; tl
  [[3 4] 
   [7 8]]    ; tr
  [[9 10]
   [13 14]]  ; bl
  [[11 12] 
   [15 16]]) ;br

The stupid approach goes like this (inspired by haskells submatrix):

(defn submatrix [A slice-col slice-row]
  (let [tl (map (fn [col] (take slice-col col)) (take slice-row A))
        tr (map (fn [col] (take slice-col col)) (drop slice-row A))
        bl (map (fn [col] (drop slice-col col)) (take slice-row A))
        br (map (fn [col] (drop slice-col col)) (drop slice-row A))]
    (vector tl tr bl br))
)

This works (except that its based on lists instead of vectors) but is not very pretty in terms of functional programming.

Another approach that feels more natural with clojure but got me stuck:

;; just a helper, simmilar to split-at but returns vectors instead
(defn split-at' [idx v] [(subvec v 0 idx) (subvec v idx)])

(defn mquarter [A]
(let [cuts (map (fn [col] (split-at' 1 col)) A)] ; 1 is just for testing and will be a parameter later ... 
 (prn cuts) ; do something clever here like (map (fn [row] .. take .. drop ..) cuts)
))

If i call it e.g like (mquarter [[1 2 3 4] [5 6 7 8] [9 10 11 12] [13 14 15 16]]) it gives me ([[1] [2 3 4]] [[5] [6 7 8]] [[9] [10 11 12]] [[13] [14 15 16]]). That is nice but i dont see how to merge the cuts into a new vector that has the expected structure.

Is there a clever clojure way to merge the cuts into the expected structure that contains my four quarters? The desired collection has quite a different structure than the input vector A, so i wonder whether it's even possible to transform A like this.

Note: I know there are libraries already doing this, i want to do it for the purpose of learning clojure.

Update: I did a quick performance comparison of the presented methods http://git.io/lAZ5OA with these result:

Elapsed time: 9.618612 msecs
Elapsed time: 8294.234684 msecs (is update-in that slow?)
Elapsed time: 4.223093 msecs by a-webb
Elapsed time: 8.166612 msecs
Elapsed time: 0.046654 msecs by andrew-myers (it is executed lazy right!?)
2
  • Can you elaborate on what you mean is not very pretty in terms of *functional programming*?
    – asm
    Jan 27, 2014 at 19:35
  • You see my stupid solution? Its looks like imperative copy'n'paste, with functional i mean more like in one flow with compositions, mappings, subsets and so on.
    – the dude
    Jan 28, 2014 at 7:24

5 Answers 5

7

Using core.matrix, the submatrix function will do exactly what you want:

(submatrix A 0 2 0 2)
=> #<NDWrapper [[1 2] [5 6]]>

Note: the NDWrapper is just a lightweight view object that indexes into the original array. This is done because it's more memory efficient, although it's very unlikely to matter for small matrices like this.

If you want to get the four quarters as a sequence, just do something like:

(for [[i j] [[0 0] [0 2] [2 0] [2 2]]] 
  (submatrix A i 2 j 2))
2
  • No problem. Unless you're doing this for fun/educational reasons though you should definitely use a library in general for this kind of stuff. No point reinventing the wheel!
    – mikera
    Jan 28, 2014 at 8:29
  • Yepp, thanks anyway! Algebra is really fun to do in fn-languages imho! Regards!
    – the dude
    Jan 28, 2014 at 8:50
5

Your helper renamed:

(defn vec-split-at [idx v] [(subvec v 0 idx) (subvec v idx)])

Using your helper to partition a matrix:

(defn partition-matrix-at [m row col] 
  (mapcat (partial apply map vector) 
          (vec-split-at row (mapv (partial vec-split-at col) m))))

Example on A as above:

(partition-matrix-at A 2 2)
 => ([[1 2] 
      [5 6]] 
     [[3 4] 
      [7 8]] 
     [[9 10] 
      [13 14]] 
     [[11 12] 
      [15 16]])
0
1

Here is a simplification of the version inspired by submatrix

(def A [[1  2  3  4] 
        [5  6  7  8] 
        [9  10 11 12] 
        [13 14 15 16]])

(let [inner [take take drop drop]
      outer [take drop take drop]]
 (vector (map (fn [i o] 
                (map (fn [sub] (i 2 sub)) (o 2 A)));; Repetition from submatrix
              inner outer)))

This simply factors out the calls to take and drop into a pair of vectors. We then map over these vectors in sequence applying the functions to the matrix.

2
  • (vec (for [i [take drop], o [take drop]] (map ...)))
    – amalloy
    Jan 27, 2014 at 22:28
  • @amalloy Thanks, this is literally the first piece of clojure code I've ever written :) Not a big deal, but your version does not appear to give the results in the same order.
    – asm
    Jan 27, 2014 at 22:59
1

So,we have a matrix, which is a vector of vectors:

(def A [[1  2  3  4] 
        [5  6  7  8] 
        [9  10 11 12] 
        [13 14 15 16]])

And we know how to split a vector at a given position:

(defn vec-split [idx v] ; split vector
  [(subvec v 0 idx) (subvec v idx)])

Now we want to split a matrix. But instead of splitting it both horisontally and vertically lets first try to split it along one dimension.

Horisontal split is a piece of cake:

(defn mat-splith [idx m] ; split matrix horisontally
  (vec-split idx m))

Vertical split should look somewhat similar. But its not enough to split every line of a matrix, so we need some magical function to reorder splitted strings into new matrices:

(defn transpose [m]
  (mapv (fn [i] (mapv #(nth % i) m))
        (range (count (first m)))))

Now we are able to split our matrix vertically:

(defn mat-splitv [idx m] ; split matrix vertically
  (transpose (mapv (partial vec-split idx) m)))

And now the last bit:

(defn mat-split [vidx hidx m] ; split matrix along both dimensions
  (vec (mapcat (partial mat-splitv vidx)
               (mat-splith hidx m))))

It works like a charm:

=> (mat-split 2 2 A)
[[[1  2]  [5  6]]
 [[3  4]  [7  8]]
 [[9  10] [13 14]]
 [[11 12] [15 16]]]
1
  • Thanks for this very detailed explanation!
    – the dude
    Jan 28, 2014 at 7:28
1

Here's a possible implementation using reduce.

The reducing function f checks what row it is currently processing so that, based on its index and the matrix's height, it can decide whether the row is on the top or bottom half. The row itself is always split in half, which correspond to the left and right hemispheres so that part is easy to determine. Based on this information (top/bottom and left/right) you know where on the quarter accumulator it needs to add the to halves of the row.

(def A [[1  2  3  4] 
        [5  6  7  8] 
        [9  10 11 12] 
        [13 14 15 16]])

(defn mquarter [A]
  (let [[h w] ((juxt count (comp count first)) A)
        f     (fn [quarters [i row]]
                (let [[l r]   (map vec (split-at (/ w 2) row))
                      [hl hr] (if (< i (/ h 2)) [0 1] [2 3])]
                  (-> quarters
                    (update-in [hl] conj l)
                    (update-in [hr] conj r))))
        quarters [[][][][]]]
    (reduce f quarters (map-indexed vector A))))

(mquarter A)

;=> [[[1 2]   [5 6]] 
;=>  [[3 4]   [7 8]]
;=>  [[9 10]  [13 14]]
;=>  [[11 12] [15 16]]]
0

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