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For my app, I want 3 categories of performance:

"BASELINE_CONSTRAINED" - for older devices, made before 2012

"BASELINE" - 2012-2013 ..."now" ..."standard"

"BASELINE_EXTENDED" - High-end devices, bleeding edge.

I've done this on iOS no problem -- less devices to wrangle, so I can specifically set by device ID.

But with 4000+ device types on Android, what's the best way to find devices by "ship date"?

Thoughts: - Some combination of DPI and Screen Size? - Android SDK X ...but people can upgrade - Processor speed? - how about build.prop "date" -> ro.build.date=Sat Nov 17 16:10:21 GMT 2012

Thanks in advance!

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    You should classify by capabilities, not by year of production. That is of no value at all in Android - your classification ("<2012: constrained; >2013: High end") is not correct. – Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 4 '14 at 23:12
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    Agreed. While the top end climbs each year, Android still powers many lower-end devices. Part of the work for Android 4.4 ("Project Svelte") is specifically to make it easier for manufacturers to run newer Android versions on lower-powered devices. – CommonsWare Feb 4 '14 at 23:17
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    If processor speed and GPU speed is a capability, I could use it as a classification of performance. But "feature: has GPU" isn't enough. The thinking behind "year of production" classification is that it provides broad coverage. I'm comfortable saying "Any Android phone offered in 2011 will not run my app sufficiently." And: "Any Android Phone released in 2013 WILL run my app at a "baseline" level. And: "Any phone in 2014 gets _extended capabilities." But if this is impossible, what's the next best solution? – Montego Feb 5 '14 at 2:33
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    It is completely impossible to classify by year as you want it. No chance at all, not even hints. There are primitive devices produced today while some old ones are still quite capable by today's standards. And there probably is no single value that determines if your app runs fine. Only solution: Test on as many devices as possible and enable only those (or those that are "similar" but that could turn out dangerous). Of course you can buy this service. – Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 8 '14 at 12:33
  • Thanks. Yeah, I've come to this conclusion too. Sucks. According to Google, I support about 3k devices. But I know that hundreds of them don't have enough "juice" to run my app well. It's like trying to run a unity game on an old device. It might "work" ...but is it playable? Absolutely not. So I'm left to manually exclude devices, 1 at a time, for potentially 1000s. Too bad Google doesn't let you upload a csv for this. – Montego Feb 8 '14 at 15:48
2

Facebook has released a better option to my manual "performance class" approach.

It's called Year Class: https://github.com/facebook/device-year-class

Glad to see this issue being solved!

0

Update:
While I still use the approach below to reduce the device compatibility to only "newer" and larger screen devices -- which is required for my application -- I ended up needing even more control.

I found that the android hardware platform is always(?) incorporated into the /system/build.prop file. It's the most reliable property I've found when testing across about a dozen devices (every manufacturer decides to put different properties in there, and very few like to report on CPU speed or complete graphics card capabilities).

Using the hardware platform, I can reliably separate out the top-tier devices from the rest.

I call this "performance class".

Class 1 = my lowest end devices.

Class 2 = my baseline device (as of right now)

Class 3 = my highest end devices.

const SD600:Array = ["APQ8064T","APQ8064AB","APQ8064-1AA","APQ8064-DEB","APQ8064-FLO","APQ8064M","8064-AU","8936","8939"];

const SD800:Array = ["8074-AA","8274-AA","8674-AA","8974-AA","8974-AB","8074-AB","8274-AB","8274-AC","8674-AB","8974-AB","8974-AC","APQ8084","MSM8974","MSM8992","MSM8994"];

const TEGRA:Array = ["TEGRA k1"];

Those are model numbers directly from Qualcomm and others -- thankfully there are only a handful of platform providers.

With "Class 3" devices reliably detected, I can toggle more advanced application features like high end transparency blend modes and higher quality rendering (It's a video creation app).

Sure, I could turn those things on for my baseline devices. But it makes them run slower (poor UX) and increases the chances for a memory related crash (almost a guaranteed negative review).

I like this solution because it grows with my app. When the next generation of hardware is released, I simply add the model numbers to an array and create a "Class 4". Then I can implement features that will only run on Class 4 devices, and eventually move my baseline to "Class 3".

So while the solution below is critical to ensuring only qualified "new enough" devices get to run my app, the secondary feature-specific adjustment is achieved using Performance Classes, based on the hardware platform variable which is consistently present in the android props.

--

There are roughly 5k devices that Google Play tracks.

I managed to get my "Supported" list down to about 2500 with the following settings in the manifest:

    <supports-screens
                android:smallScreens="false"
                android:normalScreens="true"
                android:largeScreens="true"
                android:xlargeScreens="true"
                android:requiresSmallestWidthDp="360"/>
             <compatible-screens>
                <!-- list the screens you support here -->
                <screen android:screenSize="normal" android:screenDensity="hdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="normal" android:screenDensity="xhdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="large" android:screenDensity="hdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="large" android:screenDensity="xhdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="xlarge" android:screenDensity="hdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="xlarge" android:screenDensity="xhdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="normal" android:screenDensity="480"/> 
                <screen android:screenSize="large" android:screenDensity="480"/>
                <screen android:screenSize="xlarge" android:screenDensity="480"/>
              </compatible-screens> 

I'm only showing the parts of the manifest that had a difference. For example, minsdk doesn't affect supported devices because in theory people can upgrade (in practice, not so much).

But even with these settings, I was still getting reports that people were having trouble with the app (in the form of 1 star reviews) so I found a way to cull it down further to 752:

                <supports-screens
                android:smallScreens="false"
                android:normalScreens="true"
                android:largeScreens="true"
                android:xlargeScreens="true"
                android:requiresSmallestWidthDp="360"/>
             <compatible-screens>
                <!-- list the screens you support here -->
                <screen android:screenSize="normal" android:screenDensity="xhdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="normal" android:screenDensity="480"/> 
                <screen android:screenSize="large" android:screenDensity="xhdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="large" android:screenDensity="480"/>
                <screen android:screenSize="xlarge" android:screenDensity="xhdpi" />
                <screen android:screenSize="xlarge" android:screenDensity="480"/>
              </compatible-screens> 
            <application>   

There ARE some devices out there that fit in to the categories I'm excluding (hdpi) and (small) ... but I've come to the conclusion that most of them are under powered.

By focusing on xhdpi, there's a better chance that the device is a newer device, thus having a faster processor and more memory.... thus having a better chance of being made in 2013+ :)

note: Google Play often doesn't update the "supported devices" list until after you publish to production. Even uploading to the "Beta" section doesn't always update the device list, making manifest iteration very time consuming and problematic. Just keep in mind that you can always roll a build back... so pushing to production to check the supported devices list isn't THAT bad.

Request to Google: You offer the ability to exclude devices that would otherwise be allowed by a manifest.
Please also offer the ability to INCLUDE devices that are not on a manifest. For "high end" apps, the selection set is much smaller, and it's far easier to include on a case by case, than exclude.

  • Wow, that is an horrible approach. – Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 9 '14 at 21:58
  • Would you mind explaining why it's so horrible, or potentially offering a better solution? The manifest is designed to allow users to specify compatibility, is it not? – Montego Feb 10 '14 at 3:14
  • Yes, but you are not going for compatibility but try to derive performance information from screen properties. This does not work, the same as to derive performance information from the manufacturing year - there simply is no such relation. If your goal is to more or less randomly chop down the number of devices that can download your app then it works. But then there is an easy trick to reduce that number to zero. – Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 10 '14 at 10:59
  • I respectfully disagree with your conclusion -- there is a strong correlation between screen size and density (ppi) and device performance. There are exceptions to the rule, but in general the bigger the screen and higher the screen resolution, the newer the device (and the faster it is). But now, in 2014 when we're using devices with over 400ppi, we've perhaps reached a point of diminishing returns. But to help classify performance for the last few years where screen size and density have skyrocketed, this is working. – Montego Feb 10 '14 at 15:31
  • There are exceptions. But worse: You are throwing out a lot of devices that would be capable but have a smaller display or density. If you can live with people that do not find your application then this is acceptable for you. It is definitely not acceptable as a general rule. Most publishers want as much customers as possible. Again: It is a highly flawed heuristic that only serves the purposes of reducing your potential customer base to reduce your workload. Not a good idea in general, but may serve you. – Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 10 '14 at 21:20

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