5

I made some changes to the testbed page, so I could make my question clearer here.

The page has three buttons: Set; Clear; and Get.

Set has this code:

PreferredCookie = new HttpCookie("PreferredCookie");
PreferredCookie.Value = "Chocolate Chip";
DateTime exp = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1.0d);
PreferredCookie.Expires = exp;
Response.Cookies.Set(PreferredCookie);

Clear has this:

HttpCookie PreferredCookie = Request.Cookies["PreferredCookie"];
if (PreferredCookie != null)
{
    PreferredCookie.Value = "";
    PreferredCookie.Expires = DateTime.Now;
    Response.Cookies.Set(PreferredCookie);
}

Get has this, which outputs to an asp:Literal:

HttpCookie PreferredCookie = Request.Cookies["PreferredCookie"];
if (PreferredCookie != null)
{
    CookieLiteral.Text = "Value = " + PreferredCookie.Value + "<br>";
    CookieLiteral.Text += "Expires = " + PreferredCookie.Expires.ToString("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss");
}
else
{
    CookieLiteral.Text = "<h2>No Cookie?</h2>";
}

If I start the page and click on Clear, and then follow-up with the Get, I see:

No Cookie?

If I then click the Set, then Get, I see:

Value = Chocolate Chip
Expires = 01/01/0001 00:00:00

This date seems to be treated as never expiring. I get the same results if I access the page with Firefox.

  • Is that the only place in your project where you are setting that cookie? – MikeSmithDev Jan 29 '14 at 20:17
  • Yes, @MikeSmithDev. It is a test-bed project and just for trying out cookie handling. – Cyberherbalist Jan 29 '14 at 22:29
  • How are you determining that the cookie is there and that the expiration date is from year 1? – MikeSmithDev Jan 29 '14 at 22:56
  • @MikeSmithDev I modified the question to make it clearer (I hope) and show all code. – Cyberherbalist Jan 29 '14 at 23:37
14

The Short Answer - You cannot read the cookie's expiration date and time.

Slightly Longer Answer - This is not an issue of sessions in ASP.NET. It is an issue of what you can read from a cookie server-side in ASP.NET. Per the MSDN:

The browser is responsible for managing cookies, and the cookie's expiration time and date help the browser manage its store of cookies. Therefore, although you can read the name and value of a cookie, you cannot read the cookie's expiration date and time. When the browser sends cookie information to the server, the browser does not include the expiration information. (The cookie's Expires property always returns a date-time value of zero.)

You can read the Expires property of a cookie that you have set in the HttpResponse object, before the cookie has been sent to the browser. However, you cannot get the expiration back in the HttpRequest object.

So basically, the cookie expiration date is set correctly. This can be verified by inspecting the cookie in the browser. Unfortunately, reading this cookie like in your Get function will return 1/1/0001.

If you really want to get the expiration, then you'd have to store it in the cookie itself:

Set

DateTime exp = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1);
HttpCookie PreferredCookie = new HttpCookie("PreferredCookie");
PreferredCookie.Values.Add("cookieType", "Zref");
PreferredCookie.Values.Add("exp", exp.ToString());
PreferredCookie.Expires = exp;
Response.Cookies.Set(PreferredCookie);

Get

HttpCookie PreferredCookie = Request.Cookies["PreferredCookie"];
if (PreferredCookie != null)
{
    CookieLiteral.Text = "Value = " + PreferredCookie["cookieType"] + "<br>";
    CookieLiteral.Text += "Expires = " + PreferredCookie["exp"];
}
else
{
    CookieLiteral.Text = "No Cookie";
}
  • OMG, all this time (never having worked with cookies before, after all these years), I had made the assumption the expiration date was readable. What I was trying to do was verify that the information in the cookie was set properly. It's kind of embarrassing, in a way. But I thank you sincerely for fixing my misunderstanding! – Cyberherbalist Jan 30 '14 at 18:20
  • 2
    You can't trust anything about a cookie, so this makes sense on some level. At best... if a browser does send a cookie, you have to verify everything about it. As a result, it doesn't even make sense to look at an expiration date, since it's not trustworthy. At best, it's a client-side indicator of whether or not to even bother sending the cookie to the server. – Triynko Aug 3 '15 at 21:08

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