7

I want to write a regex in re.VERBOSE mode, but I'm not confident that I'll add the verbose part without error.

I remember that, theoretically, the equivalence of two regexes (without backreferences, at least) can be found by generating their automata and trying to find a graph bijection. But there's no instance method I can see for comparing regexes.

Is there a way to either generate the automaton of a regex or directly compare them, preferably with the standard library?

(I've already decided on a different solution to my problem, but this is still of interest to me.)

6

You can use the undocumented re.DEBUG feature:

>>> r1 = re.compile("foo[bar]baz", re.DEBUG)
literal 102
literal 111
literal 111
in
  literal 98
  literal 97
  literal 114
literal 98
literal 97
literal 122
>>> r2 = re.compile("""foo   # foo!
...                    [bar] # b or a or r!
...                    baz   # baz!""", re.VERBOSE|re.DEBUG)
literal 102
literal 111
literal 111
in
  literal 98
  literal 97
  literal 114
literal 98
literal 97
literal 122

If the output is identical, r1 and r2 are identical as well.

  • More underdocumented than documented. Also, while trying to write a function to check equality of regexes, I found that, due to re.compile caching its results, re.DEBUG might not give output. And that it's not theoretical equivalence of regex, so this only works for re.VERBOSE changes. Here is my implementation, with examples: pastebin.com/DeCWLmF8 (Feel free to add from this comment to your answer.) – leewz Jan 28 '14 at 21:44
  • I'm disappointed that re doesn't save the debug output, and that I can't force a recompile with re.DEBUG. – leewz Jan 28 '14 at 21:47
  • 1
    Raised an issue about re.DEBUG not forcing a recompile: bugs.python.org/issue20426 – leewz Jan 28 '14 at 22:12
  • @leewangzhong: consider raising a bug for adding a method for this like re.compile(ur'yada').equivalent(re.compile(ur'yada')) :) – Mr_and_Mrs_D Jun 25 '15 at 12:54
  • You mean a feature request? – leewz Jun 25 '15 at 15:45

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