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I am trying to run some unit tests in a C# Windows Forms application (Visual Studio 2005), and I get the following error:

System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 'Utility, Version=1.2.0.200, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=764d581291d764f7' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)**

at x.Foo.FooGO()

at x.Foo.Foo2(String groupName_) in Foo.cs:line 123

at x.Foo.UnitTests.FooTests.TestFoo() in FooTests.cs:line 98**

System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 'Utility, Version=1.2.0.203, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=764d581291d764f7' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)

I look in my references, and I only have a reference to Utility version 1.2.0.203 (the other one is old).

Any suggestions on how I figure out what is trying to reference this old version of this DLL file?

Besides, I don't think I even have this old assembly on my hard drive. Is there any tool to search for this old versioned assembly?

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  • In my case, this happened because I had two projects loading the same DLL with different versions. (hope this helps someone!)
    – miguelmpn
    Apr 15 '20 at 17:22

58 Answers 58

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In my case the problem was between the chair and the keyboard :-)

Could not load file or assembly 'DotNetOpenAuth.Core, Version=4.0.0.0,
Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=2780ccd10d57b246' or one of its dependencies.
The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference.
(Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)

Two or more different assemblies wanted to use a different version of the DotNetOpenAuth library, and that would not be a problem. Furthermore, on my local computer a web.config was automatically updated by NuGet:

<dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="DotNetOpenAuth.AspNet" publicKeyToken="2780ccd10d57b246" culture="neutral" />
        <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.3.0.0" newVersion="4.3.0.0" />
    </dependentAssembly>
    <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity name="DotNetOpenAuth.Core" publicKeyToken="2780ccd10d57b246" culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.3.0.0" newVersion="4.3.0.0" />
</dependentAssembly>

Then I realized that I had forgot to copy/deploy the new web.config to the production server. So if you have manual way of deploying web.config, check it is updated. If you have completely different web.config for production server, you have to merge these dependentAssembly section in sync after using NuGet.

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If you ever get an error like "The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference" and if you have updated via Project > Manage NuGet Packages and Update tab in VS, the first thing you could do is try installing another version of the package after checking versions from NuGet Gallery page and running the folowing command from Package Manager Console:

PM> Install-Package YourPackageName -Version YourVersionNumber 
//Example
PM> Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.FileProviders.Physical -Version 2.1.0

Although answer is not directly related to the package in question and it was asked way back, it is kind of generic, still relevant and hope it helps someone.

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A general answer to this kind of issue is to use binding redirects as in other answers. However, that's only part of the problem - you need to know the correct version of the assembly file that you're using. Windows properties is not always accurate and nuget is also not always accurate.

The only way to get correct version info is to analyse the file itself. One useful tool is dotPeek. The assembly name listed in dotPeek is always accurate in my experience.

So for example, the correct binding for this file is the following:

<dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="System.ComponentModel.Annotations" publicKeyToken="b03f5f7f11d50a3a" culture="neutral"/>
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.2.1.0" newVersion="4.2.1.0"/>
</dependentAssembly>

Windows explorer says the file is 4.6.26515.06, nuget says its a 5.0.0.0 file. dotPeek says it is 4.2.1.0 and that is the version that works correctly in our software. Also note that the public key and culture are important and dotPeek also show this information.

dotPeek vs Windows version information

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  • !!!!!!!!!!This worked instantly : Note that the binding for me that worked was related to the oldVersion -> newVersion. My assembly manifest pointed to the old version, but was never redirected to the new version of the assembly after upgrading to a later of the same DLL. Apr 21 at 5:27
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I had the same error but in my case I was running a custom nuget package locally into another project.

What fixed it for me was changing the package version to the version requested in the error.

The package was in netstandard 2.1 and the project requesting the package was in netcore 3.1

enter image description here

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I received this error message due to referencing an assembly that had the same name as the assembly I was building.

This compiled but it overwrote the referenced assembly with the current projects assembly - thus causing the error.

To fix it I changed the name of the project, and the assembly properties available through right-clicking on the project and choosing 'Properties'.

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In your AssemblyVersion in AssemblyInfo.cs file, use a fixed version number instead of specifying *. The * will change the version number on each compilation. That was the issue for this exception in my case.

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I ran into this issue while using an internal package repository. I had added the main package to the internal repository, but not the dependencies of the package. Make sure you add all dependencies, dependencies of dependencies, recursive etc to your internal repository as well.

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I had the same issue today which prevented me from performing Add-Migration after I made changes in Entity Framework.

I had two projects in my solution, let's call them "Client" and "Data" - a class library project which held my EF models and context. The Client referenced the Data project.

I had signed both projects, and then later made changes to an EF model. After I removed the signature I were able to add the migrations, and could then signed the project anew.

I hope this can be useful for someone, sparing them of prolonged frustration..

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This can also occur if you are using both AssemblyInfo.cs with the AssemblyVersion tags and your .csproj file has with a different value. By either matching the AssemblyInfo or removing the section all together the problem goes away.

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OK, one more answer. I previously created my app as 64 bit and changed the output path (Project/Properties/Build/Output/Output Path) accordingly. Recently I changed the app to 32 Bit (x86), creating a new output path. I created a shortcut to where I thought the compiled .exe was going. No matter what I changed about the source, it got the manifest not matching error. After about an hour of frustration, I happened to check the date/time of the .exe file, saw it was old obviously referencing old .dll's. I was compiling the app into the old directory and my shortcut was referencing the newer. Changed the output path to where the .exe should go, ran the shortcut and error is gone. (slaps forehead)

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I had this problem after starting to use InstallShield. Even though the build order showed the installation project to be last it was building out of order.

I corrected this by making every other project dependent upon it - this forced the installation to build last and thereby removed my assembly mismatching. I hope this helps.

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I had a similar problem when attempting to update one DLL file of my web-site.

This error was occurring, when I simply copied this DLL file into bin folder over FTP.

I resolved this problem by:

  1. stopping the web-site;
  2. copying needed DLL file/DLL files;
  3. starting the web-site
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I faced the same problem while running my unit testcases.

The error clearly states the problem is: when we try to load assembly, the .NET assembly loader tries to load its referred assemblies based on its manifest data (referred assembly name, public key token, version).

To check manifest data:

  1. Open the Visual Studio command prompt,
  2. Type 'ildasm' and drag the required assembly to the ILDASM window and open MANIFEST view. Sometimes MANIFEST contains one assembly with two versions old version as well as new version(like Utility, Version=1.2.0.200 and Utility, Version=1.2.0.203). In reality, the referred assembly is Utility, Version=1.2.0.203(new version), but since the manifest contains even Utility, Version=1.2.0.200(old version), .NET assembly loader tries to find out this versioned DLL file, fails to find and so throws exception.

To solve this, just drag each of the project dependent assemblies to the ILDASM window separately and check which dependent assembly holds the manifest data with the old assembly version. Just rebuild this dependent assembly and refer it back to your project.

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  • Unfortunately, I can't drag the assembly to ildasm since the error prevents the assembly from being built...
    – Number8
    Apr 11 '13 at 11:07
  • This sounds promising but I don't understand how to fix it. I have located a project in my solution that has two versions System.Web.Mvc. When I rebuild it, it still contains two versions. How can I get rid of the reference to the old version? Jul 14 '13 at 5:18
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The problem with me was that there were old dll's dployed that were deleted in a new build. To fix it, I just checked the box to remove additional files at destination when publishing. Remove additional files at destination

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Had similar issue mentioned at this post "Any suggestions on how I figure out what is trying to reference this old version of this DLL file?"

Needed which assembly still refers old ODATA client 6.15.0 , the ildasm helped to narrow down for me (without base code access, only via deployed pkg at server).

Screen shot below for quick summary.

DeveloperPackge if don't have ildasm.exe https://www.microsoft.com/net/download/visual-studio-sdks

ildasm usage to resolve assembly mismatch issue

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This same error was surfacing for me in my Unit Tests project and resulting in some failing tests. I double-checked which version of the assembly I was using in assembly explorer and checked the contents of the runtime/dependentassembly tags and realized a different version of the assembly I had been using was still being referenced there. Because this was the only directive in my tests project app.config I just tried deleting the entire app.config file, rebuilding the solution, and that did the trick! No more reference errors for me :)

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I was getting:

Could not load file or assembly 'XXX-new' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)

It was because I changed the name of the assembly from XXX.dll to XXX-new.dll. Reverting name back to the original fixed the error.

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check the licenses.licx in properties of project you will find the wrong version there.... it worked for me in active report refrences

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Happened to me for System.ValueTuple

Unexpected Error Could not load file or assembly 'System.ValueTuple, Version=4.0.1.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=cc7b13ffcd2ddd51' or one of its dependencies. The system cannot find the file specified.

Solved it by installing .NET Framework 4.7.2 Runtime on the machine the error occurred on. Simple and no need to add bindingRedirect, modifying GAC or downgrading NuGet packages etc.

https://dotnet.microsoft.com/download/dotnet-framework/net472

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I had similar problem but no answer worked for me.

The solution that worked for me was removing publicKeyToken part from project file(YourProject.csproj) manually.

Previously it had been:

<Reference Include="Utility, Version=0.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=e71b9933bfee3534, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
  <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
  <HintPath>dlls\Utility.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>

After change it was:

<Reference Include="Utility, Version=1.0.1.100, Culture=neutral, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
  <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
  <HintPath>dlls\Utility.dll</HintPath>
</Reference>

Be sure that SpecificVersion is False.

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Solved my issue like this with brute force.

I realised I hand multiple copies of the DLL all over the solution and two different versions.

Went into the solution in explorer, searched for the offending DLL and deleted all of them. Then added the references to the DLL back using the one version of the DLL.

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I got stumped with this for a while. I could build and run in release, couldn't in debug due to a reference that didn't match match the manifest. I must have checked the references a hundred times, and deleted all dll's. I noticed that the generated manifest in debug and release were different.

I deleted the app.manifest in my project/properties and it fixed the problem. This didn't include mention of the offending referenced dll's - so I don't know why this was causing a problem.

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Try removing the assembly refernce from your webConfig/appConfig

 <dependentAssembly>
        <assemblyIdentity name="System.IO" publicKeyToken="B03F5F7F11D50A3A" culture="neutral" />
        <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.1.2.0" newVersion="4.3.0.0" />
      </dependentAssembly>
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Is possible you have a wrong nugget versions in assemblyBinding try:

  1. Remove all assembly binding content in web.config / app.config:
<assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
  <dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Abstractions" publicKeyToken="adb9793829ddae60" culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-3.1.3.0" newVersion="3.1.3.0" />
  </dependentAssembly>
  <dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection" publicKeyToken="adb9793829ddae60" culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-3.1.3.0" newVersion="3.1.3.0" />
  </dependentAssembly>
  <dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="System.ComponentModel.Annotations" publicKeyToken="b03f5f7f11d50a3a" culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-4.2.1.0" newVersion="4.2.1.0" />
  </dependentAssembly>
</assemblyBinding>
  1. Type in Package Manager Console: Add-BindingRedirect
  2. All necessary binding redirects are generated
  3. Run your application and see if it works properly. If not, add any missing binding redirects that the package console missed.
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Running the migrator to upgrade from using packages.config to PackageReference painlessly fixed this error for me. If you're running Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.7 or later, you can upgrade by following the steps below.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/nuget/consume-packages/migrate-packages-config-to-package-reference#migration-steps

Here are the steps (copied from the above link):

  1. Open a solution containing project using packages.config.

  2. In Solution Explorer, right-click on the References node or the packages.config file and select Migrate packages.config to PackageReference....

  3. The migrator analyzes the project's NuGet package references and attempts to categorize them into Top-level dependencies (NuGet packages that you installed directly) and Transitive dependencies (packages that were installed as dependencies of top-level packages).

Note: PackageReference supports transitive package restore and resolves dependencies dynamically, meaning that transitive dependencies need not be installed explicitly.

  1. (Optional) You may choose to treat a NuGet package classified as a transitive dependency as a top-level dependency by selecting the Top-Level option for the package. This option is automatically set for packages containing assets that do not flow transitively (those in the build, buildCrossTargeting, contentFiles, or analyzers folders) and those marked as a development dependency (developmentDependency = "true").

  2. Review any package compatibility issues.

  3. Select OK to begin the migration.

  4. At the end of the migration, Visual Studio provides a report with a path to the backup, the list of installed packages (top-level dependencies), a list of packages referenced as transitive dependencies, and a list of compatibility issues identified at the start of migration. The report is saved to the backup folder.

  5. Validate that the solution builds and runs. If you encounter problems, file an issue on GitHub.

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Please run the code in Visual Studio debugger. Please run till you get the exception. There will be Visual Studio Exception UI. Please read the "full details" /"Show details" at the bottom of Visual Studio Exception. In Full details/Show details, it told me that one of my project (which was referring to my main project has a different version of Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory). In my case, my unit test project was calling my project. My unit test project and my project has a different version of Microsoft.IdentityModel.Clients.ActiveDirectory. I am getting run time error when my unit test were executing.

I just updated the version of my unit test project with the same version of main project. It worked for me.

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  • What is "Full details"?
    – Shay
    Oct 16 '19 at 16:22
  • Please start debugging in Visual Studio. Visual Studio will throw an exception on reaching the piece of code. Please see "Show details" in the Visual Studio's Exception UI at the bottom. I also edited my answer with more details.
    – Vikrant
    Dec 5 '19 at 18:36
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Try adding whatever's missing to the global assembly cache.

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  • Actually, I don't get the downvotes. When a reference is missing, sometimes adding it to the GAC actually IS the answer, ASSUMING that is where the reference is pointed. I agree this answer could've been phrased as a direct response to the author's question, a link on how to get it in the GAC, but let's not penalize for a general answer -- especially with the other branching on here, already. I see SO as a bunch of possible answers to the error type, not just the specific scenario. And they don't have over 50 rep, so they can't add a comment to the question or posts (which IMHO should change).
    – vapcguy
    Aug 7 '14 at 2:42
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Right click the reference in VS set "Specific Version" property to True.

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