1

I have the following HTML document:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8" />
</head>
<body>
    <table border="1">
        <tbody>
            <tr>
                <td>
                    <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1">
                        <rect width="100" height="50" style="fill:rgb(0,0,255);stroke-width:1;stroke:rgb(0,0,0)" />
                    </svg>
                </td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>
    <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1">
        <rect width="100" height="50" style="fill:rgb(0,0,255);stroke-width:1;stroke:rgb(0,0,0)" />
    </svg>
</body>
</html>

I rendered it in IE9, Firefox and Chrome (both the latest as of this writing). Non of them seem to get it right, and they all produce different output.


Here are the results:

IE9

IE9

Notice the unexplained blank space causing the td to expand instead of wrapping the svg tightly

Firefox

Firefox

The td still has an unexplained height (like IE), but a width of 0, thus leaving the svg to overflow

Chrome

Chrome

This one seems the worst. The svg in the table is not even displayed this time!


So the questions are:

  1. Are any of these right. I would expect the table to fully (display and) contain and tightly wrap the svg.
  2. Why isn't Chrome even displaying the svg in the table?
  3. Is there a workaround to get svg images in tables to display consistently across all three browsers?
2

Give the <svg> element matching height and width attributes, such as:

<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" width="100" height="50">
  • This answers #3. Any idea about #1 & #2? – Baruch Feb 5 '14 at 15:01
  • Also, while it does work, this gets very tedious for a lot of svg images. Especially since the dimensions of an embedded svg are not easily found. – Baruch Feb 5 '14 at 15:06
  • 1
    Unfortunately, this is the way things are. You need to specify the size of the viewport as well as the size and origins of all shapes and paths within the svg. The reasons browsers are showing differently is because of different default sizes for the svg element. – Phylogenesis Feb 5 '14 at 15:12

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