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I have an Ubuntu system and I have installed OpenSSL. Now I want to make changes to the config file. I searched my folders and found the following locations for the config files. Which is the main/correct one that I should use to make changes? I need to add an engine here. Any help would be appreciated. Here are the locations:

/usr/local/ssl/openssl.cnf
/usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf
/etc/ssl/openssl.cnf
36

/usr/local/ssl/openssl.cnf

This is a local installation. You downloaded and built OpenSSL taking the default prefix, of you configured with ./config --prefix=/usr/local/ssl or ./config --openssldir=/usr/local/ssl.

You will use this if you use the OpenSSL in /usr/local/ssl/bin. That is, /usr/local/ssl/openssl.cnf will be used when you issue:

/usr/local/ssl/bin/openssl s_client -connect localhost:443 -tls1 -servername localhost

/usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf

This is where Ubuntu places openssl.cnf for the OpenSSL they provide.

You will use this if you use the OpenSSL in /usr/bin. That is, /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf will be used when you issue:

openssl s_client -connect localhost:443 -tls1 -servername localhost

/etc/ssl/openssl.cnf

I don't know when this is used. The stuff in /etc/ssl is usually certificates and private keys, and it sometimes contains a copy of openssl.cnf. But I've never seen it used for anything.


Which is the main/correct one that I should use to make changes?

From the sounds of it, you should probably add the engine to /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf. That ensures most "off the shelf" gear will use the new engine.

After you do that, add it to /usr/local/ssl/openssl.cnf also because copy/paste is easy.


Here's how to see which openssl.cnf directory is associated with a OpenSSL installation. The library and programs look for openssl.cnf in OPENSSLDIR. OPENSSLDIR is a configure option, and its set with --openssldir.

I'm on a MacBook with 3 different OpenSSL's (Apple's, MacPort's and the one I build):

# Apple    
$ /usr/bin/openssl version -a | grep OPENSSLDIR
OPENSSLDIR: "/System/Library/OpenSSL"

# MacPorts
$ /opt/local/bin/openssl version -a | grep OPENSSLDIR
OPENSSLDIR: "/opt/local/etc/openssl"

# My build of OpenSSL
$ openssl version -a | grep OPENSSLDIR
OPENSSLDIR: "/usr/local/ssl/darwin"

I have an Ubuntu system and I have installed openssl.

Just bike shedding, but be careful of Ubuntu's version of OpenSSL. It disables TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2, so you will only have clients capable of older cipher suites; and you will not be able to use newer ciphers like AES/CTR (to replace RC4) and elliptic curve gear (like ECDHE_ECDSA_* and ECDHE_RSA_*). See Ubuntu 12.04 LTS: OpenSSL downlevel version is 1.0.0, and does not support TLS 1.2 in Launchpad.

EDIT: Ubuntu enabled TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2 recently. See Comment 17 on the bug report.

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  • 6
    I believe /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf is just a symbolic link to the /etc/ssl/openssl.cnf, as that is what is in in my install of openssl. file /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf gives /usr/lib/ssl/openssl.cnf: symbolic link to '/etc/ssl/openssl.cnf' – vincentleest Aug 6 '15 at 17:25
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RHEL: /etc/pki/tls/openssl.cnf

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  • 3
    Same with centos 7.x – forbidder Oct 18 '19 at 1:44
  • 2
    Same with Fedora 31. – Akito Nov 25 '19 at 16:13
7

/usr/local/ssl/openssl.cnf

is soft link of

/etc/ssl/openssl.cnf

You can see that using long list (ls -l) on the /usr/local/ssl/ directory where you will find

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 20 Mar 1 05:15 openssl.cnf -> /etc/ssl/openssl.cnf

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0

On my CentOS 6 I have two openssl.cnf :

/openvpn/easy-rsa/
/pki/tls/
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  • Since this is a very old question, could you add a bit more info to your answer to justify it being relevant? – theblackips Jul 1 '19 at 13:38

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