57

In our app, we have a preset list of colors that a user can be choose from and everything related to that user will have that color.

Throughout the app, we will have various modules with the color attached as a class name.

eg.

<div class="example_module green">
  ...
</div>

We are using LESS for our CSS.

In a number of places we are doing things like this:

.example_module.green { background: @green; }
.example_module.red { background: @red; }
.example_module.blue { background: @blue; }
etc

I'd like to be able to set all these color names as an array and iterate over them. If we add colors in the future, we only have to add it in one place.

Pseudo code:

@colors: ['green', 'red', 'blue'];

for each @color in @colors {
  .example_module.@color { background: @color; }
} 

Is something like this even supported in LESS?

2
  • It's possible in LESS using recursion. It's much more straightforward in SASS. Maybe you've heard of Google? ;^) Jan 29, 2014 at 19:37
  • 2
    SASS is not the way to go. I understand why it seems easier to do, but in the long run LESS or a LESS fork will when out purely on syntax adherence.
    – augurone
    Jun 11, 2014 at 0:27

4 Answers 4

88

See Loops. For example (assuming @green, @red, @blue variables are defined elsewhere):

@colors: green, red, blue;

.example_module {
    .-(@i: length(@colors)) when (@i > 0) {
        @name: extract(@colors, @i);
        &.@{name} {background: @@name}
        .-((@i - 1));
    } .-;
}

- - -

In Modern Less the same can be more straight-forward with the help of the Lists plugin:

@colors: green, red, blue;

.for-each(@name in @colors) {
    .example_module.@{name} {
        background: @@name;
    }
}

- - -

And in Legacy Less the syntactic sugar can be achieved using:

@import "for";

@colors: green, red, blue;

.example_module {
    .for(@colors); .-each(@name) {
        &.@{name} {background: @@name}
    }
}

Where the imported "for" snippet (it's just a wrapper mixin for recursive Less loops) can be found here (with examples here and here).

14
  • 2
    SyntaxError: Operation on an invalid type in common.less on line 6, column 3: 5 .example_module { 6 .for(@colors); .-each(@color) { 7 @name: e(@color); by lessc 1.7.5
    – seyed
    Oct 23, 2014 at 19:16
  • @seyed I'm afraid you need to create a new Q with complete example (this for thing is known to work fine in Less 1.5.x-2.0.x). Oct 24, 2014 at 0:50
  • @seyed I was having that problem too. Mine was caused by a problem with the rhino-less integration; conflicting versions between the js.jar and less-rhino.x.x.x.js script.
    – nvioli
    Nov 11, 2014 at 19:37
  • Hi, is it possible to use 2 for loops inside the same less file without having mixed classes generated? I mean, I have an array with colors and I generate background-colors rules and I want to generate my h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 rules using a for too, but the problem is that less is also generating mixed classes that don't have any sense, taking both arrays and applying both for loops.
    – Fab
    Jan 12, 2015 at 15:40
17

This mixin works fine for me. The second param is a code block that have access to the current iteration elem (@value) and index (@i).

  1. Define mixin:

    .for(@list, @code) {
        & {
            .loop(@i:1) when (@i =< length(@list)) {
                @value: extract(@list, @i);
    
                @code();
    
                .loop(@i + 1);
            }
    
            .loop();
        }
    }
    
  2. Use:

    @colors: #1abc9c, #2ecc71, #3498db, #9b59b6;
    
    .for(@colors, {
        .color-@{i} {
            color: @value;
        }
    });
    
  3. Result css:

    .color-1 {
      color: #1abc9c;
    }
    .color-2 {
      color: #2ecc71;
    }
    .color-3 {
      color: #3498db;
    }
    .color-4 {
      color: #9b59b6;
    }
    
2
  • Downvoting since it's not the answer to the question. You'd either need to modify your example to match the Q or find a more apropriate Q for your mixin library example (there're a lot of earlier and more general "how-to-loop" questions). Feb 22, 2016 at 9:11
  • Also note though that DR based .for-each implementations were made since the day the DR-feature was added to Less, i.e. since 2014-02-27. And answering an old question just to post a link to yet another mixin library implementing something might not always be a good idea. (For your reference: 1, 2 etc. And finally see #2270 for the summary of all possible sugar tricks by now). Feb 22, 2016 at 9:26
14

With modern LESS (>= 3.7), you can use the built-in each function:

/* (assuming @clr-green, @clr-red, @clr-blue variables are defined elsewhere) */
@colors: {
  green: @clr-green;
  red: @clr-red;
  blue: @clr-blue;
}

each(@colors, {
  .example_module.@{key} {
    background: @value;
  }
});
4
  • Your answer, adding @index resolve my issue. Thanks.
    – Kunj
    May 18, 2020 at 19:03
  • I don't see the ability to pass an object into each() in the latest documentation. Has this been deprecated? Nov 13, 2021 at 0:31
  • 1
    @DanaWoodman No. It's right there in the docs. Second example.
    – eyecatchUp
    Nov 29, 2021 at 13:10
  • facepalm yeah I see it now, not sure how I missed it. Ignore me ;) Dec 10, 2021 at 19:04
0
  1. Define mixin:
.foreach(@list, @body, @i: length(@list)) when (@i>0) 
{
    .foreach(@list, @body, @i - 1);

    @n: length(@list);
    @value: extract(@list, @i);
    @body();
    /* you can use @value, @i, @n in the body */
}
  1. Usage:
.example-module {
  .foreach (red green blue,
  {
    &.@{value} {
      color: @value;
    }
  });
}

Another example:

.nth-child (@list, @style) {
    .foreach(@list, 
    {
      @formula: e(%("%dn+%d", @n, @i));
      &:nth-child(@{formula}) {
        @style();
      }
    });
}

tr {
  .nth-child (#bbb #ccc #ddd #eee,
  {
      background: @value;
  });
}

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