40

I want to learn about how nl80211 and cfg80211 works in detail. Function flow, how nl80211 interact with network tools like wpa_supplicant, iw.

Plz suggest me some useful links or books to refer.

55

To be able to control wireless drivers from userspace, some IPC communication processes between kernel and userspace are used.

  • At first ioctl with vendor dependent APIs was used.
  • In 1996, Jean Tourrilhes creates wireless extensions (WE or WEXT).

The Wireless Extension (WE) is a generic API allowing a driver to expose to the user space configuration and statistics specific to common Wireless LANs.

  • In 2006, John Linville creates mac80211 and Johannes Berg creates cfg80211 and nl80211. Together it is intended to replace wireless extensions.

    +-------------+
    |             |
    |  Userspace  |
    |             |
    +-------------+
          ^
    - - - | - - - - 
          | nl80211
          v
    +-------------+
    |             |
    |  cfg80211   |
    |             |
    +-------------+
    +-------------+
    |             |
    |  mac80211   |
    |   driver    |
    |             |
    +-------------+
    

An important point is that nl80211/cfg80211/mac80211 no longer use ioctl, they use netlink.

So, tools like iw, hostapd or the wpa_supplicant use some netlink libraries (like libnl or libnl-tiny) and the netlink interface public header which is of course nl80211.h.

There is not so much documentations, but I advice you to read the libnl documentation and then the iw source code (because iw use libnl).

  • thanks for the brief overview. – Rafal Jan 31 '14 at 4:13
  • nl80211 act as an interface between userspace and kernel space.....i m having difficulty in understanding at what point control flow goes from user space to kernel space – Rafal Feb 3 '14 at 4:15
  • Have you read this. Netlink can be compared to a socket between the kernel and the user space. So the user can use it in a request-response way (e.g iw dev wlan0 link) and/or in an event way (e.g iw dev wlan0 event). – jml Feb 3 '14 at 10:33
  • thanks for the link but i have gone through that page.....for interaction between user n kernel space a socket is created...but when it comes to tracing the code i m not able to trace it from user space to kernel space....if anybody can help plz reply soon – Rafal Feb 4 '14 at 4:58
  • You can search in the linux-wireless mailing list or even try asking them. If you got a response, please post it, I'm very interested in and I don't have enough time to do it now! – jml Feb 4 '14 at 6:35
31

A slightly more detailed picture of how nl80211 and cfg80211 work with other parts of the system (user space, kernel, and hardware).

  • nl80211 is the interface between user space software (iw, wpa_supplicant, etc.) and the kernel (cfg80211 and mac80211 kernel modules, and specific drivers).
  • The WiFi drivers and hardware could be Full-MAC or Soft-MAC (see Wireless_network_interface_controller).
  • cfg80211_ops is a set of operations that Full-MAC drivers and mac80211 module register to cfg80211 module.
  • ieee80211_ops is a set of operations that Soft-MAC drivers register to mac80211 module.

enter image description here

  • lspci -k | grep -A 3 -i "network" returns me "Kernel driver in use: iwlwifi". Then modinfo iwlwifi | grep depends returns me "cfg80211". But how can I check about nl80211 and mac80211. Also, how do I know if the driver supports AP mode or not? – infoclogged Mar 19 '17 at 12:56
4

See my reply to How to learn the structure of Linux wireless drivers (mac80211)?

In wpa_supplicant, you can follow the code in src/drivers/driver_nl80211.c. This is a wpa_supplicant driver (not a kernel driver but an abstraction used in wpa_supplicant code) which uses libnl to communicate with the kernel cfg80211 module. When wpa_supplicant issues a scan for example then wpa_driver_nl80211_scan gets called. It builds the netlink message with a command called NL80211_CMD_TRIGGER_SCAN and with all the parameters required for the scan.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.