0

I'm a c++ noob trouble shooting for 4 hours now. I am getting my first segmentation fault. I think it is coming from the variable data. The program pulls the html (using cURL) from a webpage but seg faults after fetching some HTML. I am calling "curlbar::getThreads();" from main.cpp. The code worked fine when it was all in main.cpp, but when I put it into curlbar, I got the segfault (core dumped) error:

/*
* curlbar.cpp
*
*  Created on: Feb 2, 2014
* 
*/
//get list of threads
#include "headers.h"
class curlbar{
public:
string data;
size_t writeContents(char* buf, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void* up){
        for(unsigned int c = 0; c<size*nmemb; c++){
            this->data.push_back(buf[c]);
        }
        return size*nmemb;
}

static void getThreads(){

    CURL* curl;
    curl_global_init(CURL_GLOBAL_ALL);
    curl = curl_easy_init();

    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, "www.somewebsiteblahblah.com");
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, &curlbar::writeContents);
    curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_VERBOSE,1L); //tell curl to output its progress
    curl_easy_perform(curl);
    curl_easy_cleanup(curl);
    curl_global_cleanup();
}
};

Is the "string data;" not have enough memory allocated to it? How should I go about fixing this?

2

I'm fairly sure this is what you're missing. you can't pass a member function as a callback, as the caller has no clue how to appropriately push this as the first parameter.

But you can do this:

class curlbar
{
private:
    // callback version used for curl-write-function
    static size_t writeContents_s(char *buf, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *up)
    {
        curlbar* pThis = static_cast<curlbar*>(up);
        return pThis->writeContents(buf, size, nmemb);
    }

public:
    std::string data;

    // member version
    size_t writeContents(char* buf, size_t size, size_t nmemb)
    {
        std::copy(buf, buf+(size*nmemb), std::back_inserter(data));
        return size*nmemb;
    }

    void getThreads()
    {
        CURL* curl;
        curl_global_init(CURL_GLOBAL_ALL);
        curl = curl_easy_init();

        curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_URL, "www.somewebsiteblahblah.com");
        curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEFUNCTION, &curlbar::writeContents_s);
        curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_WRITEDATA, this); // NOTE ADDITION
        curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_VERBOSE,1L); //tell curl to output its progress
        curl_easy_perform(curl);
        curl_easy_cleanup(curl);
        curl_global_cleanup();
    }
};

Given a curlbar obj; object, you invoke it as

curlbar obj;
obj.getThreads();

How It Works

This uses the user-defined data parameter option of an easy-curl handle to establish the piece-o-data that will be send back along with your static writer-callback. That data is provided as the void *up parameter to the callback. So we pass the pointer this and in the static callback use a static_cast to give us an object pointer, pThis. We use that pointer to fire the member function of a similar name, but no longer needing the up param.

  • I found it easier to re-write the callback function to write to a file using fwrite()... I re-wrote a lot of the part. I did try your solution and it did compile (but I forget why I didn't use it, it's been a week). Thank you! (Also, Valgrind is great for finding seg-faults) – PSeUdocode Feb 12 '14 at 16:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.