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I need to calculate cohen's d to determine the effect size of an experiment. Is there any implementation in a sound library I could use? If not, what would be a good implementation?

  • 2
    I find it curious that you asked a question and answered it immediately... – That1Guy Feb 3 '14 at 16:45
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    I do that on a regular basis and it's OK. I have found an answer myself but I suspect others may be able to provide better ones. So let the votes determine which one that is. – Bengt Feb 3 '14 at 17:50
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The above implementation is correct in the special case that the two groups have equal size. A more general solution based on the formulas found at Wikipedia and in Robert Coe's article is the 2nd method shown below. Be aware that the denominator is the pooled standard deviation which is generally only appropriate if the population standard deviation is equal for both groups:

from numpy import std, mean, sqrt

#correct if the population S.D. is expected to be equal for the two groups.
def cohen_d(x,y):
    nx = len(x)
    ny = len(y)
    dof = nx + ny - 2
    return (mean(x) - mean(y)) / sqrt(((nx-1)*std(x, ddof=1) ** 2 + (ny-1)*std(y, ddof=1) ** 2) / dof)

#dummy data
x = [2,4,7,3,7,35,8,9]
y = [i*2 for i in x]
# extra element so that two group sizes are not equal.
x.append(10)

#correct only if nx=ny
d = (mean(x) - mean(y)) / sqrt((std(x, ddof=1) ** 2 + std(y, ddof=1) ** 2) / 2.0)
print ("d by the 1st method = " + str(d))
if (len(x) != len(y)):
    print("The first method is incorrect because nx is not equal to ny.")

#correct for more general case including nx !=ny
print ("d by the more general 2nd method = " + str(cohen_d(x,y)))

Output will be:

d by the 1st method = -0.559662109472 The first method is incorrect because nx is not equal to ny. d by the more general 2nd method = -0.572015604666

| improve this answer | |
  • It appears to me that ztest_ind from statsmodels could also be used but I have no experience with it. – skynaut Oct 7 '15 at 21:24
  • I think this is an important contribution - however, in this example, the first and the second method should yield the same result, right? – Lisa Feb 29 '16 at 11:45
  • No, because nx = 9 and ny=8. Note the x.append(10) line. – skynaut Apr 27 '16 at 0:45
  • @skynaut its a quite old post but, I have a small question. How the formula should be updated if the standart deviations are not same ? And also, by same do you mean exactly the same or similar ? – zwlayer Nov 30 '18 at 12:05
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Since Python3.4, you can use the statistics module for calculating spread and average metrics. With that, Cohen's d can be calculated easily:

from statistics import mean, stdev
from math import sqrt

# test conditions
c0 = [2, 4, 7, 3, 7, 35, 8, 9]
c1 = [i * 2 for i in c0]

cohens_d = (mean(c0) - mean(c1)) / (sqrt((stdev(c0) ** 2 + stdev(c1) ** 2) / 2))

print(cohens_d)

Output:

-0.5567679522645598

So we observe a medium effect.

| improve this answer | |
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In Python 2.7, you can use numpy with a couple of caveats, as I discovered while adapting Bengt's answer from Python 3.4.

  1. Ensure division always returns float with: from __future__ import division
  2. Specify the division argument on the variance with ddof=1 into the std function , i.e. numpy.std(c0, ddof=1). numpy's standard deviation default behaviour is to divide by n, whereas with ddof=1 it will divide by n-1.

Code

from __future__ import division #Ensure division returns float
from numpy import mean, std # version >= 1.7.1 && <= 1.9.1
from math import sqrt
import sys


def cohen_d(x,y):
        return (mean(x) - mean(y)) / sqrt((std(x, ddof=1) ** 2 + std(y, ddof=1) ** 2) / 2.0)

if __name__ == "__main__":                
        # test conditions
        c0 = [2, 4, 7, 3, 7, 35, 8, 9]
        c1 = [i * 2 for i in c0]
        print(cohen_d(c0,c1))

Output will then be:

-0.556767952265
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the backport! Why do you require numpy to be no younger than 1.9.1? – Bengt Nov 8 '14 at 11:16
  • @Bengt Simply that the std function exists with the ddof argument and the requirement to override the default value with '-1' in versions 1.7.1 and the current 1.9.1. – pds Nov 24 '14 at 12:07
  • So you are just being careful to require a version you know will work and there is no concrete reason to assume a later version will break this behavior. – Bengt Nov 24 '14 at 15:40

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