4

I am attempting to speed up a query that takes around 60 seconds to complete on a table of ~20 million rows.

For this example, the table has three columns (id, dateAdded, name). id is the primary key. The indexes I have added to the table are:

(dateAdded)
(name)
(id, name)
(id, name, dateAdded)

The query I am trying to run is:

SELECT MAX(id) as id, name 
FROM exampletable 
WHERE dateAdded <= '2014-01-20 12:00:00' 
GROUP BY name 
ORDER BY NULL;

The date is variable from query to query.

The objective of this is to get the most recent entry for each name at or before the date added.

When I use explain on the query it tells me that it is using the (id, name, dateAdded) index.

+----+-------------+------------------+-------+------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+------+----------+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table            | type  | possible_keys    | key                                          | key_len | ref  | rows     | Extra                                                     |
+----+-------------+------------------+-------+------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+------+----------+-----------------------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | exampletable     | index | date_added_index | id_element_name_date_added_index             | 162     | NULL | 22016957 | Using where; Using index; Using temporary; Using filesort |
+----+-------------+------------------+-------+------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+------+----------+-----------------------------------------------------------+

Edit: Added two new indexes from comments:

(dateAdded, name, id)
(name, id)

+----+-------------+------------------+-------+---------------------------------------------------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+------+----------+-------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table            | type  | possible_keys                                                 | key                                          | key_len | ref  | rows     | Extra                                     |
+----+-------------+------------------+-------+---------------------------------------------------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+------+----------+-------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | exampletable     | index | date_added_index,date_added_name_id_index                     | id__name_date_added_index                    | 162     | NULL | 22040469 | Using where; Using index; Using temporary |
+----+-------------+------------------+-------+---------------------------------------------------------------+----------------------------------------------+---------+------+----------+-------------------------------------------+

Edit: Added create table script.

CREATE TABLE `exampletable` (
  `id` int(10) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `dateAdded` timestamp NULL default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `name` varchar(50) character set utf8 default '',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  KEY `date_added_index` (`dateAdded`),
  KEY `name_index` USING BTREE (`name`),
  KEY `id_name_index` USING BTREE (`id`,`name`),
  KEY `id_name_date_added_index` USING BTREE (`id`,`dateAdded`,`name`),
  KEY `date_added_name_id_index` USING BTREE (`dateAdded`,`name`,`id`),
  KEY `name_id_index` USING BTREE (`name`,`id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=22046064 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

Edit: Here is the Explain from the answer provided by HeavyE.

+----+-------------+--------------+-------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------+---------+--------------------------------------------------+------+---------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table        | type  | possible_k                                                                               | key                      | key_len | ref                                              | rows | Extra                                 |
+----+-------------+--------------+-------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------+---------+--------------------------------------------------+------+---------------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | <derived2>   | ALL   | NULL                                                                                     | NULL                     | NULL    | NULL                                             | 1732 | Using temporary; Using filesort       |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | example1     | ref   | date_added_index,name_index,date_added_name_id_index,name_id_index,name_date_added_index | date_added_name_id_index | 158     | maxDateByElement.dateAdded,maxDateByElement.name |    1 | Using where; Using index              |
|  2 | DERIVED     | exampletable | range | date_added_index,date_added_name_id_index                                                | name_date_added_index    | 158     | NULL                                             | 1743 | Using where; Using index for group-by |
+----+-------------+--------------+-------+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+--------------------------+---------+--------------------------------------------------+------+---------------------------------------+
21
  • 2
    My guess, its the order by null. Jan 29, 2014 at 18:22
  • I added the ORDER BY NULL because GROUPBY orders by default. By adding ORDER BY NULL, it removes the sort. See stackoverflow.com/questions/5231907/order-by-null-in-mysql. The problem also exists without the ORDER BY NULL. Jan 29, 2014 at 18:24
  • If the "explain" looks good then maybe it's the hardware or the environment that's the issue? Curious, how many rows have dateAdded <= your date?
    – Rick S
    Jan 29, 2014 at 18:36
  • 1
    I'm with @RickS on this: if the EXPLAIN looks right, it's hardware, settings, something outside the query. Can you post the EXPLAIN jic?
    – bishop
    Jan 29, 2014 at 20:29
  • 2
    Sounds like (dateAdded, name, id) would be better than (id, dateAdded, name) because that would keep it "index-only", but would also have everything in exactly the right order that's needed by this query.
    – Darius X.
    Jan 29, 2014 at 20:32

3 Answers 3

7

There is a great Stack Overflow post on optimization of Selecting rows with the max value in a column: https://stackoverflow.com/a/7745635/633063

This seems a little messy but works very well:

SELECT example1.name, MAX(example1.id)
FROM exampletable example1
INNER JOIN (
select name, max(dateAdded) dateAdded
from exampletable
where dateAdded  <= '2014-01-20 12:00:00' 
group by name
) maxDateByElement on example1.name = maxDateByElement.name AND example1.dateAdded = maxDateByElement.dateAdded
GROUP BY name;
5
  • From what I can tell, this is returning exactly the data I'm looking for, and it takes less than 1 second. Feb 3, 2014 at 19:43
  • @FuryComputers can u give it's explain result?
    – thekosmix
    Feb 4, 2014 at 8:20
  • @thekosmix Added the explain to the question. Hope that helps you! Feb 4, 2014 at 18:26
  • But it is not necessarily correct! If the ids were not assigned in chronological order, this could deliver the wrong ids. (There are many processing situations that could cause them to be out of order.) On the other hand, This query may be more correct than the OP's. It gets the "latest" (based on dateAdded), disambiguation based on id.
    – Rick James
    Nov 16, 2021 at 17:21
  • In other words, "getting the "last id assigned" is not necessarily the same as "getting the last row added".
    – Rick James
    Nov 16, 2021 at 17:23
2

why are you using index on many keys?? if your where clause contains only one column, then use that index only, put index on dateAdded and on name separately and then use in sql statement like this:

SELECT MAX(id) as id, name 
FROM exampletable 
USE INDEX (dateAdded_index) USE INDEX FOR GROUP BY (name_index) 
WHERE dateAdded <= '2014-01-20 12:00:00' 
GROUP BY name
ORDER BY NULL;

here is the link if you want to know more. Please let me know, whether it is giving some positive results or not.

3
0

IF the where command makes no difference, then its either the max(id) or the name. I would test the indexes by eliminating Max(id) completely, and see if the group by name is fast. Then I would add Min(id) to see if its any faster than Max(id). (I have seen this make a difference).

Also, you should test the order by NULL. Try Order by name desc, or Order by name asc. Clark Vera

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