I've ran into this problem a few times on various projects, and I've wondered if there's a better solution than the one I normally end up using.

Say we have a series of methods that need to execute, and we want to know if something goes wrong within one of the methods and break out gracefully (potentially undo-ing any previous changes...), I typically do the following (pseudo C# because it's what I'm most familiar with):

private bool SomeMethod()
{
    bool success = true;
    string errorMessage = null;
    success = TestPartA(ref errorMessage);
    if (success)
    {
        success = TestPartB(ref errorMessage);
    }
    if (success)
    {
        success = TestPartC(ref errorMessage);
    }
    if (success)
    {
        success = TestPartD(ref errorMessage);
    }
        //... some further tests: display the error message somehow, then:
        return success;
}

private bool TestPartA(ref string errorMessage)
{
    // Do some testing...
    if (somethingBadHappens)
    {
       errorMessage = "The error that happens";
       return false;
    }
    return true;
}

I just wondered (and this is my question) if there's a better methodology for coping with this kind of thing. I seem to end up writing a lot of if statements for something that seems like it should be slicker.

I've been suggested having a loop over a set of delegate functions, but I'd be worried that would be over-engineering the solution, unless there's a clean way to do it.

  • 1
    If these are truly errors, then you should probably be throwing exceptions. – Polyfun Jan 31 '14 at 9:43
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you should probably be using exceptions. Note you should generally only be catching exceptions at the "top level" in your application.

private void TopLevelMethod()
{
    try
    {
        SomeMethod();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Log/report exception/display to user etc.
    }
}

private void SomeMethod()
{
    TestPartA();
    TestPartB();
    TestPartC();
    TestPartD();
}

private void TestPartA()
{
    // Do some testing...
    try
    {
        if (somethingBadHappens)
        {
            throw new Exception("The error that happens");
        }
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        // Cleanup here. If no cleanup is possible, 
        // do not catch the exception here, i.e., 
        // try...catch would not be necessary in this method.

        // Re-throw the original exception.
        throw;
    }
}

private void TestPartB()
{
    // No need for try...catch because we can't do any cleanup for this method.
    if (somethingBadHappens)
    {
        throw new Exception("The error that happens");
    }
}

I have used the built-in System.Exception class in my example; you can create your own derived exception classes, or use the built-in ones derived from System.Exception.

  • I think you're right; thanks ShellShock. I never thought of throwing my own exception/re-throwing the exception, which covers pretty much every scenario. – loxdog Jan 31 '14 at 10:03

You could perhaps try looking at the "Open/Closed" section of the SOLID Principle. In your example you could perhaps create an ITestRule interface which contains a method called CheckRule() that will updated your message and return a bool. You would then create an interface implementation for each rule you want to test, and add that class to a List<ITestRule> object. From the Redmondo example above, I would change to the following:

var discountRules =
                new List<ITestRule>
                    {
                        new TestPartA(),
                        new TestPartB(),
                        new TestPartC(),
                        new TestPartD(),
                    };

You would then pass the new List<ITestRule> to an evaluator which will loop through each of the classes and runs the CheckRule() method.

  • This would work (and I might need something like this in future), but I think I'd be guilty of over-engineering for what I'd need. – loxdog Jan 31 '14 at 10:05

I try to stick to a principle known as 'Fail Fast'; methods should fail when they are supposed to, and return immediately with details of the error. The calling method then responds appropriately (re-throw the exception to its caller, log the details, show an error if it's a UI-bound method, etc): -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fail-fast

However, this does not mean using exceptions to control the flow of your application. Just raising an exception when you could deal with it is generally bad practice: -

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd264997.aspx

In your case, I'd re-write your code as (for example): -

private bool SomeMethod()
{
    bool success = false;

    try
    {
        TestPartA();
        TestPartB();
        TestPartC();
        TestPartD();

        success = true;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        LogError(ex.Message);
    }

    //... some further tests: display the error message somehow, then:
    return success;
}

private void TestPartA()
{
    // Do some testing...
    if (somethingBadHappens)
    {
        throw new ApplicationException("The error that happens");
    }
}
  • Pretty much the same answer as ShellShock, just a little slower! I like the Fail-fast principle though; invaluable reading. – loxdog Jan 31 '14 at 10:03
  • 1
    From msdn: "You should derive custom exceptions from the Exception class rather than the ApplicationException class. You should not throw an ApplicationException exception in your code, and you should not catch an ApplicationException exception unless you intend to re-throw the original exception. " – Gusdor Sep 9 '14 at 7:05

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