744

Could anyone let me know how to remove a class on an element using JavaScript only? Please do not give me an answer with jQuery as I can't use it, and I don't know anything about it.

4
  • 1
    Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/195951/… This answer has some good examples. Patrick.
    – Patrick
    Jan 28, 2010 at 15:47
  • I would suggest that you check jQuery source and its method removeClass.
    – eomeroff
    Jan 31, 2014 at 15:57
  • 3
    document.getElementById("theID").removeAttribute("class")
    – Alan Wells
    Jan 4, 2016 at 18:31
  • 8
    @SandyGood That will remove ALL classes. Mar 17, 2016 at 3:29

11 Answers 11

1135

The right and standard way to do it is using classList. It is now widely supported in the latest version of most modern browsers:

ELEMENT.classList.remove("CLASS_NAME");

remove.onclick = () => {
  const el = document.querySelector('#el');
  el.classList.remove("red");
}
.red {
  background: red
}
<div id='el' class="red"> Test</div>
<button id='remove'>Remove Class</button>

Documentation: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.classList

16
  • 2
    FWIW, this works for me on FF 7.0.1, and Chromium 16.0.910.0
    – SW.
    Oct 19, 2011 at 1:38
  • 6
    Very nice! That is so much simpler than regular expressions and splitting className into parts and manually traversing them. Feb 12, 2013 at 23:16
  • 25
    @dzhioev - I believe because it is relatively new and not supported in older browsers (IE support starts at IE10) Apr 5, 2013 at 13:58
  • 11
    On the MDN page there is a shim provided for older browsers.
    – oxygen
    Jun 7, 2013 at 16:52
  • 4
    ELEMENT.classList has both 'add' and 'remove', btw.
    – Kamilius
    Oct 30, 2014 at 11:57
532
document.getElementById("MyID").className =
    document.getElementById("MyID").className.replace(/\bMyClass\b/,'');

where MyID is the ID of the element and MyClass is the name of the class you wish to remove.


UPDATE: To support class names containing dash character, such as "My-Class", use

document.getElementById("MyID").className =
  document.getElementById("MyID").className
    .replace(new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)'+ 'My-Class' + '(?:\\s|$)'), ' ');
12
  • 13
    Correct me if I'm wrong but I think that your 1st argument on replace must be a regex, so without enclosing it in quotes: .replace(/\bMyClass\b/,''). But then 'MyClass' must to be a literal, otherwise maybe creating the regex dinamically could work: .replace(new RegExp('\\b' + myClass + '\\b'),'') Jan 8, 2013 at 12:12
  • 3
    @PauFracés Check the edit history. The inconsistency got introduced by someone else.
    – ЯegDwight
    Jan 8, 2013 at 12:20
  • 55
    The use of the word boundary metacharacter \b is not suitable here, because the word boundary occurs also between a word character [A-Za-z0-9_] and the dash - character. Therefore a class name e.g. 'different-MyClass' would also be replaced, resulting in 'different-'. There is a better solution which matches whitespace characters around the class name.
    – Adam
    Jun 3, 2013 at 15:53
  • 2
    I'm also removing a space if its there: domNode.className.replace(new RegExp(" ?\\b"+cssClass+"\\b"),'')
    – B T
    May 15, 2014 at 7:16
  • 1
    ill just copy paste this here since this where google leads me to not the page with right answer linked in Adam comment. function removeClass(e,c) {e.className = e.className.replace( new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)'+c+'(?!\\S)') ,'');} Jun 28, 2015 at 17:25
62

Here's a way to bake this functionality right into all DOM elements:

HTMLElement.prototype.removeClass = function(remove) {
    var newClassName = "";
    var i;
    var classes = this.className.split(" ");
    for(i = 0; i < classes.length; i++) {
        if(classes[i] !== remove) {
            newClassName += classes[i] + " ";
        }
    }
    this.className = newClassName;
}
6
  • 3
    Very elegant and most applicable to the question. Dec 3, 2012 at 15:07
  • 7
    Add an if wrapper [if (typeof HTMLElement.prototype.removeClass !== "function") {] to make this answer most elegant in case browsers add support for removeClass in the future.. Jan 16, 2013 at 14:43
  • @Matthew A logoical programmatic way. Appreciate it. Looks cross-browser too. Is it??? Oct 5, 2013 at 7:17
  • 1
    You can also split classes by \t \n \r and \s+, your split-nonregex doesn't take that into account. Dec 1, 2014 at 21:20
  • 3
    Add a trim() at the end of return to remove redundant spaces when function is used more then once (such as toggling an active/deactivate state).
    – Sam
    Nov 20, 2015 at 21:26
47
div.classList.add("foo");
div.classList.remove("foo");

More at https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/element.classList

2
  • 7
    Nice, too bad supports starts with IE 10 and Android 3. Why they didn't code this stuff 10 years ago?..
    – andreszs
    Aug 2, 2014 at 23:09
  • 2
    @Andrew To be honest the entire world of web technologies looks like a big pile of ideas thrown together without system or consistency...
    – Nearoo
    Feb 5, 2017 at 0:53
44

Try this:

function hasClass(ele, cls) {
  return ele.className.match(new RegExp('(\\s|^)'+cls+'(\\s|$)'));
}
    
function removeClass(ele, cls) {
  if (hasClass(ele,cls)) {
    var reg = new RegExp('(\\s|^)'+cls+'(\\s|$)');
    ele.className=ele.className.replace(reg,' ');
  }
}
3
  • 2
    el.className.replace(/(\s|^)someclass(\s|$)/, ' ') If you aren't feeling like creating a helper function. :)
    – Salman
    Jan 14, 2015 at 7:33
  • Why \\s, and not just \s ? Wondering. Nov 7, 2015 at 9:47
  • 1
    You need to escape the backslash Nov 8, 2015 at 2:51
27

Edit

Okay, complete re-write. It's been a while, I've learned a bit and the comments have helped.

Node.prototype.hasClass = function (className) {
    if (this.classList) {
        return this.classList.contains(className);
    } else {
        return (-1 < this.className.indexOf(className));
    }
};

Node.prototype.addClass = function (className) {
    if (this.classList) {
        this.classList.add(className);
    } else if (!this.hasClass(className)) {
        var classes = this.className.split(" ");
        classes.push(className);
        this.className = classes.join(" ");
    }
    return this;
};

Node.prototype.removeClass = function (className) {
    if (this.classList) {
        this.classList.remove(className);
    } else {
        var classes = this.className.split(" ");
        classes.splice(classes.indexOf(className), 1);
        this.className = classes.join(" ");
    }
    return this;
};


Old Post
I was just working with something like this. Here's a solution I came up with...

// Some browsers don't have a native trim() function
if(!String.prototype.trim) {
    Object.defineProperty(String.prototype,'trim', {
        value: function() {
            return this.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,'');
        },
        writable:false,
        enumerable:false,
        configurable:false
    });
}
// addClass()
// first checks if the class name already exists, if not, it adds the class.
Object.defineProperty(Node.prototype,'addClass', {
    value: function(c) {
        if(this.className.indexOf(c)<0) {
            this.className=this.className+=' '+c;
        }
        return this;
    },
    writable:false,
    enumerable:false,
    configurable:false
});
// removeClass()
// removes the class and cleans up the className value by changing double 
// spacing to single spacing and trimming any leading or trailing spaces
Object.defineProperty(Node.prototype,'removeClass', {
    value: function(c) {
        this.className=this.className.replace(c,'').replace('  ',' ').trim();
        return this;
    },
    writable:false,
    enumerable:false,
    configurable:false
});

Now you can call myElement.removeClass('myClass')

or chain it: myElement.removeClass("oldClass").addClass("newClass");

8
  • 3
    I'm very late here, but I have an example case where this would not work: Consider an element that has classes testClass and testClass2. (class="testClass testClass2") We wish to remove testClass from the element. Result using your method: class="2" This is why breaking it into an array is favourable. Of course, it is still possible to achieve the correct result using pure string manipulation, but it becomes more complex. If you don't want a mess of code you'll need to use Regex. The advantage of using an array is that the code is easily readable. May 15, 2014 at 2:06
  • @YM_Industries You're right! I'll edit my post.
    – Duncan
    May 16, 2014 at 20:01
  • @Knu Native Element.classList.add() doesn't support the space in "one two".
    – Duncan
    Mar 6, 2015 at 11:05
  • @Knu What about ".one.two", ("one", "two", ...), ["one","two"], {"0":"one","1":"two"}... etc. I'll leave non-standard parameter handling to the person implementing their code. :)
    – Duncan
    Mar 6, 2015 at 18:41
  • classList isn't supported in IE < 11. You can use regex instead : this.className = this.className.replace(new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)' + className + '(?:\\s|$)'), '').trim();
    – Flox
    May 10, 2017 at 8:02
20

It's very simple, I think.

document.getElementById("whatever").classList.remove("className");
5
  • 8
    This has poor cross-browser support. Internet Explorer doesn't support it in any version prior to 10. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/… Aug 26, 2013 at 20:58
  • 3
    This to me seems like the right answer. If you are worried about cross browser use a polyfill. github.com/eligrey/classList.js Aug 28, 2013 at 16:28
  • 3
    @ShannonPoole Sometimes you just need to do a simple task in an IE8-compatible way and you don't want it to depend on library support or a heavy polyfill.
    – acjay
    Feb 19, 2015 at 12:53
  • 3
    @acjay and sometimes you throw caution to the wind and just follow the modern standard :) Feb 20, 2015 at 10:13
  • 1
    To support IE, you can use regex instead : this.className = this.className.replace(new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)' + className + '(?:\\s|$)'), '').trim();
    – Flox
    May 10, 2017 at 8:04
10

try:

function removeClassName(elem, name){
    var remClass = elem.className;
    var re = new RegExp('(^| )' + name + '( |$)');
    remClass = remClass.replace(re, '$1');
    remClass = remClass.replace(/ $/, '');
    elem.className = remClass;
}
5
var element = document.getElementById('example_id');
var remove_class = 'example_class';

element.className = element.className.replace(' ' + remove_class, '').replace(remove_class, '');
0
0

I use this JS snippet code :

First of all, I reach all the classes then according to index of my target class, I set className = "".

Target = document.getElementsByClassName("yourClass")[1];
Target.className="";
1
  • 5
    This is not a good solution because it will remove all classes from the element.
    – dzimney
    Aug 11, 2017 at 19:09
-7
document.getElementById("whatever").className += "classToKeep";

With the plus sign ('+') appending the class as opposed to overwriting any existing classes

2
  • 1
    Wrong, += adds a class to the existing list of classes
    – OverCoder
    Jan 10, 2016 at 15:42
  • You could add space before newly added class to make it less wrong.
    – iMatoria
    May 21, 2018 at 5:03

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