32

Lets say I have this array:

$array = array('a'=>1,'z'=>2,'d'=>4);

Later in the script, I want to add the value 'c'=>3 before 'z'. How can I do this?

Yes, the order is important. When I run a foreach() through the array, I do NOT want this newly added value added to the end of the array. I am getting this array from a mysql_fetch_assoc()

The keys I used above are placeholders. Using ksort() will not achieve what I want.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.array-splice.php#88896 accomplishes what I'm looking for but I'm looking for something simpler.

Take a sample db table with about 30 columns. I get this data using mysql_fetch_assoc(). In this new array, after column 'pizza' and 'drink', I want to add a new column 'full_dinner' that combines the values of 'pizza' and 'drink' so that when I run a foreach() on the said array, 'full_dinner' comes directly after 'drink'

9
  • i didnt downvote you. i believe my uasort answer should be helpful for your purposes.
    – badideas
    Jan 27, 2010 at 18:57
  • 2
    What could be easier than array_splice to insert a value? I think it's important to clearly define what you're intending on doing from the start.
    – spoulson
    Jan 27, 2010 at 18:57
  • 4
    I would say that if you're being picky about the order of this array, something smells with your design. Could you tell us why you need them in order, more detail about what the array actually contains? Maybe then we can suggest alternative designs to avoid the question altogether.
    – Tesserex
    Jan 27, 2010 at 19:02
  • 1
    @spoulson beat me to it - @Citizen, if you can, give us a real-world example of how you envisage using the data afterwards, and why it's important to preserve the order. It's tricky to answer if we're only getting half the story :-)
    – richsage
    Jan 27, 2010 at 19:02
  • 1
    I as well don't like that there are people that downvote questions just because they don't know the answer. Regarding the question I found php.net/manual/en/class.arrayiterator.php to be useful, but seems that there is no way to accomplish this particular task using iterators.
    – TomTom
    Jan 9, 2013 at 9:25

13 Answers 13

48
+50

Am I missing something?

$key = 'z';
$offset = array_search($key, array_keys($array));

$result = array_merge
        (
            array_slice($array, 0, $offset),
            array('c' => 3),
            array_slice($array, $offset, null)
        );

Handling of nonexistent keys (appending $data by default):

function insertBeforeKey($array, $key, $data = null)
{
    if (($offset = array_search($key, array_keys($array))) === false) // if the key doesn't exist
    {
        $offset = 0; // should we prepend $array with $data?
        $offset = count($array); // or should we append $array with $data? lets pick this one...
    }

    return array_merge(array_slice($array, 0, $offset), (array) $data, array_slice($array, $offset));
}

Demo:

$array = array('a' => 1, 'z' => 2, 'd' => 4);

// array(4) { ["a"]=> int(1) ["c"]=> int(3) ["z"]=> int(2) ["d"]=> int(4) }
var_dump(insertBeforeKey($array, 'z', array('c' => 3)));

// array(4) { ["a"]=> int(1) ["z"]=> int(2) ["d"]=> int(4) ["c"]=> int(3) }
var_dump(insertBeforeKey($array, 'y', array('c' => 3)));
6
  • Yes. That I answered exactly the same one day before you. :)
    – nem75
    Mar 28, 2012 at 8:28
  • @nem75: Oh, indeed! I just noticed it now, sorry. Do you want me to delete it?
    – Alix Axel
    Mar 28, 2012 at 12:56
  • @AlixAxel, thanks for your solution. But what if the element is not present, i.e. $offset is NULL?
    – Tomas
    Mar 28, 2012 at 19:39
  • @Tomas: That's pretty easy too (check my edit), the only thing you have to decide is if you want to prepend ($offset = 0) or append ($offset = count($array)) the value.
    – Alix Axel
    Mar 28, 2012 at 23:18
  • 2
    @Tomas: The typecast is to make sure you can still use scalar values in $data like 3 instead of array('c' => 3).
    – Alix Axel
    Mar 29, 2012 at 16:19
14

A simple approach to this is to iterate through the original array, constructing a new one as you go:

function InsertBeforeKey( $originalArray, $originalKey, $insertKey, $insertValue ) {

    $newArray = array();
    $inserted = false;

    foreach( $originalArray as $key => $value ) {

        if( !$inserted && $key === $originalKey ) {
            $newArray[ $insertKey ] = $insertValue;
            $inserted = true;
        }

        $newArray[ $key ] = $value;

    }

    return $newArray;

}

Then simply call

$array = InsertBeforeKey( $array, 'd', 'c', 3 );
4
  • 3
    This does it, but I find it hard to believe that a simpler method does not exist.
    – Citizen
    Jan 27, 2010 at 19:09
  • In my answer below, I added an option based on ArrayObject that makes the interface to this simpler, but it probably executes slower. You could always modify it to use this iteration approach instead of the sort approach. Jan 27, 2010 at 19:57
  • nice, I created my librarly functions from your solution before I placed the bounty and got the slice solution. I guess I won't rewrite my library func anyway :)
    – Tomas
    Mar 26, 2012 at 12:50
  • But there's a small problem with your function - you should use === instead of ==. Try this: InsertBeforeKey(array(0=>"a", ""=>"b"), "", "c", "new") - it should insert the c=>new as second element but with == it inserts as first. I corrected the problem.
    – Tomas
    Mar 26, 2012 at 13:00
11

According to your original question the best answer I can find is this:

$a = array('a'=>1,'z'=>2,'d'=>4);

$splitIndex = array_search('z', array_keys($a));
$b = array_merge(
        array_slice($a, 0, $splitIndex), 
        array('c' => 3), 
        array_slice($a, $splitIndex)
);

var_dump($b);
array(4) {
  ["a"]=>
  int(1)
  ["c"]=>
  int(3)
  ["z"]=>
  int(2)
  ["d"]=>
  int(4)
}

Depending on how big your arrays are you will duplicate quite some data in internal memory, regardless if you use this solution or another.

Furthermore your fifth edit seems to indicate that alternatively your SQL query could be improved. What you seem to want to do there would be something like this:

SELECT a, b, CONCAT(a, ' ', b) AS ab FROM ... WHERE ...

If changing your SELECT statement could make the PHP solution redundant, you should definitely go with the modified SQL.

3
  • Looks good. But what if the splitIndex results as FALSE, i.e. the searched element is not present?
    – Tomas
    Mar 26, 2012 at 13:12
  • From the original question I deduced that the index inidicating where to insert is known exactly. I think pretty much every solution proposed here is built on this assumption ...
    – nem75
    Mar 28, 2012 at 8:31
  • 2
    to be on the safe side: if ($splitIndex===false) { $a['c'] = 3}? if the key is not found, there is nothing to insert before, so just push to the end of the array... Mar 28, 2012 at 10:52
5
function insertValue($oldArray, $newKey, $newValue, $followingKey) {

    $newArray = array ();
    foreach (array_keys($oldArray) as $k) {
        if ($k == $followingKey)
            $newArray[$newKey] = $newValue;
        $newArray[$k] = $oldArray [$k];
    }

    return $newArray;
}

You call it as

insertValue($array, 'c', '3', 'z')

As for Edit 5:

edit your sql, so that it reads

SELECT ..., pizza, drink, pizza+drink as full_meal, ... FROM ....

and you have the column automatically:

Array (
  ...
  'pizza' => 12,
  'drink' => 5,
  'full_meal' => 17,
  ...
)
0

Associative arrays are not ordered, so you can simply add with $array['c'] = 3.

If order is important, one option is switch to a data structure more like:

$array = array(
   array('a' => 1),
   array('b' => 2)
   array('d' => 4)
);

Then, use array_splice($array, 2, 0, array('c' => 3)) to insert at position 2. See manual on array_splice.

4
  • This answer also isn't very dynamic, it will only work if you want to insert the new array value into position 3. Jan 27, 2010 at 18:49
  • From the question: "Later in the script, I want to add the value 'c'=>3 before 'd'. How can I do this?"
    – spoulson
    Jan 27, 2010 at 18:56
  • @ILMV At least spoulson's solution works similarly to what I need. I really want to keep the current associations so this wont work but its a lot closer than ILMV's "answer" that any php newbie would have already known.
    – Citizen
    Jan 27, 2010 at 18:59
  • 1
    1st paragraph is not true: PHP array IS ordered map
    – Tomas
    Mar 22, 2012 at 13:03
0

An alternative approach is to supplement the associative array structure with an ordered index that determines the iterative order of keys. For instance:

$index = array('a','b','d');

// Add new value and update index
$array['c'] = 3;
array_splice($index, 2, 0, 'c');

// Iterate the array in order
foreach $index as $key {
   $value = $array[$key];
}
1
  • This is not exactly a simple solution. I might as well unset all the variables after my location, add the variable, and then readd the unset'd variables.
    – Citizen
    Jan 27, 2010 at 18:51
0

You can define your own sortmap when doing a bubble-sort by key. It's probably not terribly efficient but it works.

<pre>
<?php

$array = array('a'=>1,'z'=>2,'d'=>4);

$array['c'] = 3;

print_r( $array );

uksort( $array, 'sorter' );

print_r( $array );

function sorter( $a, $b )
{
    static $ordinality = array(
        'a' => 1
      , 'c' => 2
      , 'z' => 3
      , 'd' => 4
    );
    return $ordinality[$a] - $ordinality[$b];
}

?>
</pre>

Here's an approach based on ArrayObject using this same concept

$array = new CitizenArray( array('a'=>1,'z'=>2,'d'=>4) );
$array['c'] = 3;

foreach ( $array as $key => $value )
{
    echo "$key: $value <br>";
}

class CitizenArray extends ArrayObject
{
    static protected $ordinality = array(
        'a' => 1
      , 'c' => 2
      , 'z' => 3
      , 'd' => 4
    );

    function offsetSet( $key, $value )
    {
        parent::offsetSet( $key, $value );
        $this->uksort( array( $this, 'sorter' ) );
    }

    function sorter( $a, $b )
    {
        return self::$ordinality[$a] - self::$ordinality[$b];
    }
}
4
  • While your code may be correct, I don't believe it applies to question at hand. @Citizen is looking to insert relative to a specific key, not have an implicit ordering over all possible keys. Jan 27, 2010 at 20:06
  • I think it's arguable that, in some circumstances, they are the exact same thing. There's actually not enough info in his question to determine which he's implying 100%. Jan 27, 2010 at 20:13
  • Although not a perfect solution, I thought it was informative and at the very least deserves not to have a negative vote :) Thanks peter for the extra info.
    – Citizen
    Jan 27, 2010 at 21:35
  • very messy and not at all simple. Bunch of classes for one simple requirement.
    – Tomas
    Mar 26, 2012 at 12:47
0

For the moment the best i can found to try to minimize the creation of new arrays are these two functions :

the first one try to replace value into the original array and the second one return a new array.

// replace value into the original array
function insert_key_before_inplace(&$base, $beforeKey, $newKey, $value) {
 $index = 0;
 foreach($base as $key => $val) {
    if ($key==$beforeKey) break;
    $index++;
 }
 $end = array_splice($base, $index, count($base)-$index);
 $base[$newKey] = $value;
 foreach($end as $key => $val) $base[$key] = $val;
}


$array = array('a'=>1,'z'=>2,'d'=>4);

insert_key_before_inplace($array, 'z', 'c', 3);

var_export($array); // array ( 'a' => 1, 'c' => 3, 'z' => 2, 'd' => 4, )

// create new array
function insert_key_before($base, $beforeKey, $newKey, $value) {
 $index = 0;
 foreach($base as $key => $val) {
    if ($key==$beforeKey) break;
    $index++;
 }
 $end = array_splice($base, $index, count($base)-$index);
 $base[$newKey] = $value;
 return $base+$end;
}


$array = array('a'=>1,'z'=>2,'d'=>4);

$newArray=insert_key_before($array, 'z', 'c', 3);

var_export($array); // ( 'a' => 1, 'z' => 2, 'd' => 4, )

var_export($newArray); // array ( 'a' => 1, 'c' => 3, 'z' => 2, 'd' => 4, )
0
function putarrayelement(&$array, $arrayobject, $elementposition, $value = null) {

        $count = 0;
        $return = array();
        foreach ($array as $k => $v) {
        if ($count == $elementposition) {
                if (!$value) {
                    $value = $count;
                }
            $return[$value] = $arrayobject;
            $inserted = true;
        }
        $return[$k] = $v;
        $count++;
        }
        if (!$value) {
           $value = $count;
        }
        if (!$inserted){
            $return[$value];
        }
        $array = $return;
       return $array;
     }

        $array = array('a' => 1, 'z' => 2, 'd' => 4);
        putarrayelement($array, '3', 1, 'c');
        print_r($array);
0

Great usage of array functions but how about this as a simpler way:

Add a static column to the SQL and then replace it in the resultant array. Order stays the same:

SQL :

Select pizza , drink , 'pizza-drink' as 'pizza-drink' , 28 columns..... From Table

Array :

$result['pizza-drink'] = $result['pizza'] . $result['drink'];
0

A simplified Alix Axel function if you need to just insert data in nth position:

function array_middle_push( array $array, int $position, array $data ): array {
   return array_merge( array_slice( $array, 0, $position ), $data, array_slice( $array, $position ) );
}
-1

Try this

$array['c']=3;

An associative array is not ordered by default, but if you wanted to sort them alphabetically you could use ksort() to sort the array by it's key.

If you check out the PHP article for ksort() you will se it's easy to sort an array by its key, for example:

<?php
$fruits = array("d"=>"lemon", "a"=>"orange", "b"=>"banana", "c"=>"apple");
ksort($fruits);
foreach ($fruits as $key => $val) {
    echo "$key = $val\n";
}
?>

// The above example will output:
a = orange
b = banana
c = apple
d = lemon
9
  • Like I said, use ksort(), that will reorder your array by ke, so instead of a, b, d, c it will be a, b, c, d Jan 27, 2010 at 18:43
  • Yes it will, each array item has a key, and therefore ksort() will sort it. Jan 27, 2010 at 18:47
  • What do you mean by placeholders? Form the information you've given this answer should work. Jan 27, 2010 at 18:47
  • I'm getting the info from a mysql_fetch_assoc(). The keys are not in alphabetical order.
    – Citizen
    Jan 27, 2010 at 18:49
  • 1
    Ok well it was nice of you to explain that in your question. How is anyone supposed to give an accurate answer when the question isn't telling the entire story. Jan 27, 2010 at 18:51
-1

you can add it by doing

$array['c']=3;

and if you absolutely want it sorted for printing purposes, you can use php's ksort($array) function

if the keys are not sortable by ksort, then you will have to create your own sort by using php's uasort function. see examples here

http://php.net/manual/en/function.uasort.php

2
  • Is it possible to use uasort on a single record? I have hundreds of records in this array.
    – Citizen
    Jan 27, 2010 at 19:02
  • in uasort, what you're doing is feeding it a a comparator for your keys. your array can be as big or small as you want it to be.
    – badideas
    Jan 27, 2010 at 19:24

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