9

I want to throttle the speed of an event, How I can achieve this without using Microsoft Rx framework. I had done this with the help of Rx. But what I am trying is, I need to throttle Map's View changed event based on a time slot. Is it possible to implement the same without using Rx.

I am not allowed to use Rx and I have to keep the binary size as small as possible.

  • You should at least constrain the problem by explaining what's wrong with Rx and what properties the solution needs to have, otherwise the question is just too broad. My first reaction right now is this: If Rx works (and it does so elegantly) then why reinvent the wheel? – James World Jan 28 '14 at 10:00
  • The issue is due to some reasons, I can't include the Rx Library to my project. So only for achieving this, adding such a big library seems odd. – user3064847 Jan 28 '14 at 10:03
  • 2
    Any reason for down vote? I am asking for an alternative method. What is wrong with it? – user3064847 Jan 28 '14 at 10:05
  • If I was you I'd revisit the question of using a library that gives you what you need. It's < 1Mb. To hack out error free code in SO to reproduce the same functionality doesn't seem a productive use of time to me. At the very least, give it a go yourself and show some code if you get stuck. – James World Jan 28 '14 at 10:09
  • 2
    Just use your own timer. Enable it when you get the changed event. Disable it when it ticks and do your stuff. – Hans Passant Jan 28 '14 at 10:25
16

This works, if your event is of type EventHandler<EventArgs> for example. It creates a wrapper for your event handler that is throttled:

private EventHandler<EventArgs> CreateThrottledEventHandler(
    EventHandler<EventArgs> handler, 
    TimeSpan throttle)
{   
    bool throttling = false;
    return (s,e) =>
    {
        if(throttling) return;              
        handler(s,e);
        throttling = true;
        Task.Delay(throttle).ContinueWith(_ => throttling = false);
    };
}

Attach like this:

this.SomeEvent += CreateThrottledEventHandler(
    (s,e) => Console.WriteLine("I am throttled!"),
    TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));

Although, you should store the handler returned from CreateThrottledEventHandler if you need to unwire it with -= later.

  • Can you please demonstrate how i can attach this into an existing event. – WinPhone Artist Jan 28 '14 at 11:36
  • Edited in example of attaching it. – James World Jan 28 '14 at 11:39
  • Any reason for not adding Await for Task.Delay() – WinPhone Artist Jan 29 '14 at 10:01
  • No. Just being nice to .NET 4.0 people. – James World Jan 29 '14 at 12:02
  • 1
    Although I only tested on Window 8 desktop, Task.Delay is not synchronous on any platform AFAIK - at least not on the default task scheduler; something else must be going on in your case. Clearly for the above code to work properly, the resetting of the 'throttle' flag must be done asynchronously otherwise the event delegate chain is blocked. – James World Jan 30 '14 at 7:07
15

I believe the following requirements are essential in a 'throttled' event handler:

  • The first event is raised immediately.
  • Subsequent events - which occur within the throttling period - are ignored.
  • The last event to occur during the throttling period is guaranteed to be raised, once the throttling period has expired.

Considering those requirements, the previously-accepted answer was not satisfactory; it correctly fulfills the first two requirements, but it does not guarantee that the last event will eventually be raised. I think that point is particularly important, because events which are raised with high frequency typically represent 'change of state' and/or 'user requests'; and we always want to receive the last update for changes in state or user interaction.

In an effort to satisfy all these requirements, I created my own generic "ThrottledEventHandler" class.

public class ThrottledEventHandler<TArgs>
    where TArgs : EventArgs
{
    private readonly EventHandler<TArgs> _innerHandler;
    private readonly EventHandler<TArgs> _outerHandler;
    private readonly Timer _throttleTimer;

    private readonly object _throttleLock = new object();
    private Action _delayedHandler = null;

    public ThrottledEventHandler(EventHandler<TArgs> handler, TimeSpan delay)
    {
        _innerHandler = handler;
        _outerHandler = HandleIncomingEvent;
        _throttleTimer = new Timer(delay.TotalMilliseconds);
        _throttleTimer.Elapsed += Timer_Tick;
    }

    private void HandleIncomingEvent(object sender, TArgs args)
    {
        lock (_throttleLock)
        {
            if (_throttleTimer.Enabled)
            {
                _delayedHandler = () => SendEventToHandler(sender, args);
            }
            else
            {
                SendEventToHandler(sender, args);
            }
        }
    }

    private void SendEventToHandler(object sender, TArgs args)
    {
        if (_innerHandler != null)
        {
            _innerHandler(sender, args);
            _throttleTimer.Start();
        }
    }

    private void Timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs args)
    {
        lock (_throttleLock)
        {
            _throttleTimer.Stop();
            if (_delayedHandler != null)
            {
                _delayedHandler();
                _delayedHandler = null;
            }
        }
    }

    public static implicit operator EventHandler<TArgs>(ThrottledEventHandler<TArgs> throttledHandler)
    {
        return throttledHandler._outerHandler;
    }
}

Usage looks something like this:

myObject.MyFrequentlyRaisedEvent += new ThrottledEventHandler(MyActualEventHandler, TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(50));
  • Seems overengineered to me, in my attempts one tick handler seemed sufficient. Guess it has to do with the throttledEventHandler; personal favor probably to use a helperclass not add a handler. – EricG Apr 5 '17 at 10:11

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