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In 20+ years programming in C I've used a base other than 10 once, so when I found my trusty MSVC's _itoa() missing in another environment, I set out to write one that only does base 10, and puts the destination buffer argument, pointing to the storage returned by the function, on the left, instead of on the right, like all of the string functions in the C Standard Library. I believe this code is also thread-safe.

Is there a faster way to do this?

I was also going to ask about correctness, but I believe the included test code proves it works, even for the particular case of LONG_MIN, which is (-1 * LONG_MAX) -1, which caused a failure in the code until I changed tactics, noted the sign, and then copied the signed int to an unsigned int. I then did all of the core work in the function in unsigned ints - which happily ran in 75% of the time as well.

char * _i32toa(char *const rtn, int32_t i)    {
    if (NULL == rtn) return NULL;

    // declare local buffer, and write to it back-to-front
    char buff[12];
    uint32_t  ut, ui;
    char minus_sign=0;
    char *p = buff + sizeof(buff)-1;
    *p-- = 0;    // nul-terminate buffer

    // deal with negative numbers while using an unsigned integer
    if (i < 0)    {
        minus_sign = '-';
        ui = (uint32_t)((int)-1 * (int)i);
    }    else    {
        ui = i;
    }

    // core code here...
    while (ui > 9) {
        ut = ui;
        ui /= 10;
        *p-- = (ut - (ui * 10)) + '0';
    }
    *p = ui + '0';

    if ('-' == minus_sign) *--p = minus_sign;

    // knowing how much storage we needed, copy chars from buff to rtn...
    memcpy(rtn, p, sizeof(buff)-(p - buff));

    return rtn;
}

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#define LOOP_KNT (SHRT_MAX * 1024)
// ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main(void)    {
    time_t start = clock();

    int32_t t = 123456, i;
    char *buff = (char *)malloc(256);

    for (i = (SHRT_MIN *1024); i < LOOP_KNT; i++)    {
        _i32toa(buff, i);
    }
    printf("\nElapsed time was %f milliseconds", (double)clock() - (double)(start));

    start = clock();
    for (i = (SHRT_MIN * 1024); i < LOOP_KNT; i++)    {
        _itoa(i, buff, 10);
    }
    printf("\nElapsed time was %f milliseconds", (double)clock() - (double)(start));

    start = clock();
    for (i = (SHRT_MIN * 1024); i < LOOP_KNT; i++)    {
        ___itoa(i, buff, 10);
    }
    printf("\nElapsed time was %f milliseconds", (double)clock() - (double)(start));

    printf("\nString from integer %i is %s\n", t, _i32toa(buff, t));
    printf("\nString from integer %i is %s\n", -0, _i32toa(buff, -0));
    printf("\nString from integer %i is %s\n", -1, _i32toa(buff, -1));
    printf("\nString from integer %i is %s\n", LONG_MIN, _i32toa(buff, LONG_MIN));

    start = clock();
    for (int i = LONG_MIN; i < LONG_MAX; i++) {
        if (i != atoi(_i32toa(buff, (int32_t)i))) {
            printf("\nError for %i", i);
        }
        if (!i) printf("\nAt zero");
    }
    printf("\nElapsed time was %f milliseconds", (double)clock() - (double)(start));

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Performance is 2-4X that of the not-part-of-the-C-standard _itoa() in Visual Studio 2013, and 10-15X that of sprintf().

The approach is somewhat novel, and depends on knowing the required buffer size for the completed string - a problem the function allocating it's own string buffer, buff[] solves, making it thread-safe at the same time.

Knowing where the end of the buffer is allows the characters of the string to be written from the back to the front, solving the reverse order problem. The calling function doesn't need to prepare *rtn in any way, as the working string that gets memcpy()ed to *ptr is already null-terminated.

TVMIA for your feedback. The lack of a good _atoi() function is a persistent enough problem it deserves a good solution. Let's make one.

PS: On my i7 Hazwell box running MSVS C++ 64-bit with full optimizations, the full loop from LONG_MIN to LONG_MAX averages 116 clocks per conversion, for the round-trip, and only 28 clocks for _itoa(). That's over 725 megabytes per second of string - if comparing to Ben Voigt's code. I think I won Ben!

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  • 1
    Even faster ideas here on the C++ version of your question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4351371/…
    – Ben Voigt
    Feb 1 '14 at 18:26
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    @KarolyHorvath: Of course it is, every invocation of the function has its own automatic buff variable.
    – Ben Voigt
    Feb 1 '14 at 18:36
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    I would make them pass you the length of the buffer so you can check you are not overflowing the buffer. Also I would just return a pointer into the buffer instead of doing the memcpy(). Feb 1 '14 at 18:47
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    @brianbeuning buff doesn't survive the function, so that's a NO-GO. I considered the length check, but that's really a decision the calling function should make, as we wouldn't want to saddle _i32toa() with that chore where it isn't needed. Also, if they've screwed up allocating the appropriate storage, why believe they will get the length right? I did consider it at length though, and having the source, you could certainly add it where desired.
    – user1899861
    Feb 1 '14 at 18:54
  • 2
    Use '0' instead of 48, as it reads better and gives the reader more information about what you are doing. Feb 1 '14 at 19:04
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You can eliminate the memcpy by writing directly into the caller's memory area.
You should have the caller pass the size of the buffer.

The other bottleneck is division, but I don't see how to get around that.

Edit 1: correct initialization of buffer pointer

char * _i32toa(char *const rtn, unsigned int buff_size, int32_t i)  
{
    if (NULL == rtn) return NULL;

    uint32_t  ut, ui;
    char minus_sign=0;
    char *p = rtn + buff_size - 1;
    // As before, without memcpy.
    return rtn;
}
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    The auto buff[] and memcpy() allowed me to write to the back of the buff knowing in almost all cases p != buff[] at the end of the function. I adjust for the partially used buffer having a gap between the 1st byte of the string and the front of the buffer by memcpy()-ing the auto buff[] into the correct position in the caller's string buffer. It's either that or you have to know how many bytes you'll need before you start writing the string.
    – user1899861
    Feb 1 '14 at 19:26
  • If the caller passes the size of the buffer, you know where the back is and you start from there. Feb 1 '14 at 19:30
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    That tells you where the back of his potentially very long buffer is, but it doesn't tell you where to start writing chars in that buffer in reverse order so you will end up writing the most significant digit at the head of his buffer.
    – user1899861
    Feb 1 '14 at 19:34
  • See my Edit 1 where I show the initialization of p. Feb 1 '14 at 19:34
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    That would only work if buff_size were the eventual strlen(buff[]).
    – user1899861
    Feb 1 '14 at 19:37
1

Get rid of the auto char array and make them pass the size so you can check for overflow.

#define I32TOA( buff, val ) _i32toa( (buff), sizeof(buff), (val) )

char * _i32toa(char *const rtn, size_t size, int32_t i)    {
    if (NULL == rtn) return NULL;

    uint32_t  ut, ui;
    char minus_sign=0;
    char *p = rtn + size-1;
    *p-- = 0;    // nul-terminate buffer
    assert( p >= rtn );

    if (i < 0)    {
        minus_sign = '-';
        ui = (uint32_t)((int)-1 * (int)i);
    }    else    {
        ui = i;
    }

    while (ui > 9) {
        ut = ui;
        ui /= 10;
        *p-- = (ut - (ui * 10)) + 48;
        assert( p >= rtn );
    }
    *p = ui + 48;

    if ('-' == minus_sign) {
        *--p = minus_sign;
        assert( p >= rtn );
    }

    return p;
}
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    Assume he allocated a buffer in the calling function, and a pointer to it, like char foo[], *p=foo; if he passes p as the arg, the pointer he gets back is no longer equal to p, or &foo[0]; This approach would create the same problem that forces you to always update any pointer passed to realloc(), IE: the pointer value has changed.
    – user1899861
    Feb 1 '14 at 19:44
  • Then why bother returning a pointer at all? Feb 1 '14 at 21:30
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    The returned pointer tells the user where the string you built is located in his buffer. BTW, your macro to check the size of the buffer is getting the size of a pointer, not the size of the buffer, except in the special cases where the buffer is a buffer of fixed size declared in the same scope as the calling function. I changed my code to call malloc() to help illustrate this point.
    – user1899861
    Feb 2 '14 at 20:48