54

pandas has support for multi-level column names:

>>>  x = pd.DataFrame({'instance':['first','first','first'],'foo':['a','b','c'],'bar':rand(3)})
>>> x = x.set_index(['instance','foo']).transpose()
>>> x.columns
MultiIndex
[(u'first', u'a'), (u'first', u'b'), (u'first', u'c')]
>>> x
instance     first                    
foo              a         b         c
bar       0.102885  0.937838  0.907467

This feature is very useful since it allows multiple versions of the same dataframe to be appended 'horizontally' with the 1st level of the column names (in my example instance) distinguishing the instances.

Imagine I already have a dataframe like this:

                 a         b         c
bar       0.102885  0.937838  0.907467

Is there a nice way to add another level to the column names, similar to this for row index:

x['instance'] = 'first'
x.set_level('instance',append=True)
4
  • 3
    I don't think there is, but there definitely should be. I think there is a feature request for this on github... Jan 29, 2014 at 22:31
  • 1
    Although it raises some interesting questions, like "how do I select a particular column when there's two levels of column naming?".
    – LondonRob
    Jan 29, 2014 at 22:35
  • 2
    x['first'], x[(first', 'a') or x.xs('a', axis=1, level=1) ? :s Jan 29, 2014 at 22:39
  • 3
    this is going to be in 0.14, and will facilitate interesting mi selections: github.com/pydata/pandas/pull/6134
    – Jeff
    Jan 30, 2014 at 2:17

7 Answers 7

59

Try this:

df=pd.DataFrame({'a':[1,2,3],'b':[4,5,6]})

columns=[('c','a'),('c','b')]

df.columns=pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(columns)
1
  • 3
    Someone might like this answer by Romain here for doing something similar to this but without the tuples since all the same level being added.
    – Wayne
    Jan 31, 2018 at 20:40
23

No need to create a list of tuples

Use: pd.MultiIndex.from_product(iterables)

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

df = pd.Series(np.random.rand(3), index=["a","b","c"]).to_frame().T
df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_product([["new_label"], df.columns])

Resultant DataFrame:

  new_label                    
          a         b         c
0   0.25999  0.337535  0.333568

Pull request from Jan 25, 2014

4
  • 2
    This looks better than the answer I selected 5+ years ago! I'm assuming it's new since then but I'm going to select it as the "chosen answer". If it's crazy wrong or bad, let me know in the comments here.
    – LondonRob
    May 20, 2020 at 10:28
  • 2
    why do I get AttributeError: module 'pandas' has no attribute 'Multiindex' ..?
    – haneulkim
    Nov 16, 2020 at 7:26
  • 1
    @Ambleu I got the same error, write MultiIndex instead of Multiindex (second I is uppercase).
    – Maria
    Jan 27, 2021 at 10:12
  • How do I specify only specific columns to the 2nd level index? Like If i want to only assign columns b and c to the new_label index? Feb 20 at 22:35
21

You can use concat. Give it a dictionary of dataframes where the key is the new column level you want to add.

In [46]: d = {}

In [47]: d['first_level'] = pd.DataFrame(columns=['idx', 'a', 'b', 'c'],
                                         data=[[10, 0.89, 0.98, 0.31],
                                               [20, 0.34, 0.78, 0.34]]).set_index('idx')

In [48]: pd.concat(d, axis=1)
Out[48]:
    first_level
              a     b     c
idx
10         0.89  0.98  0.31
20         0.34  0.78  0.34

You can use the same technique to create multiple levels.

In [49]: d['second_level'] = pd.DataFrame(columns=['idx', 'a', 'b', 'c'],
                                          data=[[10, 0.29, 0.63, 0.99],
                                                [20, 0.23, 0.26, 0.98]]).set_index('idx')

In [50]: pd.concat(d, axis=1)
Out[50]:
    first_level             second_level
              a     b     c            a     b     c
idx
10         0.89  0.98  0.31         0.29  0.63  0.99
20         0.34  0.78  0.34         0.23  0.26  0.98
1
  • simple and elegant!
    – erickfis
    Sep 10, 2021 at 13:48
7

A lot of these solutions seem just a bit more complex than they need to be.

I prefer to make things look as simple and intuitive as possible when speed isn't absolutely necessary. I think this solution accomplishes that. Tested in versions of pandas as early as 0.22.0.

Simply create a DataFrame (ignore columns in the first step) and then set colums equal to your n-dim list of column names.

In [1]: import pandas as pd                                                                                                                                                                                          

In [2]: df = pd.DataFrame([[1, 1, 1, 1], [2, 2, 2, 2]])                                                                                                                                                              

In [3]: df                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Out[3]: 
   0  1  2  3
0  1  1  1  1
1  2  2  2  2

In [4]: df.columns = [['a', 'c', 'e', 'g'], ['b', 'd', 'f', 'h']]                                                                                                                                                    

In [5]: df                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Out[5]: 
   a  c  e  g
   b  d  f  h
0  1  1  1  1
1  2  2  2  2
6
x = [('G1','a'),("G1",'b'),("G2",'a'),('G2','b')]
y = [('K1','l'),("K1",'m'),("K2",'l'),('K2','m'),("K3",'l'),('K3','m')]
row_list = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(x)
col_list = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(y)

A = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(2,5,(4,6)), row_list,col_list)
A

This is the most simple and easy way to create MultiLevel columns and rows.

enter image description here

1

Here is a function that can help you create the tuple, that can be used by pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(), a bit more generically. Got the idea from @user3377361.

def create_tuple_for_for_columns(df_a, multi_level_col):
    """
    Create a columns tuple that can be pandas MultiIndex to create multi level column

    :param df_a: pandas dataframe containing the columns that must form the first level of the multi index
    :param multi_level_col: name of second level column
    :return: tuple containing (second_level_col, firs_level_cols)
    """
    temp_columns = []
    for item in df_a.columns:
        temp_columns.append((multi_level_col, item))
    return temp_columns

It can be used like this:

df = pd.DataFrame({'a':[1,2,3],'b':[4,5,6]})
columns = create_tuple_for_for_columns(df, 'c')
df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(columns)
1

Improving the pd.concat approach by Carl, how if we got only one row each iteration? This is not an optimized approach, but you can do something like this:

# initial
ds = []

# first iteration (can be inside function)
d = {}
d['first_level'] = pd.DataFrame(columns=['idx', 'a', 'b', 'c'],
                                         data=[[10, 0.89, 0.98, 0.31]]).set_index('idx')
d['second_level'] = pd.DataFrame(columns=['idx', 'a', 'b', 'c'],
                                          data=[[10, 0.29, 0.63, 0.99]]).set_index('idx')
ds.append(pd.concat(d, axis=1))

# display(ds[0])

# second iteration (can be inside function)
d = {}
d['first_level'] = pd.DataFrame(columns=['idx', 'a', 'b', 'c'],
                                         data=[[20, 0.34, 0.78, 0.34]]).set_index('idx')
d['second_level'] = pd.DataFrame(columns=['idx', 'a', 'b', 'c'],
                                          data=[[20, 0.23, 0.26, 0.98]]).set_index('idx')
ds.append(pd.concat(d, axis=1))

# display(ds[1])

# final concat
pd.concat(ds, axis=0)

Result:

first_level second_level
idx a b c a b c
10 0.89 0.98 0.31 0.29 0.63 0.99
first_level second_level
idx a b c a b c
20 0.34 0.78 0.34 0.23 0.26 0.98
first_level second_level
idx a b c a b c
10 0.89 0.98 0.31 0.29 0.63 0.99
20 0.34 0.78 0.34 0.23 0.26 0.98

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