13

I learnt that comparing a double using == is not a wise practice. However I was wondering if checking if a double has been initialized could be dangerous or not. For example, knowing that a variable doubleVar cannot be zero if it has been initialized, is it safe to do this?

Foo::Foo(){
    doubleVar = 0.0;  // of type double
}

void Foo::Bar(){
    if(doubleVar == 0){ // has been initialized?
        //...
    }else{
        //...
    }
}
  • 4
    That a) isn't initializing it to 0, it's assigning 0 to it, and b) comparing it with an int 0, not a double 0.0 like it was assigned. – chris Jan 28 '14 at 20:25
  • Yes. For this case it is safe. – haccks Jan 28 '14 at 20:25
  • 3
    @crush 'Who told you it isn't a wise practice to compare a double with ==' IMHO it's common agreement! – πάντα ῥεῖ Jan 28 '14 at 20:29
  • 2
    @chris being that the constructor, that assignment is the initialization of the variable. And 0 == 0.0 is true, so, for the transitive property of equality relation, it's indifferent to write 0 or 0.0 in this case. – HAL9000 Jan 28 '14 at 20:53
  • 1
    @HAL9000, It would only be initialized if it was in the constructor initializer list, unless you were using C++11 in-class member initialization. It isn't like Java. – chris Jan 28 '14 at 21:02
13

In IEEE-754, long story short:

double d;

d = 0.0;
d == 0.0   // guaranteed to evaluate to true, 0.0 can be represented exactly in double

but

double d;

d = 0.1;
d == 0.1   // not guaranteed to evaluate to true
  • 5
    Why is the latter not guaranteed to be true? It is the same value (which should go through the same promotions, as required). – user2864740 Jan 28 '14 at 20:30
  • 4
    @HAL9000 I am arguing that doesn't matter because the same value is used in both places and thus has the same bit pattern internally. This is opposed to something like 0.3 + 0.2 == 0.5 which involves math. – user2864740 Jan 28 '14 at 20:34
  • 2
    @HAL9000: If you set a double to 0.75 and it doesn’t have exactly that value, something is very, very wrong. 0.75 is exactly representable in every floating-point arithmetic system used in production. Perhaps you mean a value that isn’t typically exactly representable like 0.6? – Stephen Canon Jan 28 '14 at 20:42
  • 3
    @ouah: Strictly speaking, in C both cases should evaluate to true (6.4.4.2 p4 "An unsuffixed floating constant has type double.” and p7 "The translation-time conversion of floating constants should match the execution-time conversion of character strings by library functions, such as strtod, given matching inputs suitable for both conversions, the same result format, and default execution-time rounding.”) However, skanky compilers definitely exist that are a bit fast-and-loose with these issues. – Stephen Canon Jan 28 '14 at 20:46
  • 5
    Nobody is doing the real world program!! My GCC compiler gives FALSE as the return of the following code: double x = 0.1; return x == 0.1;. This is right, because the constant FLT_EVAL_METHOD is 2 in my case, meaning that every constant and intermediate computation is done in long double precision. The exceptions are casts and assignments. So, the double variable x, which was initialized to 0.1, has the double precision value 0.1, but the constant itself 0.1 always is a long double, so the comparisson has to be FALSE, which indeed happens. – pablo1977 Jan 28 '14 at 22:38

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