2
public class CommonService
{
    private readonly DataContext _context;

    public CommonRepository()
    {
        _context = new DataContext();
    }

    public CommonRepository(DataContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    public List GetAll()
    {
        var query = from m in _context.MyModel
                    select m;
        return m.ToList();
    }
}

or


    public class CommonService
    {
        public List GetAll()
        {
            using (DataContext context = new DataContext())
            {
                var query = from m in context.MyModel
                            select m;
                return m.ToList();
            }
        }
    }

or you have more pattern, suggest me please.

closed as primarily opinion-based by walther, John Saunders, i3arnon, jmoreno, rene Feb 12 '14 at 21:10

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Note that your question is: "Should I use/allow dependency injection in my code that happen to use LINQ?" - answer: yes... Please clarify what kind of advice you are looking for. – Alexei Levenkov Feb 4 '14 at 2:55
  • 1
    @AlexeiLevenkov, that's true, but as you've noted, it's hard to assess without knowing the lifetime behavior of CommonService. If it's in any way a singleton, a permanent data context would be a very bad idea. – Kirk Woll Feb 4 '14 at 2:56
  • There's no best way... – walther Feb 4 '14 at 2:57
  • He doesn't deserve a down vote though. – Ean V Feb 4 '14 at 3:15
  • @walther, are you asserting this as a general rule? Or just in this specific case? Either way, I believe there actually would be a "best" answer here given enough parameters. – Kirk Woll Feb 4 '14 at 3:15
3

There is one major difference here: The first code sample keeps a single DataContext for the lifetime of the service, while the second example spins up a new one for each operation. The second example is usually correct because with Change Tracking, DataContext can get huge and you can accidentially commit stuff you didn't mean to commit if something else calls SubmitChanges().

See Multiple/single instance of Linq to SQL DataContext

  • 1
    Good answer for an ambigious question. It's an important point to stress that retaining a data context for a long time is almost always a very bad idea. – Kirk Woll Feb 4 '14 at 3:14
0

You can use both patterns, but always make sure that the context will have a short lifespan. The first option allows you to create methods in CommonService that need a context, but without having to create one in each and every method. So it prevents repetitive code. Also, it allows IoC containers to inject a context into CommonService by constructor injection.

If you go for the first option (which I'd lean to doing), you may consider making CommonService implement IDisposable, giving it aDispose method in which the context is disposed. This will also encourage you to use the CommonService in a using construct and thus limit its lifespan.

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