51

I am writing the following methods to add and remove users from active directory in C#.

void AddUserToGroup(string userId, string groupName);
void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userId, string groupName);

How best to implement these methods?

Here is some code from CodeProject. I can't see where the AD server is specified in these examples though? (is it implicitly supplied by the .NET framework when using the LDAP protocol?). Are these examples worth following?

public void AddToGroup(string userDn, string groupDn)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryEntry dirEntry = new DirectoryEntry("LDAP://" + groupDn);
        dirEntry.Properties["member"].Add(userDn);
        dirEntry.CommitChanges();
        dirEntry.Close();
    }
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E)
    {
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString();

    }
}


public void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userDn, string groupDn)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryEntry dirEntry = new DirectoryEntry("LDAP://" + groupDn);
        dirEntry.Properties["member"].Remove(userDn);
        dirEntry.CommitChanges();
        dirEntry.Close();
    }
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E)
    {
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString();

    }
}

4 Answers 4

101

Ugh. LDAP. If you're using the .Net Framework 3.5 or above, I highly recommend using the System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement namespace. That makes things so much easier.

public void AddUserToGroup(string userId, string groupName) 
{ 
    try 
    { 
        using (PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "COMPANY"))
        {
            GroupPrincipal group = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, groupName);
            group.Members.Add(pc, IdentityType.UserPrincipalName, userId);
            group.Save();
        }
    } 
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E) 
    { 
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString(); 

    } 
} 

public void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userId, string groupName)
{   
    try 
    { 
        using (PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "COMPANY"))
        {
            GroupPrincipal group = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, groupName);
            group.Members.Remove(pc, IdentityType.UserPrincipalName, userId);
            group.Save();
        }
    } 
    catch (System.DirectoryServices.DirectoryServicesCOMException E) 
    { 
        //doSomething with E.Message.ToString(); 

    }
}
12
  • 2
    System.DirectorServices.AccountManagement is only available in >= 3.5, rather than 3.0
    – regex
    Sep 25, 2012 at 23:48
  • 4
    Below code worked for me group.Members.Remove(UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, userId)); instead of "group.Members.Remove(pc, IdentityType.UserPrincipalName, userId);" . Note: my user id is just "USERNAME" without appending with domain name
    – Ram
    Feb 4, 2013 at 6:02
  • 7
    Had a similar issue to the described above. I had to change the line that removes the user from the group from IdentityType.UserPrincipalName to IdentityType.SAMAccountName
    – Ju66ernaut
    Jun 30, 2015 at 18:17
  • 7
    What is userId ?
    – Kiquenet
    Feb 16, 2016 at 8:39
  • 6
    I know it was said in the above comments, but it wasn't clarified. If you send in DOMAIN\someUserId as your user, that's when you have to change it to IdentityType.SamAccountName, instead of UserPrincipalName. The latter will give you an exception: No principal matching the specified parameters was found. But note, too, it will also give you an exception with SamAccountName, if the user is already in the group.
    – vapcguy
    Oct 24, 2016 at 14:53
4

The server is part of the groupDn variable value. For example:

LDAP://myServer/CN=MyGroup,CN=Groups,CN=MyContainer,DN=mydomain.com

The whole thing is the LDAP path for the group. The first part (myServer) is the server name.

The part after the server name (e.g. CN=...) is the DN (distinguished name) of the group.

2
  • The only thing I would say is that in a good AD setup, you should not have to specify the server. The .NET AD/low level AD calls should resolve the nearest available server for you. But this is more AD/domain setup and not so much code. If your AD setup is solid, you should be able to exclude the server (e.g. LDAP://CN=MyGroup,CN=Groups,CN=MyContainer,DN=mydomain.com) Jan 26, 2010 at 22:22
  • 1
    Sorry didn't really answer your questions. yes, the examples do seem clean. If you are still unsure, I highly recommend the .NET Developer's Guide to Directory Services Programming (amazon.com/gp/product/0321350170) Jan 26, 2010 at 22:29
3

When deleting a member in public void RemoveUserFromGroup(string userDn, string groupDn)

dirEntry.Properties["member"].Remove(userDn) does not work for me.

dirEntry.Properties["member"].RemoveAt(dn.IndexOf(dn)) works.

2
  • What is the dn variable?
    – fripp13
    Mar 28, 2017 at 11:39
  • @fripp13, in the context of an Active Directory, dn almost always means DistinguishedName. Feb 26, 2018 at 14:00
1

You can put the LDAP server in the path argument to DirectoryEntry, so "LDAP://" + ldapServer + ldapQuery.

Use the DirectoryEntry(String path, String userId, String password) if you need to authenticate

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