56

I have a piece of my code where I'm supposed to create a switchboard. I want to return a list of all the switches that are on. Here "on" will equal True and "off" equal False. So now I just want to return a list of all the True values and their position. This is all I have but it only return the position of the first occurrence of True (this is just a portion of my code):

self.states = [False, False, False, False, True, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]

def which_switch(self):
    x = [self.states.index(i) for i in self.states if i == True]

This only returns "4"

78

Use enumerate, list.index returns the index of first match found.

>>> t = [False, False, False, False, True, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]
>>> [i for i, x in enumerate(t) if x]
[4, 5, 7]

For huge lists, it'd be better to use itertools.compress:

>>> from itertools import compress
>>> list(compress(xrange(len(t)), t))
[4, 5, 7]
>>> t = t*1000
>>> %timeit [i for i, x in enumerate(t) if x]
100 loops, best of 3: 2.55 ms per loop
>>> %timeit list(compress(xrange(len(t)), t))
1000 loops, best of 3: 696 µs per loop
  • Ahh I see, I saw some similar questions telling me to use enumerate, but I guess I was using it wrong. I was setting the list equal to x, then doing enumerate(x) but I guess all I was doing was enumerating 4? Is that what was happening? Thanks for the help – Charles Smith Jan 30 '14 at 22:12
  • Also what is happening when you do i for i, x in the list comprehension? I'm only used to seeing i for i for example, or a similar format, what is the function of x? Thanks – Charles Smith Jan 30 '14 at 22:30
  • 1
    @Amon enumerate returns a tuples(ind, value) during the loop, now we can assign the items of the tuple to two variables using: i, x = (ind, value). This is exactly what is happening in that loop. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 31 '14 at 5:51
  • Oh I see what's happening now. Thank a lot for your help! – Charles Smith Feb 1 '14 at 2:45
47

If you have numpy available:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> states = [False, False, False, False, True, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]
>>> np.where(states)[0]
array([4, 5, 7])
  • 7
    Note that this returns a tuple which requires np.where(states)[0] to actually use the results – Rufus Jan 16 '17 at 6:22
3

A much more efficient way is to use np.where. See the detailed comparison below, where it can be seen np.where outperforms both itertools.compress and also list comprehension.

Below I have compared the solutions proposed by the accepted answer (@Ashwini Chaudhary) with using numpy.where. Also note that in Python 3, xrange() is deprecated, i.e. xrange() is removed from python 3.x.

>>> from itertools import compress
>>> import numpy as np
>>> t = [False, False, False, False, True, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]`
>>> t = 1000*t
  • Method 1: Using list comprehension
>>> %timeit [i for i, x in enumerate(t) if x]
457 µs ± 1.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
  • Method 2: Using itertools.compress
>>> %timeit list(compress(range(len(t)), t))
210 µs ± 704 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
  • Method 3 (the fastest method): Using numpy.where
>>> %timeit np.where(t)
179 µs ± 593 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
2

You can use filter for it:

filter(lambda x: self.states[x], range(len(self.states)))

The range here enumerates elements of your list and since we want only those where self.states is True, we are applying a filter based on this condition.

For Python > 3.0:

list(filter(lambda x: self.states[x], range(len(self.states))))

1

Simply do this:

def which_index(self):
    return [
        i for i in range(len(self.states))
        if self.states[i] == True
    ]
  • Thank you for your contribution and welcome to StackOverflow. However, please read Editing Help to improve your formatting, and also add some explanation to your code. Thanks! – Will Oct 28 '18 at 14:45
0

Use dictionary comprehension way,

x = {k:v for k,v in enumerate(states) if v == True}

Input:

states = [False, False, False, False, True, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]

Output:

{4: True, 5: True, 7: True}
  • 2
    It's a dict-comprehension not list comprehension. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 31 '14 at 8:51
0

Using element-wise multiplication and a set:

>>> states = [False, False, False, False, True, True, False, True, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False]
>>> set(multiply(states,range(1,len(states)+1))-1).difference({-1})

Output: {4, 5, 7}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.