43

I need to create a new DATETIME column in SQL Server that will always contain the date of when the record was created, and then it needs to automatically update whenever the record is modified. I've heard people say I need a trigger, which is fine, but I don't know how to write it. Could somebody help with the syntax for a trigger to accomplish this?

In MySQL terms, it should do exactly the same as this MySQL statement:

ADD `modstamp` timestamp NULL 
    DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

Here are a few requirements:

  • I can't alter my UPDATE statements to set the field when the row is modified, because I don't control the application logic that writes to the records.
  • Ideally, I would not need to know the names of any other columns in the table (such as the primary key)
  • It should be short and efficient, because it will happen very often.
3
  • 2
    Create an after update trigger which updates the field to getdate()
    – M.Ali
    Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 2:00
  • That's what I was thinking, except I don't know MS-SQL well enough to write the trigger. Any chance you could help with that? Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 2:17
  • Can a persisted computed column be used? The idea is that the column would be calculated using the current date. Creates and updates would both cause the value to be set. Commented Mar 29, 2023 at 17:03

5 Answers 5

56

SQL Server doesn't have a way to define a default value for UPDATE.

So you need to add a column with default value for inserting:

ADD modstamp DATETIME2 NULL DEFAULT GETDATE()

And add a trigger on that table:

CREATE TRIGGER tgr_modstamp
ON **TABLENAME**
AFTER UPDATE AS
  UPDATE **TABLENAME**
  SET ModStamp = GETDATE()
  WHERE **ID** IN (SELECT DISTINCT **ID** FROM Inserted)

And yes, you need to specify a identity column for each trigger.

CAUTION: take care when inserting columns on tables where you don't know the code of the application. If your app have INSERT VALUES command without column definition, it will raise errors even with default value on new columns.

6
  • 9
    You don't need the distinct in the sub-select for two reasons: first: the in operator will handle it correctly, second: the id must be the primary key in order to make your trigger work and therefore the distinct will never remove any values because all the values for id are unique by definition.
    – user330315
    Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 12:11
  • Thank you for your answer. It sucks that MS-SQL requires a primary key; I'm automating a setup process and I don't know the PK at the time I'm creating the modstamp field. Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 14:51
  • 3
    Won't the update inside the trigger, fire again the trigger, creating an infinite loop?
    – alfoks
    Commented Mar 27, 2017 at 10:21
  • 2
    @alfoks: by default, no. The trigger will not recursively call the same trigger. However, if the db setting RECURSIVE_TRIGGERS is enabled, then this specific trigger would cause an infinite loop and pass the limit of 32 nested triggers, and the full batch would be rolled back.
    – Evadman
    Commented May 2, 2018 at 18:09
  • If you're using datetime2 then you should probably use functions that return this type. Like SYSUTCDATETIME() or SYSDATETIME().
    – sigod
    Commented Jul 25, 2022 at 11:31
23

This is possible since SQL Server 2016 by using PERIOD FOR SYSTEM_TIME.

This is something that was introduced for temporal tables but you don't have to use temporal tables to use this.

An example is below

CREATE TABLE dbo.YourTable
(  
    FooId INT PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,   
    FooName VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
    modstamp DATETIME2 GENERATED ALWAYS AS ROW START NOT NULL,   
    MaxDateTime2 DATETIME2 GENERATED ALWAYS AS ROW END HIDDEN NOT NULL,     
    PERIOD FOR SYSTEM_TIME (modstamp,MaxDateTime2)    
)  

INSERT INTO dbo.YourTable (FooId, FooName)
VALUES      (1,'abc');

SELECT *
FROM   dbo.YourTable;

WAITFOR DELAY '00:00:05'

UPDATE dbo.YourTable
SET    FooName = 'xyz'
WHERE  FooId = 1;

SELECT *
FROM   dbo.YourTable;

DROP TABLE dbo.YourTable; 

enter image description here

It has some limitations.

  • The time stored will be updated by the system and always be UTC.
  • There is a need to declare a second column (MaxDateTime2 above) that is completely superfluous for this use case. But it can be marked as hidden making it easier to ignore.
4
  • 4
    Interesting approach. All documentation here mentions PERIOD FOR SYSTEM TIME in conjunction with temporal tables (SYSTEM_VERSIONING = ON). I can't find anything elsewhere about it being standalone either. Is it a fluke that this works without system versioning? I am afraid of using it, and then finding out that it is an undocumented feature that they "correct" in the future, pulling it out from under me. Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 21:07
  • I tried temporal tables when they first came out. I have worked with 3 companies and none of the DBAs used them. So (1) I don't find them to be in common use, (2) I agree with Seth above, I don't feel comfortable using code for unintended purposes in an an enterprise setting Commented Sep 15, 2020 at 17:37
  • 3
  • This is an awesome approach, thanks for sharing @MartinSmith
    – artofsql
    Commented Apr 18 at 18:36
19

Okay, I always like to keep track of not only when something happened but who did it!

Lets create a test table in [tempdb] named [dwarfs]. At a prior job, a financial institution, we keep track of inserted (create) date and updated (modify) date.

-- just playing
use tempdb;
go

-- drop table
if object_id('dwarfs') > 0
drop table dwarfs
go

-- create table
create table dwarfs
(
asigned_id int identity(1,1),
full_name varchar(16),
ins_date datetime,
ins_name sysname,
upd_date datetime,
upd_name sysname,
);
go

-- insert/update dates
alter table dwarfs
    add constraint [df_ins_date] default (getdate()) for ins_date;
alter table dwarfs
    add constraint [df_upd_date] default (getdate()) for upd_date;

-- insert/update names
alter table dwarfs
    add constraint [df_ins_name] default (coalesce(suser_sname(),'?')) for ins_name;

alter table dwarfs
    add constraint [df_upd_name] default (coalesce(suser_sname(),'?')) for upd_name;
go

For updates, but the inserted and deleted tables exist. I choose to join on the inserted for the update.

-- create the update trigger
create trigger trg_changed_info on dbo.dwarfs
for update
as
begin

    -- nothing to do?
    if (@@rowcount = 0)
      return;

    update d
    set 
       upd_date = getdate(),
       upd_name = (coalesce(suser_sname(),'?'))
    from
       dwarfs d join inserted i 
    on 
       d.asigned_id = i.asigned_id;

end
go

Last but not least, lets test the code. Anyone can type a untested TSQL statement in. However, I always stress testing to my team!

-- remove data
truncate table dwarfs;
go

-- add data
insert into dwarfs (full_name) values
('bilbo baggins'),
('gandalf the grey');
go

-- show the data
select * from dwarfs;

-- update data
update dwarfs 
set full_name = 'gandalf'
where asigned_id = 2;

-- show the data
select * from dwarfs;

The output. I only waited 10 seconds between the insert and the delete. Nice thing is that who and when are both captured.

enter image description here

1
  • Suggestion. In a trigger, IF UPDATE(column_name) can be used to ensure the code does not run when the column has already been updated. Commented Oct 18, 2022 at 13:13
8
Create trigger tr_somename 
On table_name
For update
As 
Begin
    Set nocount on; 
       Update t
        Set t.field_name = getdate()
        From table_name t inner join inserted I 
        On t.pk_column = I.pk_column
End
3
  • Sorry I'm using a mobile phone if you could just format the answer properly in code mode it will make a lot more sense
    – M.Ali
    Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 2:27
  • 4
    ROFLOL - Ali I have to give you points from just doing it on your phone. I hope you are not driving while answering the post!
    – CRAFTY DBA
    Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 3:05
  • What is the purpose of nocount on? Is it necessary to turn it off at some point? Commented Feb 1, 2014 at 15:28
2
ALTER TRIGGER [trg_table_name_Modified]
ON [table_name]
AFTER UPDATE 
AS
Begin
    UPDATE table_name
    SET modified_dt_tm = GETDATE()  -- or use SYSDATETIME() for 2008 and newer
    FROM Inserted i
    WHERE i.ID = table_name.id

    end

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