9
struct A{
    int a; int b;
};
static const struct A a = {.a1 = 1, .a2 = 42};

struct B{
    struct A[666][510]
};
static const struct B b;

I would like to initialize b with copies of a. However, I cannot touch static const things with memcpy(). And I need b to be static const, because that way it gets put into flash and not ram memory.

How do I make this work. The compiler is arm-none-eabi-gcc with -std=c89, I think.

6
  • See the answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/21528288/… Feb 5 '14 at 11:33
  • 4
    .a1 = 1 : unknown field. and not c89.
    – BLUEPIXY
    Feb 5 '14 at 11:34
  • 1
    Check the linker script for sections that gets put into flash, and add a section attribute to place it in that section. Feb 5 '14 at 11:35
  • So you want 666*510 copies of the same pair of data? And you want it to be const? I'm just curious how this will be useful. Feb 5 '14 at 12:15
  • @BLUEPIXY, it's some wierd mix of ansi c and gnu extensions. for example for(int i = 0;i < 5; i++) does not compile.
    – Vorac
    Feb 5 '14 at 12:45
1

You can try this, though it works specifically for the dimensions that you specify (666 x 510):

#define X001 {1,42}
#define X002 X001,X001
#define X004 X002,X002
#define X008 X004,X004
#define X016 X008,X008
#define X032 X016,X016
#define X064 X032,X032
#define X128 X064,X064
#define X256 X128,X128

#define Y001 {X256,X128,X064,X032,X016,X008,X004,X002}
#define Y002 Y001,Y001
#define Y004 Y002,Y002
#define Y008 Y004,Y004
#define Y016 Y008,Y008
#define Y032 Y016,Y016
#define Y064 Y032,Y032
#define Y128 Y064,Y064
#define Y256 Y128,Y128
#define Y512 Y256,Y256

static const struct A a = X001;
static const struct B b = {{Y512,Y128,Y016,Y008,Y002}};
1
  • A little messy, but the way to go. They say macros are the crutches of the language. Thanks a lot!
    – Vorac
    Mar 10 '14 at 14:43
1

I recommend that you put these arrays in a separate module in order to achieve encapsulation. Then inside that module you do not need to make B a const but make it static instead. Any access to this data must be done via getters and setters like this:


mydata.h

#define BA_SIZE 666

struct A{
    int a; int b;
};

struct B{
    struct A stuff[BA_SIZE];
};

void init(void);
struct A * getB(unsigned int i);
void setB(unsigned int i, struct A element);

mydata.c:

#include "mydata.h"

static const struct A a = {.a = 1, .b = 42};
static struct B b;

void init(void)
{
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<BA_SIZE; i++) {
        b.stuff[i] = a;
    }
} 

struct A * getB(unsigned int i)
{
    return(&b.stuff[i]);
}

void setB(unsigned int i, struct A element)
{
    if (i > BA_SIZE) { return; }
    b.stuff[i].a = element.a;
    b.stuff[i].b = element.b;
}


main.c:
#include <stdio.h>
#include "mydata.h"

int main(void)
{
    init();
    unsigned int num=1;
    struct A * something = getB(num);
    printf("element [%u] a=%i b=%i \n", num, something->a, something->b);

    return(0);
}


1
  • Making the data static const allows the linker to put it into flash, and not the precious ram. And I can do that, as I only need to be reading this data. On the other hand, for changing data, your example looks great.
    – Vorac
    Mar 10 '14 at 14:42
0

On linux this complies with gcc -std=c89 (don't know about arm cross compiler)

typedef struct A{
    int a; int b;
} TA;

typedef struct ARR3 {
    TA a[3];
} TARR3;


typedef struct ARR33 {
 TARR3 b[3];
} TARR33;

static const TA a = {.a = 1, .b = 42};

TARR33 aa = {
   .b[0] = { .a[0] = {.a = 1, .b = 1}, .a[1] = {.a = 2, .b = 2}, .a[2] = {.a = 3, .b = 3} },
   .b[1] = { .a[0] = {.a = 4, .b = 4}, .a[1] = {.a = 5, .b = 5}, .a[2] = {.a = 1, .b = 2} },
   .b[2] = { .a[0] = {.a = 1, .b = 1}, .a[1] = {.a = 1, .b = 2}, .a[2] = {.a = 1, .b = 2} }
            };

main()
{
  return 0;
}
1
  • Well, yea, nut you still need to type all the numbers. In my case the array is much larger than 3x3. It appers that this is the only answer. But it is so damn ugly!
    – Vorac
    Feb 6 '14 at 8:48

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