14

I need to check if a path contains the '*' character as last digit.

My approach:

length=${#filename}
((filename--))
#use substring to get the last character
if [ ${img:$length:1} == "*"] ;then
   echo "yes"
fi

This returns the [: too many arguments error.

What am I doing wrong?

17
[ "${filename:$length:1}" == "*" ] && echo yes

In your post, there was no space between "*" and ]. This confuses bash. If a statement begins with [, bash insists that its last argument be ]. Without the space, the last argument is "*"] which, after quote removal, becomes *] which is not ].

Putting it all together:

length=${#filename}
((length--))
[ "${filename:$length:1}" == "*" ] && echo yes

MORE: As per the comments below, the three lines above can be simplified to:

[ "${filename: -1}" == "*" ] && echo yes

The -1 is shorthand for getting the last character. Another possibility is:

[[ $filename = *\* ]] && echo yes

This uses bash's more powerful conditional test [[. The above sees if $filename is matches the glob pattern *\* where the first star means "zero or more of any character" and the last two characters, \*, mean a literal star character. Thus, the above tests for whether filename ends with a literal *. Another solution to this problem using [[ can be found in @broslow's answer.

3
  • 1
    Thanks, worked for me! The error was caused by the missing quotes, and the square bracket mistake you explained! – JonaSc Jan 30 '14 at 1:15
  • 1
    +1; two more things worth mentioning: (a) using [[...]] over [...] is generally preferred in bash (fewer surprises, more features) and (b) it's easier to get the last character with ${filename: -1} (or, even easier, as @chepner suggests, use $filename == *\*). – mklement0 Jan 30 '14 at 4:12
  • Totally agree mklement0's advice. – BMW Jan 30 '14 at 4:26
9

Just use regex

if [[ "$filename" =~ '*'$ ]]; then 
  echo "yes"
fi

Couple of issues in your syntax.

  • You need a space before the last ]
  • Make sure to quote variables inside single brackets
  • ${variable:${#variable}:1} won't return any characters, ${variable:$((${#variable}-1))} should work (note though the 1 length at the end is redundant)
2
  • 2
    You can also use pattern matching: [[ $filename = *\* ]]. Which you choose is a matter of personal preference. – chepner Jan 29 '14 at 15:01
  • Why use double quotes inside double [[ ]]? By the way, why use "if; then fi" sintax while using double [[ ]] ? – Roger Feb 8 '20 at 9:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.