27

I'm using the Number.prototype.toLocaleString() function to add commas to whole numbers. Documentation for it can be found here.

I am writing it as follows:

Number(data).ToLocaleString('en');

In Firefox/Chrome the number is displayed like 123,456,789. However, in IE it is displayed like 123,456,789.00.

1. Why is IE adding in the decimal point values?

2. How can I remove the decimal point values?

Rather than creating/using a custom function, I'm really just wondering if there is an option that I can add to ToLocaleString() like en, nodecimal. If that option is not available, I will consider a custom function.

8
  • It really outputs that in Firefox ?
    – adeneo
    Feb 3, 2014 at 20:25
  • 1) that's not valid JS. 2) toLocaleString is "implementation-dependent" according to the spec.
    – p.s.w.g
    Feb 3, 2014 at 20:26
  • @adeneo Yep. Using v26
    – neuquen
    Feb 3, 2014 at 20:26
  • @p.s.w.g Woops. Added an extra period. Changed it.
    – neuquen
    Feb 3, 2014 at 20:27
  • 1
    @HarryPehkonen. I understand that I could change my computer settings to achieve the desired affect personally, but my goal is to change it for all end users who come to my website. I have no control over their computer settings.
    – neuquen
    Oct 21, 2015 at 0:49

4 Answers 4

40

How about toLocaleString:

const sum = 1000;

const formatted = sum.toLocaleString("en", {   
    minimumFractionDigits: 0,
    maximumFractionDigits: 0,
});

console.log(formatted);

for:

// 1,000

Or if you're into the money stuff:

const sum = 1000;

const formatted = sum.toLocaleString("en", {
    style: "currency",
    currency: "USD",
    minimumFractionDigits: 0,
    maximumFractionDigits: 0,
});

console.log(formatted);

for:

// $1,000

Replace "en" with one of the supported language tags*. For instance:

'en-US'
// en => a BCP 47 tag that represents a language
// US => a ISO_3166-1 Alpha-2 subtag that represents a country | optional

Replace "USD" with a ISO-4217 currency code. For instance:

'EUR'
// EUR is currency #978 on the active currencies codes list. 
// The result would be a numeric value prefixed by the € sign 

* Further information is available on the BCP 47 and ISO 3166-1 wikis.

2
  • Was minimumFractionDigits and maximumFractionDigits recently introduced? I don't believe that was an option back when I asked the question.
    – neuquen
    Aug 10, 2018 at 16:53
  • @Keven You're probably right. From googling it, it seems that in 2015 it was already available stackoverflow.com/questions/31581011/… so perhaps around a year after you asked
    – Guy
    Aug 11, 2018 at 2:30
12

1) Refer to Andy E's (1) answer.

2) Andy E's solution works on IE 10 and lower but seems to cause the wrong outputs on modern browsers (try it in the console with any number). Here is a safer string manipulation:

Number(data).toLocaleString().split('.')[0];

*Andy I would have added this as a comment to your answer but I don't have enough reputation.

2
  • 5
    This works fine when you know the separator is a dot ("."), what about commas as in French and others? Mar 10, 2015 at 17:45
  • This will not work in certain locales. For example: Number(123534.34).toLocaleString('da-DK',{style:'currency',currency:"DKK"}) which displays as 123.534,34 kr.. Instead you should set the maximumFractionDigits and minimumFractionDigits options to 0, as specified here. For example: Number(123534.34).toLocaleString('da-DK',{style:'currency',currency:"DKK",maximumFractionDigits:0, minimumFractionDigits:0}); which will display 123.534 kr. Jan 16, 2019 at 18:31
11

Which version of IE did you test in? In IE 10 and lower, toLocaleString is based on the ECMAScript specification, which states that the function should be "implementation dependant". In IE 11, it is based on the ECMA Internationalization API, and should be consistent with Firefox 26.

To remove the decimal values in IE 10 and lower (and potentially, other older browsers), you'll have to resort to string manipulation:

Number(data).toLocaleString('en').slice(0, -3);

There's also a polyfill available for this API, which will work for IE 10 and lower. Including it at the moment is a little tricky, since the browser/minified build contains no actual data (because it would be huge). The data is provided separately in JSON or JSONP format, so that you can download the correct data for the user currently browsing your site.

2
  • I'm testing in IE9 and below and need to support IE 10 and below so it looks like I'll need to manipulate then.
    – neuquen
    Feb 3, 2014 at 20:32
  • 2
    This will not work in certain locales. For example: Number(123534.34).toLocaleString('da-DK',{style:'currency',currency:"DKK"}) which displays as 123.534,34 kr.. Instead you should set the maximumFractionDigits and minimumFractionDigits options to 0, as specified here. For example: Number(123534.34).toLocaleString('da-DK',{style:'currency',currency:"DKK",maximumFractionDigits:0, minimumFractionDigits:0}); which will display 123.534 kr. Jan 16, 2019 at 18:29
3

Number(data).toLocaleString().replace(/\D\d\d$/, ''); should cover any locale and browser.

3
  • Great solution. Retains the thousand separator. and doesn't throw a tantrum if a number doesn't contain decimals (in later browsers). Jan 17, 2017 at 10:31
  • This will not work in certain locales. For example: Number(123534.34).toLocaleString('da-DK',{style:'currency',currency:"DKK"}) which displays as 123.534,34 kr.. Instead you should set the maximumFractionDigits and minimumFractionDigits options to 0, as specified here. For example: Number(123534.34).toLocaleString('da-DK',{style:'currency',currency:"DKK",maximumFractionDigits:0, minimumFractionDigits:0}); which will display 123.534 kr. Jan 16, 2019 at 18:32
  • In the OP's question, isn't that what he would want? He's only using whole numbers and IE is adding the .00 - or in your case ",00" Jan 23, 2019 at 12:36

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