enter image description here

Here's the code I'm using to achieve the above layout:

.header {
  height: 50px;
}

.body {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50px;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  display: flex;
}

.sidebar {
  width: 140px;
}

.main {
  flex: 1;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

.content {
  flex: 1;
  display: flex;
}

.column {
  padding: 20px;
  border-right: 1px solid #999;
}
<div class="header">Main header</div>
<div class="body">
  <div class="sidebar">Sidebar</div>

  <div class="main">
    <div class="page-header">Page Header. Content columns are below.</div>
    <div class="content">
      <div class="column">Column 1</div>
      <div class="column">Column 1</div>
      <div class="column">Column 1</div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

I omitted the code used for styling. You can see all of it in the pen.


The above works, but when the content area's content overflows, it makes the whole page scroll. I only want the content area itself to scroll, so I added overflow: auto to the content div.

The problem with this now is that the columns themselves don't extend beyond their parents height, so the borders are cut off there too.

Here's the pen showing the scrolling issue.

How can I set the content area to scroll independently, while still having its children extend beyond the content box's height?

up vote 184 down vote accepted

I've spoken to Tab Atkins (author of the flexbox spec) about this, and this is what we came up with:

HTML:

<div class="content">
    <div class="box">
        <div class="column">Column 1</div>
        <div class="column">Column 1</div>
        <div class="column">Column 1</div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.content {
    flex: 1;
    display: flex;
    overflow: auto;
}

.box {
    min-height: min-content; /* needs vendor prefixes */
    display: flex;
}

Here are the pens:

  1. Short columns being stretched.
  2. Longer columns overflowing and scrolling.

The reason this works is because align-items: stretch doesn't shrink its items if they have an intrinsic height, which is accomplished here by min-content.

  • 1
    They work when the parent's height doesn't depend on its children, generally, which is the case here. min-height: 100% does indeed fix your stretch-even-when-columns-are-short issue in Firefox (though not in Chrome). Not sure offhand if that's a Chrome bug or a Firefox bug. – dholbert Feb 5 '14 at 23:36
  • 1
    @dholbert - Tab Atkins helped me with this. I've updated my answer. – Joseph Silber Feb 5 '14 at 23:39
  • 2
    Note that Firefox currently only supports "min-content" for width values, not height values -- so this won't work in Firefox, if that matters to you. (See e.g. bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=852367 ) – dholbert Feb 5 '14 at 23:53
  • 2
    @dholbert - The problem with these pens is that they were public, so anybody could change them. I took ownership of them, so here you go: codepen.io/JosephSilber/pen/pmyHh – Joseph Silber Feb 6 '14 at 0:07
  • 3
    Yes, this is broken in IE11 – Steve May 5 '16 at 12:04

I just solved this problem very elegantly after a lot of trial and error.

Check out my blog post: http://geon.github.io/programming/2016/02/24/flexbox-full-page-web-app-layout

Basically, to make a flexbox cell scrollable, you have to make all its parents overflow: hidden;, or it will just ignore your overflow settings and make the parent larger instead.

  • 4
    This worked in my case as well, but wow, I'd really like to see an explanation of why it works. Most of the time, I find the CSS specs to be totally inscrutable for this kind of thing. – markrian Nov 8 '16 at 18:09
  • Any specific question that wasn't answered in the blog post? – geon Nov 9 '16 at 13:18
  • 1
    From your blog post: "I have no idea why that works, and the specs says nothing either". So, I'm looking for an explanation of why it works. I've skimmed the specs, but as you said, nothing jumps out there. – markrian Nov 10 '16 at 13:45
  • After thinking about it some more, I think it makes sense. The default behaviour is for each div to expand to contain all of it's children, so there won't be any overflow to hide at the leaf nodes. You need to force overflow:hidden all the way from the top of the DOM, so no parent has the chance to accommodate it's children until you are down to the node you want to overflow and scroll. – geon Nov 11 '16 at 9:31
  • 2
    I'm not sure that really explains it. Setting overflow to hidden on an element doesn't stop it from expanding to contain all of its children, AFAIK. According to MDN: "The overflow property specifies whether to clip content, render scrollbars or just display content when it overflows its block level container." Additionally, setting overflow to anything other than visible creates a new block formatting context - but that can't be relevant, because flex containers already create their own block formatting context: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/CSS/…. – markrian Nov 11 '16 at 11:53

A little late but this could help: http://webdesign.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-make-responsive-scrollable-panels-with-flexbox--cms-23269

Basically you need to put html,body to height: 100%; and wrap all your content into a <div class="wrap"> <!-- content --> </div>

CSS:

html, body {
  height: 100%;
}

.wrap {
  height: 100vh;
  display: flex;
}

Worked for me. Hope it helps

Working with position:absolute; along with flex:

Good Luck...

Add this:

align-items: flex-start;

to the rule for .content {}. That fixes it in your pen for me, at least (in both Firefox & Chrome).

By default, .content has "align-items: stretch", which makes it size all of its auto-height children to match its own height, per http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css-flexbox/#algo-stretch. In contrast, the value "flex-start" lets the children compute their own heights, and align themselves at its starting edge (and overflow, and trigger a scrollbar).

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