27

whether i do:

(function () {
'use strict';

// Create the module and define its dependencies.
var app = angular.module('app', [
    // Angular modules 
    'ngAnimate',        // animations
    'ngRoute'           // routing

    // Custom modules 

    // 3rd Party Modules

]);

// Execute bootstrapping code and any dependencies.
app.run(['$log',
    function ($log) {
        $log.log('we are loaded');
    }]);
})();

or

'use strict';

// Create the module and define its dependencies.
var app = angular.module('app', [
    // Angular modules 
    'ngAnimate',        // animations
    'ngRoute'           // routing

    // Custom modules 

    // 3rd Party Modules

]);

// Execute bootstrapping code and any dependencies.
app.run(['$log',
    function ($log) {
        $log.log('we are loaded');
    }]);

Both seem to work -- what is the difference?

I would appreciate explanation on what an anonymous function is, when i would use one, and why I see controllers written both ways for AngularJs.

Thanks!

2 Answers 2

35

Both will work. The reason you'll find a lot of JavaScript code wrapped in an anonymous function is to isolate it from other code on the page.

The following code will declare a variable called name on a global scope:

var name = "Hello World";

By using that code, any other script on the page attempting to use a variable called name could potentially get an unexpected value of "Hello World" because your script declared it as "Hello World".

By wrapping that code in an anonymous function, you keep the code from conflicting with other variables called name:

(function() {
    var name = "Hello World";
})();

In the example above, name is now only available inside of the scope of the anonymous function. It is not global, and therefore cannot conflict with other code on the page.

In the second code snippet you provided, app would now be a global variable that could potentially be overwritten by someone else declaring a global variable called app. By wrapping your Angular module in an anonymous function, you prevent your code from conflicting with other code.

Additionally, other people who may use your code won't have to worry about it changing their global scope.

9
  • Would you say this is really necessary then? I found myself doing this just because JSHint guidelines were setup like this. Feb 5, 2014 at 21:04
  • 2
    It's not required, your code would work fine without it, but it is a best practice for a good reason. As I outlined in the answer, not wrapping your code in some sort of isolating structure can cause it to interfere with other code on the page. As your project grows, you'll start to have issues. Depending on your experience with JavaScript, you may or may not have already experienced this. I can assure you with a fair level of certainty, though, that you that you will eventually encounter an issue with lack of code isolation. :) Feb 5, 2014 at 21:07
  • Although @JesseDunlap really nailed that answer, I'll just add that the code school's "Shaping up with angularJS" course sponsored by Google also recommends your first method. and I quote : "Wrapping your Javascript in a closure is a good habit". Jun 9, 2015 at 2:36
  • Great explanation. I was concerned with the wrapping of these functions keeping me from accessing angular variables in one file to the other, but I see that is not a problem. Again stated answer! Jul 25, 2015 at 8:40
  • I've recently seen an example in AngularJS where the code is wrapped in an anonymous function with parameters as in: Jan 23, 2016 at 18:50
4

JavaScript's local variable ONLY live in the function scope!

So if you use a IIFE (Immediately-invoked function expression), like below:

(function () {
   var app = angular.module('app', []);
})();

You can't access your module outside of the function:

(function () {
   var app = angular.module('app', []);
})();

// will get app is undefined error
app.run(['$log', function ($log) {
    $log.log('we are loaded');
}]);

Declare local variable instead of global variable is a good idea. That will let your app variable can't be accessed in the global environment.

If you declare a global variable, your variable can be used anywhere and maybe conflict with other javascript program.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.