8

I've been racking my brains and can't figure out why there should be an import error when 'views' is imported. I get the following message when I visit my index page:

"
Request Method: GET
Request URL:    http://127.0.0.1:8000/moments/
Django Version: 1.6.1
Exception Type: ImportError
Exception Value:    
No module named views
Exception Location: C:\Python27\lib\site-packages\django\utils\importlib.py in import_module, line 40
"

Here is my urls.py

from django.conf.urls import patterns, url

from moments_app import views

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^$', "views.index", name='index'),
    url(r'^$', "views.choose_dataset", name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', "views.get_moments", name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', "views.learn", name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', "views.detail", name='detail'),

)

I clearly have a module named views in my moments_app folder. Also, moments_app is in my path. Does anyone have any ideas as to what might be causing this?

  • 2
    from moments_app import views has no affect if you use string based imports. – Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 31 '14 at 16:36
13

You prefixed your route names with a relative module name. Use an absolute name:

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^$', "moments_app.views.index", name='index'),
    url(r'^$', "moments_app.views.choose_dataset", name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', "moments_app.views.get_moments", name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', "moments_app.views.learn", name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', "moments_app.views.detail", name='detail'),
)

or better still, use the first argument to specify the full module path:

urlpatterns = patterns('moments_app.views',
    url(r'^$', "index", name='index'),
    url(r'^$', "choose_dataset", name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', "get_moments", name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', "views.learn", name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', "detail", name='detail'),
)

although a combination of the two is also allowed:

urlpatterns = patterns('moments_app',
    url(r'^$', "views.index", name='index'),
    url(r'^$', "views.choose_dataset", name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', "views.get_moments", name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', "views.learn", name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', "views.detail", name='detail'),
)
7

Two year update:

In Django 1.8 and later both string views and the patterns function are deprecated, resulting in a simpler and more reliable syntax:

from django.conf.urls import url

from . import views

urlpatterns = [
    url(r'^$', views.index, name='index'),
    url(r'^$', views.choose_dataset, name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', views.get_moments, name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', views.learn, name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', views.detail, name='detail'),
]

Note that there are no "relative" or "absolute" view names with the callable syntax -- if you import the views module you get its definitions. I'd avoid importing the individual view functions since there's a tiny chance that another import could define a colliding name. If you're not worried about collisions and don't mind putting your app name in the file, the urls can be slightly shortened:

from moments_app.views import index, choose_dataset, get_moments, learn, detail

urlpatterns = [
    url(r'^$', index, name='index'),
    url(r'^$', choose_dataset, name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', get_moments, name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', learn, name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', detail, name='detail'),
]
1

You have imported your view as

from moments_app import views

Some times it won't work.

Use this

from moments_app.views import *


urlpatterns = patterns('',

    url(r'^$', index, name='index'),
    url(r'^$', choose_dataset, name='choose'),
    url(r'^get_moments/', get_moments, name='get_moments'),
    url(r'^learn/$', learn, name='learn'),
    url(r'^(?P<moment_id>\d+)/$', detail, name='detail'),

)

It will work..

0

Just Change import statement to

import appname.views

This works fine for my code.

  • While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – double-beep Apr 1 at 8:21

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