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Is it possible to create a method that can temporarily pause itself by "returning" and then resuming when it is called again? It should act as if it never returned (i.e. retain all its variables, continue executing the next line, etc.).

public static void main(String args) {
   method(); //should start method
   //do stuff ONLY AFTER method() RETURNS
   method(); //should continue method at same place as it ended
   //do more stuff ONLY AFTER method() RETURNS
}

private static void method() {
   while(true) {
        //do stuff
        return;

        //do different stuff
        return;

        //do a third thing
        return;

        //then start all over
    }
}

I saw a few questions on StackOverflow that are similar, but none of the answers seemed sufficient or explanatory.

  • May I ask what you need this for? – Keppil Jan 31 '14 at 6:02
  • What are you really trying to do? – selbie Jan 31 '14 at 6:03
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    Make all the variables non-local, declare them outside the method in class. – Keerthivasan Jan 31 '14 at 6:10
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    @golddove - What you are asking for hasn't been invented yet.If you don't want to store "state" in a class instance variable, then you might be able to fake it with some sort of closure/lambda thing, but it won't be pretty. – selbie Jan 31 '14 at 6:18
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    @selbie C# has a couple of features that are very similar to this (yield return and await), so it certainly has been invented. It's just that Java doesn't support anything like this. – svick Jan 31 '14 at 14:19
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What you are looking for is similar to the yield return statement of C#: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9k7k7cf0.aspx

As far as I know, there is no similar construct for Java. If you are really desperate and not shy of heavy bytecode manipulation, you could get something rolling on you own:

First create a class with a static method named yieldReturn(). Then you could search all your classes for calls to that method and perform a modification along the lines of http://csharpindepth.com/articles/chapter6/iteratorblockimplementation.aspx

1

I think you're approaching the problem the wrong way, but if you insist, you could pass the state as parameters to the method or put the method in a different class and keep the state as instance variables

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I have not seen any effective continuation implementation in java, but there is another approach that might help you.

Actors (for instance Akka) can be used to implement finite state machines, especially since they 'switch context' and 'become' another state.

Effectively each method would manipulate the state, and before ending, the actor would switch to this enhanced state.

I find the approach easy enough compared to continuations, which can be somewhat enigmatic.

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Since it's tagged 'miltithreading', I guess the 'classic' way would be to thread off 'method()', make it an infinite loop and, instead of call/return, use wait/notify, or condvars, or a binary semaphore to exchange a flow 'token'.

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You can emulate a corutine like this:

class Coruntine extends Thread {
    Semaphore in = new Semaphore(0);
    Semaphore out = new Semaphore(0);
    boolean started=false;

    public Coruntine() {
        super.setDaemon(true);
    }

    public void method() {
        if (started) {
           in.release();
        } else {
            started=true;
            start();
        }
        try {
            out.acquire();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void _return() {
        out.release();
        try {
            in.acquire();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            System.out.println("do stuff 1");
            _return(); // like return

            System.out.println("do stuff 2");
            _return();

            System.out.println("do stuff 3");
            _return();

            // then start all over
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Coruntine c = new Coruntine();
    c.method(); // should start method
    System.out.println("do stuff AFTER method() RETURNS 1");
    c.method(); // should continue method at same place as it ended
    System.out.println("do stuff AFTER method() RETURNS 2");
    c.method(); // should continue method at same place as it ended
    System.out.println("do stuff AFTER method() RETURNS 3");
    c.method(); // should continue method at same place as it ended
    System.out.println("do stuff AFTER method() RETURNS 4");
}

if method() should return value and/or accept parameters, use blocking queues instead of semaphore(s).

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