8

Consider this code:

class Foo:
  def geta(self):
    self.a = 'lie'
    return 'this is {self.a}'.format(?)

What should I write instead of the question mark so that the string will be formatted correctly?

2
  • 1
    'this is {}'.format (self.a) – Hyperboreus Feb 4 '14 at 13:29
  • ok, but assume I would like to have the variable name inside my string? – whomaniac Feb 4 '14 at 13:30
15

What you probably are looking for is

'this is {0.a}'.format(self)
'this is {.a}'.format(self)
'this is {o.a}'.format(o=self)
'this is {self.a}'.format(self=self)

Note, however, that you are missing at least a method in your class.

Directly under the class scope there is no such thing as self.

2
  • It is best to explicitly address the referenced object with {0.a} or similar. {.a} works only once. It fails otherwise like in: "'this is {.a}, i repeat myself {.a}'.format(self)'". – tssch Jun 30 '15 at 15:28
  • @tssch But if you do this is {.a}, i repeat myself {.a}'.format(self, self), it works. The first self is for the first {.a}, the second one for the second one. As documented. – glglgl Jun 30 '15 at 17:06
4

The reference you include inside the brackets refers to either a number indicating the index of the argument passed to format, or a name directing to a named argument in the format call. Like that:

class Foo:
  def geta(self):
    self.a = 'lie'
    return 'this is {self.a}'.format(self=self)
2
  • 3
    This is the correct answer; just fix your code example to actually include a method definition, as OP's example is broken. – lanzz Feb 4 '14 at 13:32
  • 1
    hmm, what about using something like format(self.__dict__) or something along those lines so one could easily format with all class members? – whomaniac Feb 4 '14 at 13:37

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