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Currently I have one pixel buffer and I process the data in it with a single kernel call:

dim3 threadsPerBlock(32, 32)
dim3 blocks(screenWidth / threadsPerBlock.x, screenHeight / threadsPerBlock.y);
kernel<<<blocks, threadsPerBlock>>>();

The pixel buffer contains all the pixels in a window with dimensions screenWidth x screenHeight.

My idea is to divide the window in 2 or 4 parts and to process the pixel data simultaneously.

Can this be done, and if it can - how ?

I've read little about streams but from what I understood two streams cannot work on a single piece of data (e.g. my pixelBuffer), or am I wrong ?

Edit: My graphics card is with compute capability 3.0

Edit 2: I use SDL to do the drawing and I have a single GPU, and I use user defined data array:

main.cu

 Color vfb_linear[VFB_MAX_SIZE * VFB_MAX_SIZE]; // array on the Host
 Color vfb[VFB_MAX_SIZE][VFB_MAX_SIZE] // 2D array used for SDL
 extern "C" void callKernels(Color* dev_vfb);

int main()
{
    Color* dev_vfb; // pixel array used on the GPU
    // allocate memory for dev_vfb on the GPU
    cudaMalloc((void**)&dev_vfb, sizeof(Color) * RES_X * RES_Y);
    // memcpy HostToDevice
    cudaMemcpy(dev_vfb, vfb_linear, sizeof(Color) * RES_X * RES_Y, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    callKernels(dev_vfb); // wrapper function that calls the kernels

    // memcpy DeviceToHost
    cudaMemcpy(vfb_linear, dev_vfb, sizeof(Color) * RES_X * RES_Y, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

    // convert vfb_linear into 2D array so it can be handled by SDL
    convertDeviceToHostBuffer();    

    display(vfb); // render pixels on screen with SDL

}

cudaRenderer.cu

__global__ void kernel(Color* dev_vfb)
{
    int x = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x;
    int y = threadIdx.y + blockIdx.y * blockDim.y;
    int offset = x + y * blockDim.x * gridDim.x;

    if (offset < RES_X * RES_Y)
    {
        dev_vfb[offset] = getColorForPixel();
    }
}

extern "C" callKernels(Color* dev_vfb)
{
    dim3 threadsPerBlock(32, 32)
    dim3 blocks(screenWidth / threadsPerBlock.x, screenHeight / threadsPerBlock.y);
    kernel<<<blocks, threadsPerBlock>>>(dev_vfb);
}

contents of display(vfb):

void display(Color vfb[VFB_MAX_SIZE][VFB_MAX_SIZE])
{
    // screen is pointer to SDL_Surface
    int rs = screen->format->Rshift;
    int gs = screen->format->Gshift;
    int bs = screen->format->Bshift;

    for (int y = 0; y < screen->h; ++y)
    {
        Uint32* row = (Uint32*) ((Uint8*) screen->pixels + y * screen->pitch);
        for (int x = 0; x < screen->w; ++x)
            row[x] = vfb[y][x].toRGB32(rs, gs, bs);
    }
    SDL_Flip(screen);
}

This is a simple example of what I am doing in my project. It is a raytracer and maybe SDL is the worst choice for interop with CUDA but I don't know if I will have time to change it.

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  • 2
    It may be possible. Are you referring to an OpenGL or DX PBO, or just a plain data array that has pixel data in it? The code you've shown is of no value in answering your question. One cannot even gather any idea of what your data array is like from it. It sounds like you have a single GPU. In that case, it's unlikely that you can get better performance by running two simultaneous kernels as opposed to a single well-written kernel. Feb 4, 2014 at 1:28
  • I will add more info in my question.
    – Geto
    Feb 4, 2014 at 10:05
  • I've added more info, and I understand that I might gain no performance from the simultaneous kernels but worth a try if it can be done.
    – Geto
    Feb 4, 2014 at 10:38

1 Answer 1

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There's nothing that prevents two streams from working on the same piece of data in global memory of one device.

As I said in the comments, I don't think this is a sensible approach to make things run faster. However, the modifications to your code would be something like this (coded in browser, not tested):

__global__ void kernel(Color* dev_vfb, int slices)
{
    int x = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x;
    int y = threadIdx.y + blockIdx.y * blockDim.y;
    int offset = x + y * blockDim.x * gridDim.x;

    if (offset < (RES_X * RES_Y/slices)
    {
        dev_vfb[offset] = getColorForPixel();
    }
}

extern "C" callKernels(Color* dev_vfb)
{
    int num_slices=2;
    cudaStream_t streams[num_slices];
    for (int i = 0; i < num_slices; i++)
      cudaStreamCreate(&(streams[i]));
    dim3 threadsPerBlock(32, 32)
    dim3 blocks(screenWidth / threadsPerBlock.x, screenHeight / (num_slices*threadsPerBlock.y));
    for (int i = 0; i < num_slices; i++){
      int off = i * (screenWidth*screenHeight/num_slices);
      kernel<<<blocks, threadsPerBlock, 0, streams[i]>>>(dev_vfb+off, num_slices); }
}
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  • That works and as you said it didn't speed up the program. I will mark it as an answer because this is what I wanted to see how it's done. Do you have any suggestions on how to speed up that particular kernel, or I should look into the guts of my getColorForPixel() function and seek improvement there ?
    – Geto
    Feb 8, 2014 at 9:43
  • Yes, probably the focus should be on getColorForPixel(). Feb 8, 2014 at 14:15

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