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I want to test method A of my class, but without calling the actual method B which is normally called by A. That's because B has a lot of external interactions I don't want to test for now.

I could create mocks for all the services called by B, but that's quite some work. I'd rather just mock B and make it return sample data.

Is that possible to do with Moq framework?

35

It is, with a catch! You have to make sure method B is virtual and can be overriden.

Then, set the mock to call the base methods whenever a setup is not provided. Then you setup B, but don't setup A. Because A was not setup, the actual implementation will be called.

var myClassMock = new Mock<MyClass>();
myClassMock.Setup(x => x.B()); //mock B

myClassMock.CallBase = true;

MyClass obj = myClassMock.Object;
obj.A(); // will call the actual implementation
obj.B(); // will call the mock implementation

Behinds the scenes, Moq will dynamically create a class that extends MyClass and overrides B.

  • 2
    Exactly, and it will be easiest if the virtual method B is either protected internal or public. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 30 '14 at 15:56
  • Question: What does the line CallBase = true; do? – Hace Oct 20 '16 at 9:33
  • 1
    @Hace If I recall correctly, it tells the mock object to call the methods defined in MyClass, unless an explicit setup is provided. If you did not call CallBase = true, then Moq would call a fake implementation of every virtual method, regardless of whether an explicit setup had been provided. – dcastro Oct 20 '16 at 11:00
  • Hi, @dcastro Thanks I found out the CallBase line is indeed necessary to ensure the method is being called, thanks – Hace Oct 20 '16 at 13:04
  • protected internal virtual does not show up on the mock setup? – Piotr Kula Nov 1 '17 at 11:25

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