1

I have this scenario where I have 4 types of animals:

A]. Cat

  i. Name - property

  ii.Speak - operation

B]. Wild Cat

  i. Name - property

  ii.Speak - operation

  iii. Hunt - operation

C]. Dog

  i. Name - property

  ii.Speak - operation

D]. Wild Dog

  i. Name - property

  ii.Speak - operation

  iii. Hunt - operation

Now, I had to implement class hierarchy for the above four animals. I did it as below:

/////////////////////////Interface iAnimal///////////////////////////////
Interface iAnimalHunter{
    Hunts();
}
Interface iAnimalSpeach{
    Speaks();
}

/////////////////////////Abstract class Animal///////////////////////////////
Abstract class Animal{
    Protected String name;
    protected function Speaks(){
    }
}

/////////////////////////Class Cat///////////////////////////////
Class Cat extends Animal implements iAnimalSpeach{
    Public function Speaks(){
    }
}

/////////////////////////Class WildCat///////////////////////////////
Class WildCat extends Cat implements iAnimalSpeach, iAnimalHunter{
    Public function Speaks(){
    }
    Public function Hunts(){
    }
}

/////////////////////////Class Dog///////////////////////////////
Class Dog extends Animal implements iAnimalSpeach{
    Public function Speaks(){
    }
}

/////////////////////////Class WildDog///////////////////////////////
Class WildDog extends Dog implements iAnimalSpeach, iAnimalHunter{
    Public function Speaks(){
    }
    Public function Hunts(){
    }
}

Am I right in using interfaces for this purpose or a simple abstract class (without the interfaces, allowing child classes to override the hunt() and speak() methods when required) would have been a better approach in terms of object oriented design pattern? Which would be a better way?

0

You have done it well. Wild Cat and Dog are derived from Cat and Dog classes, which have no hunt() method. So, they have to get it independently. Having several parents is forbidden in most languages including Java. So, you have to get hunt() from interface. It is better, that create the function independently. And if the hunting is the same for both wild things, you can declare it in interface as default method and define it there!

As for another function, speak(), you can do it as you have done - for consistency, or put it into Animal class and override it in concrete classes. It has sense, because it looks, both cats will have the same speak() method, the same as the dogs.

As for interfaces name, I would name one of them not Speech, but Speaker, analogous to Hunter.

And notice, in Java they are not operations, but methods.

  • although the language-specific code was not the intention but thanks for the corrections and putting forth the alternative solution. – xmaestro Feb 2 '14 at 9:29
  • 1
    On the contrary, using two parents is much more language-specific. We can't abstract absolutely from the real life. And have a +1 - I think, it is a good example, where use interfaces and where not. – Gangnus Feb 2 '14 at 10:48

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