36

I have following classes and DbContext:

public class Order:BaseEntity
{
   public Number {get; set;}
}
Product:BaseEntity;
{
  public Name {get; set;} 
}

public class Context : DbContext
{
    ....
    public DbSet<Order> Orders { set; get; }
    public DbSet<Product> Products { set; get; }
    ....
}   

I have a list of objects that want to add to my context, too, but I don't know how can I find appropriate generic DbSet according each entity type dynamically.

IList<BaseEntity> list = new List<BaseEntity>();
Order o1 = new Order();
o1.Numner = "Ord1";
list.Add(o1);

Product p1 = new Product();
p1.Name = "Pencil";
list.Add(p1);

Context cntx = new Context();  
foreach (BaseEntity entity in list)
{
      cntx.Set<?>().Add(entity);         
}

How can I do that?

55

DbContext has a method called Set, that you can use to get a non-generic DbSet, such as:

var someDbSet = this.Set(typeof(SomeEntity));

So in your case:

foreach (BaseEntity entity in list)
{
      cntx.Set(entity.GetType()).Add(entity);         
}
  • Is there any way to get generic DbSets also? – Masoud Feb 4 '14 at 6:14
  • 10
    I'm not sure how you would plan to use that, given that you only know the base type at compile time, but FYI, there is also a Set<T>() method which returns the DbSet<T>. – Pablo Romeo Feb 4 '14 at 7:03
  • @PabloRomeo You can use it in a way that I'm about to. In a abstract class that expects derived classes to define their type. – Jesse Feb 16 '18 at 4:14
28

The question does not specify EF version and the proposed answer does not work anymore for Entity Framework Core (in EF Core, DbContext does not have a non-generic Set method, at least at the date of this answer).

Yet you can still have a working extension method using Jon Skeet's answer to this question. My code is added below for convenience.

Update: Added the generic function call as well returning IQueryable<T> thanks to the comment from Shaddix.

public static IQueryable Set(this DbContext context, Type T)
{
    // Get the generic type definition
    MethodInfo method = typeof(DbContext).GetMethod(nameof(DbContext.Set), BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

    // Build a method with the specific type argument you're interested in
    method = method.MakeGenericMethod(T);

    return method.Invoke(context, null) as IQueryable;
}

public static IQueryable<T> Set<T>(this DbContext context)
{
    // Get the generic type definition 
    MethodInfo method = typeof(DbContext).GetMethod(nameof(DbContext.Set), BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

    // Build a method with the specific type argument you're interested in 
    method = method.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(T)); 

    return method.Invoke(context, null) as IQueryable<T>;
} 
  • 1
    Or if you want to have IQueryable<T>: public static IQueryable<T> Set<T>(this DbContext context) { // Get the generic type definition MethodInfo method = typeof(DbContext).GetMethod(nameof(DbContext.Set), BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance); // Build a method with the specific type argument you're interested in method = method.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(T)); return method.Invoke(context, null) as IQueryable<T>; } – Shaddix Dec 6 '17 at 7:27
  • 7
    But this returns an IQueryable and not the DbSet which is needed to add to the context. – Miles Apr 25 '19 at 17:23
  • 4
    Second method is out of scope as original Set method is already generic typed. Also,original Set method returns a DbSet<T> object. I did not understand how these extensions could be made of use. – ibubi Sep 10 '19 at 11:49
  • For me this was useful, as all of my Entitys are implementing same interface, and I can then cast IQueryable to IQueryable<Interface>. – user3777939 Dec 11 '19 at 7:47
  • I am using EF Core 5 and the "Set" method is present – fededim Nov 25 '20 at 17:16
3

Unfortunately, the below proposed version does not work since .NET Core 3.0. You still can get an IQueryable back, but you cannot cast it to DbSet anymore.

IQueryable<TEntity> as DbSet<TEntity> => null

What's worse is that starting with EF Core 3.0, the new FromSqlRaw and FromSqlInterpolated methods (which replace FromSql) can only be specified on query roots, i.e. directly on the DbSet<> and not on IQueryable. Attempting to specify them anywhere else will result in a compilation error.

See https://github.com/dotnet/efcore/issues/15704#issuecomment-493230352

  • Is it possible to get DbSets back now in 3.1 or 5.0? – WillC Dec 15 '20 at 18:53
1

To avoid error "System.Reflection.AmbiguousMatchException: 'Ambiguous match found.'" I used version below:

    public static IQueryable Set(this DbContext context, Type T)
    {
        MethodInfo method = typeof(DbContext).GetMethods()
            .Where(p => p.Name == "Set" && p.ContainsGenericParameters).FirstOrDefault();

        // Build a method with the specific type argument you're interested in
        method = method.MakeGenericMethod(T);

        return method.Invoke(context, null) as IQueryable;
    }
-2

In addition to Pablo's answer, you can add a class to your project:

namespace System.Data.Entity
{
    public static class EntityFrameworkExtensions
    {
        public static IEnumerable<object> AsEnumerable(this DbSet set)
        {
            foreach (var entity in set)
            {
                yield return entity;
            }
        }
    }
}

This class adds an extention method AsEnumerable to DbSet instance.

When you want to use it, for example to Count or filter a row:

var someDbSet = this.Set(typeof(SomeEntity));
var count = (from a in someDbSet.AsEnumerable() select a).Count();
  • 4
    Downvoted because I can't see what this does. DbSet is already IQueryable which extends IEnumerable, and converting it to IEnumerable by iterating all elements is not only nonsense, but also not performant. – vincent163 Oct 12 '18 at 5:14

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