6

I have the next code:

object a,b,c;
fun (a);
fun (b);
fun (c);

I wonder if it is there any way to do something similar in C++98 or C++11 to:

call_fun_with (fun, a, b, c);

Thanks

  • 3
    You could quite easily write that yourself, using a function pointer, or functor for the first parameter. – benjymous Jan 30 '14 at 10:51
  • 3
    Put in std::vector and use std::for_each? – Some programmer dude Jan 30 '14 at 10:53
  • That is an option, but I wonder if there is a already some feature in C++ to deal with that – Vicente Adolfo Bolea Sánchez Jan 30 '14 at 10:54
  • 3
    @VicenteAdolfoBoleaSánchez, there is: put the sequence of inputs in a vector and use std::for_each (as JoachimPileborg said). That is the canonical way to do it. – utnapistim Jan 30 '14 at 10:56
6

You may use the following using variadic template:

template <typename F, typename...Ts>
void fun(F f, Ts&&...args)
{
    int dummy[] = {0, (f(std::forward<Ts>(args)), 0)...};
    static_cast<void>(dummy); // remove warning for unused variable
}

or in C++17, with folding expression:

template <typename F, typename...Ts>
void fun(F&& f, Ts&&...args)
{
    (static_cast<void>(f(std::forward<Ts>(args))), ...);
}

Now, test it:

void foo(int value) { std::cout << value << " "; }

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    fun(foo, 42, 53, 65);

    return 0;
}
  • Very elegant solution! – Vicente Adolfo Bolea Sánchez Jan 30 '14 at 11:17
  • The nice part is that this even works when foo is overloaded and/or cnversions are nededed: void foo(int); void foo(std::string); fun(foo, 42, "abc", 3.5); - will call foo(std::string("abc")) – MSalters Jan 30 '14 at 11:20
  • @Jarod42 You should read the comments on that page, the void cast is not a portable way to disable the warning herbsutter.com/2009/10/18/mailbag-shutting-up-compiler-warnings – galop1n Jan 30 '14 at 11:24
  • @MSalters: It will? I'm intrigued. Please tell me how. ;) – Xeo Jan 30 '14 at 11:53
  • 1
    It may works if F is a Functor as in struct foo { void operator () (int) const; void operator () (const std::string&) const; };. – Jarod42 Jan 30 '14 at 12:05
7

Here a variadic template solution.

#include <iostream>

template < typename f_>
void fun( f_&& f ) {}

template < typename f_, typename head_, typename... args_>
void fun( f_ f, head_&& head, args_&&... args) {
    f( std::forward<head_>(head) );
    fun( std::forward<f_>(f), std::forward<args_>(args)... );
}

void foo( int v ) {
    std::cout << v << " ";
}

int main() {
  int a{1}, b{2}, c{3};
  fun(foo, a, b, c );
}
  • 1
    I'd upvote you (since your solution has no overhead), but you're using illegal identifiers. Anything which contains a double underscore is reserved for the compiler and standard library. – Angew Jan 30 '14 at 11:03
  • this is what I was exactly looking for, Thank you so much! – Vicente Adolfo Bolea Sánchez Jan 30 '14 at 11:05
  • @Angew was sure it was only at the beginning of the identifier, fixed. – galop1n Jan 30 '14 at 11:06
  • Note to Visual Studio users, you need at least VS2013 to use Varadic Templates – benjymous Jan 30 '14 at 11:06
  • @benjymous Or VS2012 with the November CTP. – Angew Jan 30 '14 at 11:11
5

Using C++ 11, you can use std::function, this way (which is quite quick to write IMO)

void call_fun_with(std::function<void(int)> fun, std::vector<int>& args){
    for(int& arg : args){
        fun(arg);
    }
}

or, a bit more generic:

template<typename FTYPE>
void call_fun_with(FTYPE fun, std::vector<int>& args){
    for(int& arg : args){
        fun(arg);
    }
}

Live example

Live example, templated version

Note: std::function template arguments must be specified the following way: return_type(arg1_type, arg2_type,etc.)

EDIT: An alternative could be using std::for_each which actually does pretty much the same thing, but which I do not really like as to the semantics, which are more like "for everything in this container, do...". But that's just me and my (maybe silly) way of coding :)

  • Thats a great solution, Thanks for replying! :D – Vicente Adolfo Bolea Sánchez Jan 30 '14 at 10:59
  • Why are you taking the function as a std::function, instead of using a template parameter? Even when you don't have variadic templates, accepting the function type as a template parameter makes things a lot easier. – MSalters Jan 30 '14 at 11:15
  • @MSalters Well because to be frankly honest I don't really feel comfortable with that. Sure, this works though I'm not sure this would be the correct way to do it with a template parameter. – JBL Jan 30 '14 at 11:22
  • @JBL: That's indeed what I was thinking, can't see what would be wrong with that. – MSalters Jan 30 '14 at 14:27
1

there are a lot of different way's...

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

void foo(int x) {
    std::cout << x << "\n";
}

void call_fun_with(std::function<void(int)> fn, std::vector<int> lst) {
    for(auto it : lst)
      fn(it);
}

int main() {
    std::vector<int> val = {1,2,3,4,5};

    // c++98
    std::for_each(val.begin(), val.end(), foo);

    // c++11
    // vector
    call_fun_with(foo, val);

    // c++11
    // initializer_list
    int a=0, b=1, c=2;
    call_fun_with(foo, {a,b,c});
}

see here.

1

A C++11 range-based (enhanced) for loop will recognise a braced-init-list as an initializer_list, which means something like the following will work:

for (auto &x : {a,b,c}) fun(x);

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