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I need help because I am not getting the expected output while attempting to read the command line arguments. It is really strange because I copied and pasted the code into a regular console application and it works as expected. It is worth noting that I am running Windows 7 and in visual studio I set the command line argument to be test.png

Win32 Code:

#include "stdafx.h"

using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    //Questions: why doesn't this work (but the one in helloworld does)
    //What are object files? In unix I can execute using ./ but here I need to go to debug in top directory and execute the .exe
    printf("hello\n");
    printf("First argument: %s\n", argv[0]);
    printf("Second argument: %s\n", argv[1]);

    int i;
    scanf("%d", &i);

    return 0;
}

Output:

hello
First Argument: C
Second Argument: t

I tried creating a simple console application and it works:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(int arg, char* argv[])
{
    printf("hello\n");
    printf("First argument: %s\n", argv[0]);
    printf("Second argument: %s\n", argv[1]);

    int i;
    scanf("%d", &i);

    return 0;
}

Output:

hello
First Argument: path/to/hello_world.exe
Second Argument: test.png

Does anyone have any idea what is going on?

  • 3
    At a guess I would say you have a Unicode build but are trying to print the strings as if they are Ansi. – Jonathan Potter Feb 3 '14 at 2:56
  • @JonathanPotter How does that happen and still link? Or is that the issue in the first place (doesn't build)? I agree with you, i just don't see how it even builds. odd. – WhozCraig Feb 3 '14 at 2:58
  • @WhozCraig: Me either, although there's no guarantee the code shown here is actually the code being compiled. – Jonathan Potter Feb 3 '14 at 3:00
  • It is being compiled...I didn't do anything major. These are the templates provided by visual studio 2013. I literally just wrote the printf inside. – user2316667 Feb 3 '14 at 3:00
  • @JonathanPotter as usual, excellent point. – WhozCraig Feb 3 '14 at 3:00
3

_tmain is just a macro that changes depending on whether you compile with Unicode or ASCII, if it is ASCII then it will place main and if it is Unicode then it will place wmain

If you want the correct Unicode declaration that accepts command line arguments in Unicode then you must declare it to accept a Unicode string like this:

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t* argv[]);

You can read more about it here

Another issue with your code is that printf expects an ASCII C Style string and not a Unicode. Either use wprintf or use std::wcout to print a Unicode style string.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t* argv[])
{
    //Questions: why doesn't this work (but the one in helloworld does)
    //What are object files? In unix I can execute using ./ but here I need to go to debug in top directory and execute the .exe
    std::cout << "Hello\n";
    std::wcout << "First argument: " << argv[0] << "\n";
    std::wcout << "Second argument: " << argv[1] << "\n";

    return 0;
}
  • What is the difference? – user2316667 Feb 3 '14 at 3:02
  • @user2316667 Edited – Caesar Feb 3 '14 at 3:06
  • I changed the main function to the one you described but I still only get the first letter. Great link though. – user2316667 Feb 3 '14 at 3:13
  • @user2316667 Check your settings that you are compiling it using Unicode. If using Visual Studio then right click the project, properties and in the General tab make sure Character Set is set to Use Unicode Character set. – Caesar Feb 3 '14 at 3:16
  • Yes. It was always set to Use Unicode Character Set. edit Not that I knew - just looked at it. And still the same problem. Note that the function works with main. But I'm really curious about getting it to work with unicode. I mean, it should be working, right? – user2316667 Feb 3 '14 at 3:17

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