I'm wondering if someone can explain to me what exactly the compiler might be doing for me to observe such extreme differences in performance for a simple method.

 public static uint CalculateCheckSum(string str) { 
    char[] charArray = str.ToCharArray();
    uint checkSum = 0;
    foreach (char c in charArray) {
        checkSum += c;
    }
    return checkSum % 256;
 }

I'm working with a colleague doing some benchmarking/optimizations for a message processing application. Doing 10 million iterations of this function using the same input string took about 25 seconds in Visual Studio 2012, however when the project was built using the "Optimize Code" option turned on the same code executed in 7 seconds for the same 10 million iterations.

I'm very interested to understand what the compiler is doing behind the scenes for us to be able to see a greater than 3x performance increase for a seemingly innocent block of code such as this.

As requested, here is a complete Console application that demonstrates what I am seeing.

class Program
{
    public static uint CalculateCheckSum(string str)
    {
        char[] charArray = str.ToCharArray();
        uint checkSum = 0;
        foreach (char c in charArray)
        {
            checkSum += c;
        }
        return checkSum % 256;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string stringToCount = "8=FIX.4.29=15135=D49=SFS56=TOMW34=11752=20101201-03:03:03.2321=DEMO=DG00121=155=IBM54=138=10040=160=20101201-03:03:03.23244=10.059=0100=ARCA10=246";
        Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            CalculateCheckSum(stringToCount);
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.Elapsed);
    }
}

Running in debug with Optimization off I see 13 seconds, on I get 2 seconds.

Running in Release with Optimization off 3.1 seconds and on 2.3 seconds.

  • 5
    A few questions; are you running in Release mode? Are you using the Stopwatch for timing? – Mike Perrenoud Jan 29 '14 at 17:52
  • 1
    Hazarding a guess it's probably turning the foreach loop into a for loop which would prevent it from having to switch from arrays to enumerations. See stackoverflow.com/questions/365615/… for some discussion on this. – doctorless Jan 29 '14 at 17:52
  • 3
    Going to sit back and wait for Eric Lippert to provide the definitive, speculation-free response. – Yuck Jan 29 '14 at 17:58
  • 3
    @JesseCarter: I would strongly suggest you run it standalone (e.g. as a console app) rather than from a unit test runner. Remove as many extraneous bits as possible. – Jon Skeet Jan 29 '14 at 17:58
  • 2
    Can you post your input string as well? Or more ideally, a short but complete program which demonstrates the difference. – Jon Skeet Jan 29 '14 at 18:01
up vote 6 down vote accepted

To look at what the C# compiler does for you, you need to look at the IL. If you want to see how that affects the JITted code, you'll need to look at the native code as described by Scott Chamberlain. Be aware that the JITted code will vary based on processor architecture, CLR version, how the process was launched, and possibly other things.

I would usually start with the IL, and then potentially look at the JITted code.

Comparing the IL using ildasm can be slightly tricky, as it includes a label for each instruction. Here are two versions of your method compiled with and without optimization (using the C# 5 compiler), with extraneous labels (and nop instructions) removed to make them as easy to compare as possible:

Optimized

  .method public hidebysig static uint32 
          CalculateCheckSum(string str) cil managed
  {
    // Code size       46 (0x2e)
    .maxstack  2
    .locals init (char[] V_0,
             uint32 V_1,
             char V_2,
             char[] V_3,
             int32 V_4)
    ldarg.0
    callvirt   instance char[] [mscorlib]System.String::ToCharArray()
    stloc.0
    ldc.i4.0
    stloc.1
    ldloc.0
    stloc.3
    ldc.i4.0
    stloc.s    V_4
    br.s       loopcheck
  loopstart:
    ldloc.3
    ldloc.s    V_4
    ldelem.u2
    stloc.2
    ldloc.1
    ldloc.2
    add
    stloc.1
    ldloc.s    V_4
    ldc.i4.1
    add
    stloc.s    V_4
  loopcheck:
    ldloc.s    V_4
    ldloc.3
    ldlen
    conv.i4
    blt.s      loopstart
    ldloc.1
    ldc.i4     0x100
    rem.un
    ret
  } // end of method Program::CalculateCheckSum

Unoptimized

  .method public hidebysig static uint32 
          CalculateCheckSum(string str) cil managed
  {
    // Code size       63 (0x3f)
    .maxstack  2
    .locals init (char[] V_0,
             uint32 V_1,
             char V_2,
             uint32 V_3,
             char[] V_4,
             int32 V_5,
             bool V_6)
    ldarg.0
    callvirt   instance char[] [mscorlib]System.String::ToCharArray()
    stloc.0
    ldc.i4.0
    stloc.1
    ldloc.0
    stloc.s    V_4
    ldc.i4.0
    stloc.s    V_5
    br.s       loopcheck

  loopstart:
    ldloc.s    V_4
    ldloc.s    V_5
    ldelem.u2
    stloc.2
    ldloc.1
    ldloc.2
    add
    stloc.1
    ldloc.s    V_5
    ldc.i4.1
    add
    stloc.s    V_5
  loopcheck:
    ldloc.s    V_5
    ldloc.s    V_4
    ldlen
    conv.i4
    clt
    stloc.s    V_6
    ldloc.s    V_6
    brtrue.s   loopstart

    ldloc.1
    ldc.i4     0x100
    rem.un
    stloc.3
    br.s       methodend

  methodend:
    ldloc.3
    ret
  }

Points to note:

  • The optimized version uses fewer locals. This may allow the JIT to use registers more effectively.
  • The optimized version uses blt.s rather than clt followed by brtrue.s when checking whether or not to go round the loop again (this is the reason for one of the extra locals).
  • The unoptimized version uses an additional local to store the return value before returning, presumably to make debugging easier.
  • The unoptimized version has an unconditional branch just before it returns.
  • The optimized version is shorter, but I doubt that it's short enough to be inlined, so I suspect that's irrelevant.

To get a good understanding, you should look at the IL code generated.

Compile the assembly, then make a copy of it and compile again with the optimizations. Then open both assemblies in .net reflector and compare the difference of the compiled IL.

Update: Dotnet Reflector is available at http://www.red-gate.com/products/dotnet-development/reflector/

Update 2: IlSpy seems like a good open source alternative. http://ilspy.net/

Open Source Alternatives to Reflector?

  • 1
    Looking at the IL is not enough, you need to see the JITed output to see the bulk of the optimizations applied. – Scott Chamberlain Jan 29 '14 at 18:04
  • 2
    @ScottChamberlain: Not by the compiler optimization flag. The output of the compiler is the IL. Any change due to the compiler flag must be present in the IL. How the JIT optimizes things is a different matter. – Jon Skeet Jan 29 '14 at 18:08
  • 3
    Note that you don't need Reflector (a paid product beyond the free trial) - ildasm will do the job just fine. – Jon Skeet Jan 29 '14 at 18:09
  • 3
    ILSpy is a free alternative to Reflector that also decompiles to C# or IL. – Scott Chamberlain Jan 29 '14 at 18:13

I don't know what optimizations it is doing but I can show you how you can find out for your self.

First build your code optimized and start it without the debugger attached (the JIT compiler will generate different code if the debugger is attached). Run your code so that you know that section was entered at least once so the JIT Compiler had a chance to process it and in Visual Studio go to Debug->Attach To Process.... From the new menu choose your running application.

Put a breakpoint in the spot you are wondering about and let the program stop, once stopped go to Debug->Windows->Dissasembly. That will show you the compiled code the JIT created and you will be able to inspect what it is doing.

(Click for larger view) enter image description here

  • 2
    Looking at the JITted code doesn't show the difference in the compiler output. The answer which you commented on but was deleted was right in this case, IMO. The flag is to the compiler, and the output of the compiler is the IL. – Jon Skeet Jan 29 '14 at 18:07
  • @JonSkeet however, and please correct me if I am wrong, the optimized IL will be more likely to be further optimized by the JIT due do it being more "JIT friendly" resulting in much larger changes between the IL code and the JIT code. – Scott Chamberlain Jan 29 '14 at 18:11
  • Yes, it will be further optimized by the JIT. But the OP says they're interested in what the compiler is doing - so it makes sense to look at the compiler output, not the JIT output. (The JIT will depend on all kinds of things.) – Jon Skeet Jan 29 '14 at 18:13
  • @JonSkeet: The OP did ask about the compiler, but it sounds (to me) like he is assuming that is where all of the optimization is occurring. If the compiler is outputting IL which is more easily optimized by the JIT then the compiler differences are only half of the equation. – Ed S. Jan 29 '14 at 18:14
  • In my interpretation of the question the OP is more interested in what in total decreased his run time from 25 seconds to 7 seconds which would involve looking at both the performance gains of the IL optimizations and the optimizations of the JITed code. EDIT: What @EdS. said :) – Scott Chamberlain Jan 29 '14 at 18:15

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