6

Background

I am changing my LINQ-to-SQL code in my project to Entity Framework. Most of the change over was relatively simple, however, I have run into a fairly major issue. With LINQ-to-SQL, I was able to load an entire object graph (for Model B) using stored procedures like so:

ViewModel.Model = MyDbContext.usp_ModelA_GetByID(AId).Single();
List<ModelB> Details = 
    (from b in MyDbContext.usp_ModelB_GetByID(BId)
    join c in MyDbContext.usp_ModelC_GetAll()
       on b.CId equals c.CId
    select new ModelB()
    {
        BId = b.BId,
        CId = b.CId,
        C = c
    }).ToList();
ViewModel.Model.ModelBs.AddRange(Details);

However, after converting this code to EF, on the line where ViewModel.Model.ModelBs is accessed, I get the error "EntityCommandExecutionException" with the inner exception explaining that "The SELECT permission was denied on the object 'ModelBTable'." Obviously, EF is attempting to fetch the ModelBs for the ModelA even though I have already loaded them from the database. While I don't fully understand why it's trying to load the entities even though I have added them, I can only assume that because it didn't load them itself, it doesn't believe they are fully loaded and probably views all of the objects I loaded into it as "New".

In an effort to bypass EF attempting to fetch the objects itself, I decided to change my code to:

ViewModel.Model = MyDbContext.usp_ModelA_GetByID(AId).Single();
List<ModelB> Details = 
    (from b in MyDbContext.usp_ModelB_GetByID(BId)
    join c in MyDbContext.usp_ModelC_GetAll()
        on b.CId equals c.CId
     select new ModelB()
     {
        BId = b.BId,
        CId = c.CId,
        C = c
     }).ToList();
ViewModel.Model.ModelBs = new EntityCollection<ModelB>();
foreach (ModelB detail in Details)
{
    ViewModel.Model.ModelBs.Attach(detail);
}

After making this change, I now run into the error "InvalidOperationException" with a message of "The EntityCollection could not be initialized because the relationship manager for the object to which the EntityCollection belongs is already attached to an ObjectContext. The InitializeRelatedCollection method should only be called to initialize a new EntityCollection during deserialization of an object graph.".

This is confusing enough because I am using the same context to load all of the entities so I'm unsure as to why it won't allow me to combine them together. I am able to do this in other ORMs without issue.

After researching this error, I decided to attempt an approach that I hoped would trick EF into thinking that the entire object graph was loaded by the same context so I rewrote my code to be:

ViewModel.Model = 
    (from a in MyDbContext.usp_ModelA_GetByID(AId)
    select new A()
    {
        AId = a.AId,
        ModelBs = (from b in MyDbContext.usp_ModelB_GetByID(BId)
                  join c in MyDbContext.usp_ModelC_GetAll()
                      on b.CId equals c.CId
                  select new ModelB()
                  {
                      BId = b.BId,
                      CId = b.CId,
                      C = c
                  }).ToEntityCollection()
    }).Single();

with ToEntityCollection being an extension method I created like so:

public static EntityCollection<TEntity> ToEntityCollection<TEntity>(
     this IEnumerable<TEntity> source) where TEntity : class, IEntityWithRelationships
{
    EntityCollection<TEntity> set = new EntityCollection<TEntity>();
    foreach (TEntity entity in source)
    {
        set.Attach(entity);
    }
    return set;
}

Now, I get the error "InvalidOperationException" with a message of "Requested operation is not allowed when the owner of this RelatedEnd is null. RelatedEnd objects that were created with the default constructor should only be used as a container during serialization.".

After extensively researching each of these errors, I was still unable to find a solution pertaining to my problem.

Question

So, after all of that, my question is: How do I load an entire object graph when each object has its own stored procedure using Entity Framework 4?

Update

So, based on the answers so far, I feel I need to include the following caveats here:

  1. I am not looking for an answer that uses a single stored procedure to load an entire object graph. I am looking for a way to load an object graph using a get stored procedure per entity. I realize that loading the object graph using a single stored procedure could, theoretically perform much better, but at this time, I am more interested in smaller changes to the code base especially with regards to the way the database is structured.

  2. If your solution requires editing the edmx directly, it will not be an acceptable answer. Since this is an auto-generated file, editing the edmx directly essentially means that those same changes would need to be re-done upon any modification through the designer.

Update 2

So, after some deliberation, I came up with a work around. What I did was change my ViewModel to have a List ModelBs property that pulls the data using the stored procedure joins and in my view, I am just setting this property as the datasource. This is definitely not what I would consider to be an optimal solution because now my ViewModel is acting more like the Model than a ViewModel and I can no longer traverse my ModelA type to get the list of ModelBs, but it works! I still don't understand why I can do:

(from b in MyDbContext.usp_ModelB_GetByID(BId)
join c in MyDbContext.usp_ModelC_GetAll()
    on b.CId equals c.CId
select new ModelB()
{
    BId = b.BId,
    CId = b.CId,
    C = c //<------Setting a navigation property and EF figures out that it belongs
}).ToList();

but I can't do:

(from a in MyDbContext.usp_ModelA_GetByID(AId)
select new ModelA()
{
    AId = a.AId,
    ModelBs = MyDbContext.usp_ModelB_GetByID(BId).ToEntityCollection() //<----Won't let me set the navigation property when the navigation property is a collection.
}).Single();
3

It can be done in a fairly simple way but takes some manual effort. Here is an MSDN post on handling stored procedures with multiple result sets which shows both a code first and database first approach.

Example:

Load EntityB proc:

create proc dbo.Get_EntityB_by_EntityAId( @aId int )
as

select distinct
    b.EntityBId
    , b.Description
from
    EntityA a
    left outer join EntityB b
     on a.PrimaryEntityB_EntityBId = b.EntityBId
    left outer join EntityB b2
     on a.AlternativeEntityB_EntityBId = b2.EntityBId
where
    a.EntityAId = @aId
go

Load EntityA proc (which calls load B proc)

create proc dbo.Get_EntityA_by_Id( @id int )
as

-- use a select statement
select 
    a.EntityAId
    , a.Description
    , a.PrimaryEntityB_EntityBId
    , a.AlternativeEntityB_EntityBId
from
    EntityA a
where
    a.EntityAId = @id

-- and/or other sprocs
exec dbo.Get_EntityB_by_EntityAId @id

go

Entity classes

[Table("EntityA")]
public partial class EntityA
{
    public int EntityAId { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }


    public virtual EntityB PrimaryEntityB { get; set; }

    public virtual EntityB AlternativeEntityB { get; set; }
}


[Table("EntityB")]
public partial class EntityB
{
    public int EntityBId { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    [InverseProperty("PrimaryEntityB")]
    public virtual ICollection<EntityA> EntityAsViaPrimary { get; set; }
    [InverseProperty( "AlternativeEntityB" )]
    public virtual ICollection<EntityA> EntityAsViaAlternative { get; set; }
}

Method that calls sproc and handles results (for this method, you could return the one EntityA if you'd like)

public static void EagerLoadEntityA( int aId )
{
    using( var db = new TestEntities() )
    {
        // if using code first
        db.Database.Initialize( false );

        var cmd = db.Database.Connection.CreateCommand();
        cmd.CommandText = "dbo.Get_EntityA_by_Id";

        db.Database.Connection.Open();

        try
        {
            var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

            var objContext = ( ( IObjectContextAdapter )db ).ObjectContext;

            var aEntities = objContext
                .Translate<EntityA>( reader, "EntityAs", MergeOption.AppendOnly );

            reader.NextResult();

            var bEntities = objContext
                .Translate<EntityB>( reader, "EntityBs", MergeOption.AppendOnly );

        }
        finally
        {
            db.Database.Connection.Close();
        }
    }
}

Usage:

EagerLoadEntityA( 1234 );
var entityA = db.EntityAs.Find( 1234 ); // cached
var primB = entityA.PrimaryEntityB; // this is already loaded
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the post and while yours is a valid solution (loading an entire object graph from a single stored procedure), I am more focused on loading the entire object graph from the set of stored procedures I already have. Can you provide an example of that which would be synonymous to the code examples in my question? Also, editing the auto-generated edmx code is unacceptable. I have been able to accomplish this in other ORMs so it is pretty baffling if I cannot accomplish the same using EF. – Aaron Hawkins Feb 3 '14 at 22:45
  • A single stored procedure could call other stored procedures, each of which could return 1 or more data sets. – Moho Feb 3 '14 at 22:47
  • I realize that what you're saying is true, however, it would mean vast changes across the entire database creating a stored procedure for each object graph I need loaded regardless of whether those stored procedures call the existing ones or not. I am looking for a code-change-only solution and since all I did was switch ORMs, if the ORM is good at being an ORM, I shouldn't have to make database changes to accomodate it. – Aaron Hawkins Feb 3 '14 at 22:55
  • In your posted code, EntityB should have a List<EntityC> C property. Although, I wonder if it would be possible to use your manual approach to load the entire object graph. The only problem is that, using this method, I feel like I might as well just be using plain ADO.NET as the only benefit I would actually be getting from the ORM would be the model code generation which I could do with the good ol' typed dataset. If this is the only way to get it to work, I should choose another ORM or just leave it as Linq-to-SQL. – Aaron Hawkins Feb 3 '14 at 23:10
  • 1
    What you do is up to you, I merely demonstrated it can be done efficiently with EF – Moho Feb 3 '14 at 23:29
1

Okay, so after even further deliberation, I figured out a solution that works for what I am wanting. Since I am in a web environment and have no need to lazily load objects, I turned EnableLazyLoading to false for the entire DbContext. Then, using an EF feature called the magical relationship fix-up, I am able to do the following:

ViewModel.Model = MyDbContext.usp_ModelA_GetByID(AId).Single();
var Details = 
(from b in MyDbContext.usp_ModelB_GetByID(BId)
join c in MyDbContext.usp_ModelC_GetAll()
   on b.CId equals c.CId
select new ModelB()
{
    BId = b.BId,
    CId = b.CId,
    C = c
}).ToList();  
//ToList() executes the proc and projects the plate details into the object 
//graph which never tries to select from the database because LazyLoadingEnabled is
//false.  Then, the magical relationship fix-up allows me to traverse my object graph
//using ViewModel.Model.ModelBs which returns all of the ModelBs loaded into the graph
//that are related to my ModelA.
| improve this answer | |
0

Stored procedures cannot be directly associated with an Entity for the purposes of selecting / reading data. Typically stored procedures that are used for retrieval will return complex types and not entities. In order to interact with the DB indirectly, EF provides the ability to associate an Entity with a View for reads, and stored procedures for Insert, Update, and Delete.

Read this article for a full summary of working with EF and stored procedures. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/gg699321.aspx

| improve this answer | |
  • If this were true, why would EF give you the ability to configure a function import as returns a collection of a specified entity? In addition, the article you referenced says that path towards using stored procedures for everything is completely supported by EF, although it does not provide an example of loading an entire object graph from multiple stored procedures. I realize that using a single stored procedure could be better performance-wise, but at this time, I am concentrating more on maintainability of the code and the conversion I am undertaking. – Aaron Hawkins Feb 3 '14 at 22:43
  • True EF gives you the ability to map a function import return value to a stored procedure, but it will not natively understand that as part of the entity object graph. The way EF natively supports db mapping and full object graph building is either with a mapped table, or a mapped View for reads, and mapped stored procedures for Insert, Update, and Delete. – Aaron Palmer Feb 4 '14 at 1:03
  • This is not saying that there are not other ways to code and arrive at a single object graph fully utilizing stored procedures. I am just saying that this is not natively supported by EF currently. – Aaron Palmer Feb 4 '14 at 1:05
  • This answer gives a good explanation of why EF does not support stored procedures for select functionality of an entity. stackoverflow.com/a/4108651/24908 – Aaron Palmer Feb 4 '14 at 1:10
  • I understand the points in your referenced answer, but I don't understand why it can't treat a stored procedure that returns a list of entities as a projection of that entity and be able to combine several together using a Linq join. Just as I said to moho, I can't imagine not being able to do something so easily accomplished with Linq-to-SQL especially since Microsoft dropped Linq-to-SQL in favor of EF. I tried using MergeOption.NoTracking, but was still unable to trick EF into thinking the entity was loaded even though it wasn't through the IQueryable interface. – Aaron Hawkins Feb 4 '14 at 14:37

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