Which files should I include in .gitignore when using Git in conjunction with Visual Studio Solutions (.sln) and Projects?

  • 3
    Related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/72298/… – Greg Hewgill Jan 27 '10 at 1:35
  • 1
    I made this into a community wiki, and have consolidated all existing answers into the post. Please contribute as you see fit! – Martin Suchanek Jan 29 '10 at 1:00
  • 11
    I would be careful ignoring .exe and .pdb's, you may inadvertently ignore tooling that you store with your source (nant, nunit gui, etc...). – James Gregory May 21 '10 at 13:32
  • 2
    @murki - looks like this is the answer: coderjournal.com/2011/12/… – Ronnie Overby Jan 25 '12 at 19:19
  • 5
    With .sln files checked in, we get noise diffs such as -# Visual Studio 14 -VisualStudioVersion = 14.0.24720.0 +# Visual Studio 2013 +VisualStudioVersion = 12.0.31101.0 Can this be avoided? – Jean Jordaan Feb 26 '16 at 7:52

18 Answers 18

See the official GitHub's "Collection of useful .gitignore templates".

The .gitignore for Visual Studio can be found here:
https://github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/VisualStudio.gitignore

  • 6
    Please note. This file contains an entry to ignore published files. However the way the rule is written, it will ignore Any folder you have called "Publish", and will there fore ignore anything you have under neath it. It does not specifically target the Visual Studio "Publishing" output. It will ignore it, but also other things. – Rex Whitten Oct 20 '14 at 14:43
  • 4
    @starfighterxyz if you think there is a bug in the gitignore, I would recommend creating a pull request. – Chronial Oct 20 '14 at 18:12
  • 8
    Well, I dont know (enough?) to say its a bug. I just happend to be using Publish/ as a Controller name, and as Project Folder names. I think this is just an edge case. Just something to save a few hours of your life :) – Rex Whitten Oct 30 '14 at 19:39
  • 2
    @Learner because these are in different files. You should add these to your personal global gitignore, instead of checking them in. github.com/github/gitignore/tree/master/Global – Chronial Sep 6 '16 at 3:29
  • 1
    @ErikAronesty you can create an issue or a PR on the github repo. But *.user is already ignored, which includes .vcxproj.user. – Chronial Nov 16 at 15:22

There's an online tool which allow you to generate .gitignore file based on your OS, IDE, language, etc. Take a look at http://www.gitignore.io/.

enter image description here

On 8/20/2014, here's the file that is generated for Visual Studio + Windows.

# Created by http://www.gitignore.io

### VisualStudio ###
## Ignore Visual Studio temporary files, build results, and
## files generated by popular Visual Studio add-ons.

# User-specific files
*.suo
*.user
*.sln.docstates

# Build results
[Dd]ebug/
[Dd]ebugPublic/
[Rr]elease/
[Rr]eleases/
x64/
x86/
build/
bld/
[Bb]in/
[Oo]bj/

# Roslyn cache directories
*.ide/

# MSTest test Results
[Tt]est[Rr]esult*/
[Bb]uild[Ll]og.*

#NUNIT
*.VisualState.xml
TestResult.xml

# Build Results of an ATL Project
[Dd]ebugPS/
[Rr]eleasePS/
dlldata.c

*_i.c
*_p.c
*_i.h
*.ilk
*.meta
*.obj
*.pch
*.pdb
*.pgc
*.pgd
*.rsp
*.sbr
*.tlb
*.tli
*.tlh
*.tmp
*.tmp_proj
*.log
*.vspscc
*.vssscc
.builds
*.pidb
*.svclog
*.scc

# Chutzpah Test files
_Chutzpah*

# Visual C++ cache files
ipch/
*.aps
*.ncb
*.opensdf
*.sdf
*.cachefile

# Visual Studio profiler
*.psess
*.vsp
*.vspx

# TFS 2012 Local Workspace
$tf/

# Guidance Automation Toolkit
*.gpState

# ReSharper is a .NET coding add-in
_ReSharper*/
*.[Rr]e[Ss]harper
*.DotSettings.user

# JustCode is a .NET coding addin-in
.JustCode

# TeamCity is a build add-in
_TeamCity*

# DotCover is a Code Coverage Tool
*.dotCover

# NCrunch
_NCrunch_*
.*crunch*.local.xml

# MightyMoose
*.mm.*
AutoTest.Net/

# Web workbench (sass)
.sass-cache/

# Installshield output folder
[Ee]xpress/

# DocProject is a documentation generator add-in
DocProject/buildhelp/
DocProject/Help/*.HxT
DocProject/Help/*.HxC
DocProject/Help/*.hhc
DocProject/Help/*.hhk
DocProject/Help/*.hhp
DocProject/Help/Html2
DocProject/Help/html

# Click-Once directory
publish/

# Publish Web Output
*.[Pp]ublish.xml
*.azurePubxml
# TODO: Comment the next line if you want to checkin your web deploy settings 
# but database connection strings (with potential passwords) will be unencrypted
*.pubxml
*.publishproj

# NuGet Packages
*.nupkg
# The packages folder can be ignored because of Package Restore
**/packages/*
# except build/, which is used as an MSBuild target.
!**/packages/build/
# If using the old MSBuild-Integrated Package Restore, uncomment this:
#!**/packages/repositories.config

# Windows Azure Build Output
csx/
*.build.csdef

# Windows Store app package directory
AppPackages/

# Others
sql/
*.Cache
ClientBin/
[Ss]tyle[Cc]op.*
~$*
*~
*.dbmdl
*.dbproj.schemaview
*.pfx
*.publishsettings
node_modules/

# RIA/Silverlight projects
Generated_Code/

# Backup & report files from converting an old project file
# to a newer Visual Studio version. Backup files are not needed,
# because we have git ;-)
_UpgradeReport_Files/
Backup*/
UpgradeLog*.XML
UpgradeLog*.htm

# SQL Server files
*.mdf
*.ldf

# Business Intelligence projects
*.rdl.data
*.bim.layout
*.bim_*.settings

# Microsoft Fakes
FakesAssemblies/


### Windows ###
# Windows image file caches
Thumbs.db
ehthumbs.db

# Folder config file
Desktop.ini

# Recycle Bin used on file shares
$RECYCLE.BIN/

# Windows Installer files
*.cab
*.msi
*.msm
*.msp

I use the following .gitignore for C# projects. Additional patterns are added as and when they are needed.

[Oo]bj
[Bb]in
*.user
*.suo
*.[Cc]ache
*.bak
*.ncb
*.log 
*.DS_Store
[Tt]humbs.db 
_ReSharper.*
*.resharper
Ankh.NoLoad
  • 2
    Disagree with *.resharper. Files matching *.ReSharper.user should be ignored, but that's catered for by the *.user rule above. – Drew Noakes Jul 9 '12 at 19:25
  • 1
    @DrewNoakes: What are the ReSharper files that you believe should be revision controlled? – Per Lundberg Oct 11 '13 at 19:48
  • 4
    @PerLundberg One reason worth considering is you can configure standard project formatting options, etc, and save the config files with the project. If this is in git, it makes it easier for everyone using Resharper to keep the project formatted consistently. – Marc Jun 29 '15 at 4:41
  • @DrewNoakes - Any suggestions for this please? – student Dec 11 '15 at 8:56

For those interested in what Microsoft thinks should be included in the gitignore, here's the default one which Visual Studio 2013 RTM automatically generates when creating a new Git-Repository:

## Ignore Visual Studio temporary files, build results, and
## files generated by popular Visual Studio add-ons.

# User-specific files
*.suo
*.user
*.sln.docstates

# Build results

[Dd]ebug/
[Rr]elease/
x64/
build/
[Bb]in/
[Oo]bj/

# Enable "build/" folder in the NuGet Packages folder since NuGet packages use it for MSBuild targets
!packages/*/build/

# MSTest test Results
[Tt]est[Rr]esult*/
[Bb]uild[Ll]og.*

*_i.c
*_p.c
*.ilk
*.meta
*.obj
*.pch
*.pdb
*.pgc
*.pgd
*.rsp
*.sbr
*.tlb
*.tli
*.tlh
*.tmp
*.tmp_proj
*.log
*.vspscc
*.vssscc
.builds
*.pidb
*.log
*.scc

# Visual C++ cache files
ipch/
*.aps
*.ncb
*.opensdf
*.sdf
*.cachefile

# Visual Studio profiler
*.psess
*.vsp
*.vspx

# Guidance Automation Toolkit
*.gpState

# ReSharper is a .NET coding add-in
_ReSharper*/
*.[Rr]e[Ss]harper

# TeamCity is a build add-in
_TeamCity*

# DotCover is a Code Coverage Tool
*.dotCover

# NCrunch
*.ncrunch*
.*crunch*.local.xml

# Installshield output folder
[Ee]xpress/

# DocProject is a documentation generator add-in
DocProject/buildhelp/
DocProject/Help/*.HxT
DocProject/Help/*.HxC
DocProject/Help/*.hhc
DocProject/Help/*.hhk
DocProject/Help/*.hhp
DocProject/Help/Html2
DocProject/Help/html

# Click-Once directory
publish/

# Publish Web Output
*.Publish.xml

# NuGet Packages Directory
## TODO: If you have NuGet Package Restore enabled, uncomment the next line
#packages/

# Windows Azure Build Output
csx
*.build.csdef

# Windows Store app package directory
AppPackages/

# Others
sql/
*.Cache
ClientBin/
[Ss]tyle[Cc]op.*
~$*
*~
*.dbmdl
*.[Pp]ublish.xml
*.pfx
*.publishsettings

# RIA/Silverlight projects
Generated_Code/

# Backup & report files from converting an old project file to a newer
# Visual Studio version. Backup files are not needed, because we have git ;-)
_UpgradeReport_Files/
Backup*/
UpgradeLog*.XML
UpgradeLog*.htm

# SQL Server files
App_Data/*.mdf
App_Data/*.ldf


#LightSwitch generated files
GeneratedArtifacts/
_Pvt_Extensions/
ModelManifest.xml

# =========================
# Windows detritus
# =========================

# Windows image file caches
Thumbs.db
ehthumbs.db

# Folder config file
Desktop.ini

# Recycle Bin used on file shares
$RECYCLE.BIN/

# Mac desktop service store files
.DS_Store

See: Add a default .gitignore file on MSDN

While you should keep your NuGet packages.config file, you should exclude the packages folder:

#NuGet
packages/

I typically don't store binaries, or anything generated from my source, in source control. There are differing opinions on this however. If it makes things easier for your build system, do it! I would however, argue that you are not versioning these dependencies, so they will just take up space in your repository. Storing the binaries in a central location, then relying on the packages.config file to indicate which version is needed is a better solution, in my opinion.

  • 4
    anyone care to elaborate on why you'd want to exclude the packages folder? doesn't it make sense to include the packages for the build server to have the dependencies? – Joel Martinez Jan 3 '12 at 2:51
  • 14
    It's worth noting that the NuGet team implemented the 'package restore' feature for exactly this problem. There's a document on the NuGet site which explains the feature and describes how to use it in Visual Studio. – ajk Mar 6 '12 at 19:54
  • 4
    If you ignore packages and are using nuget package restore, it's helpful to allow nuget.exe. When someone downloads, this tells helps VS tell that the feature has been enabled for the solution: !NuGet.exe <- do not ignore this file. – danludwig Jun 25 '12 at 18:45
  • For those of you using AppHarbor, it's worth noting that excluding the packages folder will cause your build to fail deployment :) – Joel Martinez Jul 1 '12 at 3:56

I prefer to exclude things on an as-needed basis. You don't want to shotgun exclude everything with the string "bin" or "obj" in the name. At least be sure to follow those with a slash.

Here's what I start with on a VS2010 project:

bin/
obj/
*.suo
*.user

And only because I use ReSharper, also this:

_ReSharper*
  • Agree. Also, this goes for "debug". Add the trailing slash to this to avoid ignoring files with debug in the name. – John Korsnes Jul 8 '14 at 13:27

On Visual Studio 2015 Update 3, and with Git extension updated as of today (2016-10-24), the .gitignore generated by Visual Studio is:

## Ignore Visual Studio temporary files, build results, and
## files generated by popular Visual Studio add-ons.

# User-specific files
*.suo
*.user
*.userosscache
*.sln.docstates

# User-specific files (MonoDevelop/Xamarin Studio)
*.userprefs

# Build results
[Dd]ebug/
[Dd]ebugPublic/
[Rr]elease/
[Rr]eleases/
[Xx]64/
[Xx]86/
[Bb]uild/
bld/
[Bb]in/
[Oo]bj/

# Visual Studio 2015 cache/options directory
.vs/
# Uncomment if you have tasks that create the project's static files in wwwroot
#wwwroot/

# MSTest test Results
[Tt]est[Rr]esult*/
[Bb]uild[Ll]og.*

# NUNIT
*.VisualState.xml
TestResult.xml

# Build Results of an ATL Project
[Dd]ebugPS/
[Rr]eleasePS/
dlldata.c

# DNX
project.lock.json
artifacts/

*_i.c
*_p.c
*_i.h
*.ilk
*.meta
*.obj
*.pch
*.pdb
*.pgc
*.pgd
*.rsp
*.sbr
*.tlb
*.tli
*.tlh
*.tmp
*.tmp_proj
*.log
*.vspscc
*.vssscc
.builds
*.pidb
*.svclog
*.scc

# Chutzpah Test files
_Chutzpah*

# Visual C++ cache files
ipch/
*.aps
*.ncb
*.opendb
*.opensdf
*.sdf
*.cachefile
*.VC.db

# Visual Studio profiler
*.psess
*.vsp
*.vspx
*.sap

# TFS 2012 Local Workspace
$tf/

# Guidance Automation Toolkit
*.gpState

# ReSharper is a .NET coding add-in
_ReSharper*/
*.[Rr]e[Ss]harper
*.DotSettings.user

# JustCode is a .NET coding add-in
.JustCode

# TeamCity is a build add-in
_TeamCity*

# DotCover is a Code Coverage Tool
*.dotCover

# NCrunch
_NCrunch_*
.*crunch*.local.xml
nCrunchTemp_*

# MightyMoose
*.mm.*
AutoTest.Net/

# Web workbench (sass)
.sass-cache/

# Installshield output folder
[Ee]xpress/

# DocProject is a documentation generator add-in
DocProject/buildhelp/
DocProject/Help/*.HxT
DocProject/Help/*.HxC
DocProject/Help/*.hhc
DocProject/Help/*.hhk
DocProject/Help/*.hhp
DocProject/Help/Html2
DocProject/Help/html

# Click-Once directory
publish/

# Publish Web Output
*.[Pp]ublish.xml
*.azurePubxml

# TODO: Un-comment the next line if you do not want to checkin 
# your web deploy settings because they may include unencrypted
# passwords
#*.pubxml
*.publishproj

# NuGet Packages
*.nupkg
# The packages folder can be ignored because of Package Restore
**/packages/*
# except build/, which is used as an MSBuild target.
!**/packages/build/
# Uncomment if necessary however generally it will be regenerated when needed
#!**/packages/repositories.config
# NuGet v3's project.json files produces more ignoreable files
*.nuget.props
*.nuget.targets

# Microsoft Azure Build Output
csx/
*.build.csdef

# Microsoft Azure Emulator
ecf/
rcf/

# Microsoft Azure ApplicationInsights config file
ApplicationInsights.config

# Windows Store app package directory
AppPackages/
BundleArtifacts/

# Visual Studio cache files
# files ending in .cache can be ignored
*.[Cc]ache
# but keep track of directories ending in .cache
!*.[Cc]ache/

# Others
ClientBin/
[Ss]tyle[Cc]op.*
~$*
*~
*.dbmdl
*.dbproj.schemaview
*.pfx
*.publishsettings
node_modules/
orleans.codegen.cs

# RIA/Silverlight projects
Generated_Code/

# Backup & report files from converting an old project file
# to a newer Visual Studio version. Backup files are not needed,
# because we have git ;-)
_UpgradeReport_Files/
Backup*/
UpgradeLog*.XML
UpgradeLog*.htm

# SQL Server files
*.mdf
*.ldf

# Business Intelligence projects
*.rdl.data
*.bim.layout
*.bim_*.settings

# Microsoft Fakes
FakesAssemblies/

# GhostDoc plugin setting file
*.GhostDoc.xml

# Node.js Tools for Visual Studio
.ntvs_analysis.dat

# Visual Studio 6 build log
*.plg

# Visual Studio 6 workspace options file
*.opt

# Visual Studio LightSwitch build output
**/*.HTMLClient/GeneratedArtifacts
**/*.DesktopClient/GeneratedArtifacts
**/*.DesktopClient/ModelManifest.xml
**/*.Server/GeneratedArtifacts
**/*.Server/ModelManifest.xml
_Pvt_Extensions

# LightSwitch generated files
GeneratedArtifacts/
ModelManifest.xml

# Paket dependency manager
.paket/paket.exe

# FAKE - F# Make
.fake/
  • 1
    I loved this part: Backup & report files from converting an old project file to a newer Visual Studio version. Backup files are not needed, because we have git ;-) – Jeancarlo Fontalvo Jan 5 '17 at 21:39

Added InstallShield ignores for the build deployment. InstallShield is the new direction Microsoft is headed over Visual Studio Installer, so we've started using it on all new projects. This added line removes the SingleImage installation files. Other InstallShield types may include DVD distribution among others. You may want to add those directory names or just [Ee]xpress/ to prevent any InstallShield LE deployment files from getting into the repo.

Here is our .gitignore for VS2010 C# projects using Install Shield LE with SingleImage deployments for the installer:

#OS junk files
[Tt]humbs.db
*.DS_Store

#Visual Studio files
*.[Oo]bj
*.exe
*.pdb
*.user
*.aps
*.pch
*.vspscc
*.vssscc
*_i.c
*_p.c
*.ncb
*.suo
*.tlb
*.tlh
*.bak
*.[Cc]ache
*.ilk
*.log
*.lib
*.sbr
*.sdf
ipch/
obj/
[Bb]in
[Dd]ebug*/
[Rr]elease*/
Ankh.NoLoad

#InstallShield
[Ss]ingle[Ii]mage/
[Dd][Vv][Dd]-5/
[Ii]nterm/

#Tooling
_ReSharper*/
*.resharper
[Tt]est[Rr]esult*

#Project files
[Bb]uild/

#Subversion files
.svn

# Office Temp Files
~$*
  • 1
    I quote James Gregory's comment here: "I would be careful ignoring .exe and .pdb's, you may inadvertently ignore tooling that you store with your source (nant, nunit gui, etc...). – James Gregory May 21 '10 at 13:32" – Jim Raden Jun 6 '12 at 21:36
  • 1
    Disagree with *.resharper. Files matching *.ReSharper.user should be ignored, but that's catered for by the *.user rule above. – Drew Noakes Jul 9 '12 at 19:25
  • Just a clarification - it's actually moving BACK to InstallShield, which existed previous to VisualStudio installer, at least as far back as 1998! – Mathieson Jul 18 '15 at 17:30

Here's an extract from a .gitignore on a recent project I was working on. I've extracted the ones that I believe are related to Visual Studio, including the compilation outputs; it's a cross platform project, so there are various other ignore rules for files produced by other build systems, and I can't guarantee that I separated them out exactly.

*.dll
*.exe
*.exp
*.ilk
*.lib
*.ncb
*.log
*.pdb
*.vcproj.*.user
[Dd]ebug
[Rr]elease

Perhaps this question should be Community Wiki, so we can all edit together one master list with comments about which files should be ignored for which types of project?

  • See James Gregory's comment on another answer: "I would be careful ignoring .exe and .pdb's, you may inadvertently ignore tooling that you store with your source (nant, nunit gui, etc...). – James Gregory May 21 '10 at 13:32" – Jim Raden Jun 6 '12 at 21:38
  • 2
    @JimRaden In general, it's best to avoid checking in binary tools into Git. Best practices are to only check in your source to Git; if you need binary tools, include a script for installing them or a submodule with just those tools. – Brian Campbell Jul 5 '12 at 21:35

Credit to Jens Lehmann for this one - if you keep source directories separate to your compiler project files and build output, you could simplify your .gitignore by negating it:

path/to/build/directory/*
!*.sln
!*.vcproj

You don't say what language(s) you're using, but the above should work for C++ projects.

  • I didn't know that there was a negation flag in .gitignore. Helpful tip! – Jim Raden Jun 6 '12 at 21:38

Late to the party here, but I also find that I use the following. Some may only be useful for hiding sensitive files when pushing to a public remote.

#Ignore email files delivered to specified pickup directory
*.eml

#Allow NuGet.exe (do not ignore)
!NuGet.exe

#Ignore WebDeploy publish profiles
*.Publish.xml

#Ignore Azure build csdef & Pubxml files
ServiceDefinition.build.csdef
*.azurePubxml

#Allow ReSharper .DotSettings (for non-namespace-provider properties)
!*.csproj.DotSettings

#Ignore private folder
/Private/
  • Latest version does not need to explicitly unignore nuget.exe – tofutim Nov 20 '12 at 18:51
  • @tofutim, the latest version of what? git itself? – danludwig Nov 20 '12 at 21:55
  • 1
    the community wiki above – tofutim Nov 20 '12 at 22:12

I know this is an old thread but for the new and the old who visit this page, there is a website called gitignore.io which can generate these files. Search "visualstudio" upon landing on the website and it will generate these files for you, also you can have multiple languages/ides ignore files concatenated into the one document.

Beautiful.

In Visual Studio 2015 Team Explorer > Local Git Repositories > Project > Settings > Git > Repository Settings > Ignore & Attribute Files.You can add .gitignore file with items should be ignored in visual studio solutions by default. enter image description here

enter image description here

If you are using a dbproj in your solution you will want to add the following:

#Visual Studio DB Project
*.dbmdl
[Ss]ql/

Source: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bahill/archive/2009/07/31/come-visit-revisit-the-beer-house-continuous-integration.aspx

There is a shortcut in Visual Studio, because it supports Git out of the box in 2015 or above. For new solutions (or some which don't have .git folder) use source control features in Solution Explorer:

Right-click on your solution and select Add Solution to Source Control... item in the popup menu.

It automatically initializes .git repository, adds .gitignore with necessary things to your solution and even .gitattributes file (line endings, etc.).

The text will appeared in the VS console:

A new Git repository has been created for you in C:\<path to your solution>
Commit ______ created locally in repository.

Done!

Here is what I use in my .NET Projects for my .gitignore file.

[Oo]bj/
[Bb]in/
*.suo
*.user
/TestResults
*.vspscc
*.vssscc

This is pretty much an all MS approach, that uses the built in Visual Studio tester, and a project that may have some TFS bindings in there too.

As mentioned by another poster, Visual Studio generates this as a part of its .gitignore (at least for MVC 4):

# SQL Server files
App_Data/*.mdf
App_Data/*.ldf

Since your project may be a subfolder of your solution, and the .gitignore file is stored in the solution root, this actually won't touch the local database files (Git sees them at projectfolder/App_Data/*.mdf). To account for this, I changed those lines like so:

# SQL Server files
*App_Data/*.mdf
*App_Data/*.ldf
  • 1
    Actually, git matches patterns relative to subdirectories, too, unless you start them with "/", in which case they only match things in the same directory as the .gitignore file. – SamB Oct 5 '15 at 5:48

I understand this is an old question, still sharing an information. In Visual Studio 2017, you can just right click on the solution file and select Add solution to source control

enter image description here

This will add two files to your source folder.

  1. .gitattributes
  2. .gitignore

This is the easiest way I guess.

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